Bitcoin’s Incentive Scheme and the Rational Individual

Binance Customer ☎️ +¹ 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝟢𝟧𝟪𝟥 ☎️Support Number :EnergySlowYuu

Binance Customer ☎️ +¹ 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝟢𝟧𝟪𝟥 ☎️Support Number :EnergySlowYuu Binance for the most part alluded to as a cryptographic money, a virtual money, or possibly an electronic money - is a sort of money that is virtual. It's like an online variation of money. You can utilize it to buy administrations and items, however not many stores acknowledge Bitcoin yet, and a few nations have restricted it completely. How does Binance convey the outcomes? Every Binance it's generally a PC record that is kept in a' computerized wallet' application with a cell phone or maybe PC.
People can convey Binance (or perhaps part of one) in your computerized wallet, and furthermore you can send Binances to others.
Each exchange is caught in an open rundown known as the blockchain.
It is then simple to follow the account of Binances to keep individuals from spending coins they don't wear, making duplicates, or possibly fix in exchanges.
In what capacity can individuals get Binances ?
You will discover three essential ways people get Binances.
You can buy Binances utilizing' genuine' money.
You can offer things and let individuals pay out with Binances.
Or on the other hand they could be made utilizing a PC.
Exactly how are new Binances made?
For your Binances telephone framework to work, individuals can make their PC procedure exchanges for everyone.
PC frameworks exist, working out muddled totals. In some cases they're remunerated with a Binances as a result of the proprietor to hold.
A great many people make amazing PCs basically to attempt to get Binances. This' known as mining.
In any case, the totals are beginning to be more and harder to stop such a large number of Binances being created.
In the event that you started mining now, it might be numerous prior years you got one Binances.
You may end up spending more cash on electrical force for your PC or PC than the Binances will be justified, despite all the trouble.
inance support number 1844-907-0583 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1844-907-0583's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 1844-907-0583 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 1844-907-0583's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 1844-907-0583 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
submitted by EnergySlowYuu to u/EnergySlowYuu [link] [comments]

Binance Customer Service ☎️ +¹ 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝟢𝟧𝟪𝟥 ☎️Number :jkdfdh

Binance Customer Service ☎️ +¹ 𝟪𝟦𝟦-𝟫𝟢𝟩-𝟢𝟧𝟪𝟥 ☎️Number :jkdfdh Binance for the most part alluded to as a cryptographic money, a virtual money, or possibly an electronic money - is a sort of money that is virtual. It's like an online variation of money. You can utilize it to buy administrations and items, however not many stores acknowledge Bitcoin yet, and a few nations have restricted it completely. How does Binance convey the outcomes? Every Binance it's generally a PC record that is kept in a' computerized wallet' application with a cell phone or maybe PC.
People can convey Binance (or perhaps part of one) in your computerized wallet, and furthermore you can send Binances to others.
Each exchange is caught in an open rundown known as the blockchain.
It is then simple to follow the account of Binances to keep individuals from spending coins they don't wear, making duplicates, or possibly fix in exchanges.
In what capacity can individuals get Binances ?
You will discover three essential ways people get Binances.
You can buy Binances utilizing' genuine' money.
You can offer things and let individuals pay out with Binances.
Or on the other hand they could be made utilizing a PC.
Exactly how are new Binances made?
For your Binances telephone framework to work, individuals can make their PC procedure exchanges for everyone.
PC frameworks exist, working out muddled totals. In some cases they're remunerated with a Binances as a result of the proprietor to hold.
A great many people make amazing PCs basically to attempt to get Binances. This' known as mining.
In any case, the totals are beginning to be more and harder to stop such a large number of Binances being created.
In the event that you started mining now, it might be numerous prior years you got one Binances.
You may end up spending more cash on electrical force for your PC or PC than the Binances will be justified, despite all the trouble.
inance support number 1844-907-0583 CEO Changpeng "CZ" Zhao really doesn't want to tell you where his firm's headquarters is located.
Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has loads of offices, he continued, with staff in 50 countries. It was a new type of organization that doesn't need registered bank accounts and postal addresses.
To kick off ConsenSys' Ethereal Summit on Thursday, Unchained Podcast host Laura Shin held a cozy fireside chat with Zhao who, to mark the occasion, was wearing a personalized football shirt emblazoned with the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 brand.
Scheduled for 45 minutes, Zhao spent most of it explaining how libra and China's digital yuan were unlikely to be competitors to existing stablecoin providers; how Binance support number 1844-907-0583's smart chain wouldn't tread on Ethereum's toes – "that depends on the definition of competing," he said – and how Binance support number 1844-907-0583 had an incentive to keep its newly acquired CoinMarketCap independent from the exchange.
There were only five minutes left on the clock. Zhao was looking confident; he had just batted away a thorny question about an ongoing lawsuit. It was looking like the home stretch.
Then it hit. Shin asked the one question Zhao really didn't want to have to answer, but many want to know: Where is Binance support number 1844-907-0583's headquarters?
This seemingly simple question is actually more complex. Until February, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 was considered to be based in Malta. That changed when the island European nation announced that, no, Binance support number 1844-907-0583 is not under its jurisdiction. Since then Binance support number 1844-907-0583 has not said just where, exactly, it is now headquartered.
Little wonder that when asked Zhao reddened; he stammered. He looked off-camera, possibly to an aide. "Well, I think what this is is the beauty of the blockchain, right, so you don't have to ... like where's the Bitcoin office, because Bitcoin doesn't have an office," he said.
The line trailed off, then inspiration hit. "What kind of horse is a car?" Zhao asked. "Wherever I sit, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office. Wherever I need somebody, is going to be the Binance support number 1844-907-0583 office," he said.
Zhao may have been hoping the host would move onto something easier. But Shin wasn't finished: "But even to do things like to handle, you know, taxes for your employees, like, I think you need a registered business entity, so like why are you obfuscating it, why not just be open about it like, you know, the headquarters is registered in this place, why not just say that?"
Zhao glanced away again, possibly at the person behind the camera. Their program had less than two minutes remaining. "It's not that we don't want to admit it, it's not that we want to obfuscate it or we want to kind of hide it. We're not hiding, we're in the open," he said.
Shin interjected: "What are you saying that you're already some kind of DAO [decentralized autonomous organization]? I mean what are you saying? Because it's not the old way [having a headquarters], it's actually the current way ... I actually don't know what you are or what you're claiming to be."
Zhao said Binance support number 1844-907-0583 isn't a traditional company, more a large team of people "that works together for a common goal." He added: "To be honest, if we classified as a DAO, then there's going to be a lot of debate about why we're not a DAO. So I don't want to go there, either."
"I mean nobody would call you guys a DAO," Shin said, likely disappointed that this wasn't the interview where Zhao made his big reveal.
submitted by EnergySlowYuu to u/EnergySlowYuu [link] [comments]

[Part - 32] Large college ebooks/eTextbooks thread for cheap rates [$4 to $25]

  1. Business Law with UCC Applications Student Edition, 13th Edition: Gordon Brown & Paul Sukys
  2. Sex-Related Homicide and Death Investigation: Practical and Clinical Perspectives, 2nd Edition: Vernon J. Geberth
  3. Understanding Music, 8th Edition: Jeremy Yudkin
  4. Integrated Product and Process Design and Development: The Product Realization Process, 2nd Edition: Edward B. Magrab & Satyandra K. Gupta & F. Patrick McCluskey & Peter Sandborn
  5. Security Analysis, 6th Edition: Benjamin Graham & David Dodd & Warren Buffett
  6. Contemporary Nursing: Issues, Trends, & Management, 8th Edition: Barbara Cherry & Susan R. Jacob
  7. Mediation Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition: Suzanne McCorkle & Melanie J. Reese
  8. Deviant Behavior, 12th Edition: Alex Thio & Jim D. Taylor & Martin D. Schwartz
  9. A Guide to Econometrics, 6th Edition: Peter Kennedy
  10. Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing Among Five Approaches, 4th Edition: John W. Creswell & Cheryl N. Poth
  11. Ethics in Counseling and Therapy: Developing an Ethical Identity, 1st Edition: Rick A. Houser & Stephen Joseph Thoma
  12. Legal Aspects of Sports, 2nd Edition: John J. Miller & Kristi Schoepfer
  13. Western Civilizations: Their History & Their Culture, (Vol. 2), 19th Edition: Joshua Cole & Carol Symes
  14. Modern Principles of Macroeconomics, 4th Edition: Tyler Cowen & Alex Tabarrok
  15. Reading Research: A User-Friendly Guide for Health Professionals, 6th Edition: Barbara Davies & Jo Logan
  16. Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology, 6th Edition: Steven M. Cahn
  17. Design of Machinery, 6th Edition: Robert Norton
  18. Entrepreneurship, 5th Edition: Andrew Zacharakis & William D. Bygrave & Andrew C. Corbett
  19. Chemical Dependency Counseling: A Practical Guide, 5th Edition: Robert R. Perkinson
  20. Database Systems: The Complete Book, 2nd Edition: Hector Garcia-Molina & Jeffrey D. Ullman & Jennifer Widom
  21. CompTIA A+ Core 1 Exam: Guide to Computing Infrastructure, 10th Edition: Jean Andrews & Joy Dark & Jill West
  22. An Introduction to Family Social Work, 4th Edition: Donald Collins & Catheleen Jordan & Heather Coleman
  23. Bates’ Nursing Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking, 2nd Edition: Beth Hogan-Quigley & Mary Louise Palm & Lynn S. Bickley
  24. Textbook of Cancer Epidemiology, 3rd Edition: Hans-Olov Adami & David J. Hunter & Pagona Lagiou & Lorelei Mucci
  25. New and Emerging Issues in Latinx Health, 1st Edition, 2020 Edition: Airín D. Martínez & Scott D. Rhodes
  26. Explorations: Introduction to Astronomy, 9th Edition: Thomas Arny
  27. Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology, 9th Edition: Ronald J. Comer & Jonathan S. Comer
  28. The Canadian Environment in Political Context, 2nd Edition: Andrea Olive
  29. Control Systems Engineering, 8th Edition: Norman S. Nise
  30. Elementary & Intermediate Algebra for College Students, 5th Edition: Allen R. Angel & Dennis Runde
  31. Biology for the Informed Citizen, 1st Edition: Donna M. Bozzone & Douglas S. Green
  32. The Personality Puzzle, 8th Edition: David C. Funder
  33. Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology 13th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa & Scott Linneman
  34. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 3rd Canadian Edition: Jonathan Berk
  35. Human Aging, 2nd Edition: Paul W. Foos & M. Cherie Clark
  36. Gardner's Art Through the Ages: A Global History, 16th Edition: Fred S. Kleiner
  37. ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS Coding Handbook, with Answers, 2019 Rev. Edition: Nelly Leon-Chisen
  38. Statistics for Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing: MyoungJin Kim & Caroline Mallory
  39. Docker in Action, 2nd Edition: Jeff Nickoloff & Stephen Kuenzli
  40. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Management, 2nd Edition: Daniel J. Decker & Shawn J. Riley & William F. Siemer
  41. Maternal Child Nursing Care, 6th Edition: Shannon E. Perry & Marilyn J. Hockenberry & Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk & David Wilson
  42. Public Speaking: Concepts and Skills for a Diverse Society, 8th Edition: Clella Jaffe
  43. Designing and Managing the Supply Chain, 3rd Edition: David Simchi-Levi & Philip Kaminsky & Edith Simchi-Levi
  44. Microbiology Experiments: A Health Science Perspective, 9th Edition: John Kleyn & Anna Oller
  45. Graduate Study in Psychology, 2019th Edition: American Psychological Association
  46. Data Mining for Business Analytics: Concepts, Techniques and Applications in Python, 1st Edition: Galit Shmueli & Peter C. Bruce & Peter Gedeck & Nitin R. Patel
  47. Modern Rhetorical Criticism, 4th Edition: Roderick P Hart & Suzanne M. Daughton & Rebecca Lavally
  48. Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing, 8th Edition: Gloria Leifer
  49. France From 1851 to the Present: Universalism in Crisis 2008 Edition: R. Célestin & E. DalMolin
  50. The Certified Six Sigma Yellow Belt Handbook: Govindarajan Ramu
  51. Essentials of Health Information Management, 2nd Edition: Michelle Green & Mary Jo Bowie
  52. Psychology of Gender, 5th Edition: Vicki S. Helgeson
  53. Health Insurance and Managed Care: What They Are and How They Work, 5th Edition: Peter R. Kongstvedt
  54. Successful Coaching, 4th Edition: Rainer Martens
  55. Internet Measurement: Infrastructure, Traffic and Applications, 1st Edition: Mark Crovella & Balachander Krishnamurthy
  56. CompTIA Security+ Practice Tests: Exam SY0-501, 1st Edition: S. Russell Christy & Chuck Easttom
  57. Anatomical Landmark Palpation, 1st Edition: Paula Maxwell
  58. Oracle Database 12c: The Complete Reference, 1st Edition: Bob Bryla & Kevin Loney
  59. Research Design in Counseling, 4th Edition: Puncky Paul Heppner & Bruce E. Wampold & Jesse Owen & Thompson & Kenneth T. Wang
  60. Fundamentals of Management, 11th Edition: Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter & David A. Decenzo
  61. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 7th Edition: American Psychological Association
  62. How to Do Systems Analysis: Primer and Casebook, 1st Edition: John E. Gibson & William T. Scherer & William F. Gibson & Michael C. Smith
  63. Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology, 12th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa
  64. Surveying Fundmanentals and Practices, 7th Edition: Jerry A. Nathanson & Michael T. Lanzafama & Philip Kissam
  65. The Sociology of Health, Illness, and Health Care: A Critical Approach, 8th Edition: Rose Weitz
  66. Calculus, 4th Edition: Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams & Robert Franzosa
  67. Federal Income Taxation, 5th Edition: Richard Schmalbeck & Lawrence Zelenak & Sarah B Lawsky
  68. Strategic Compensation: A Human Resource Management Approach, 9th Edition: Joseph J. Martocchio
  69. Applied Business Ethics: A Skills-Based Approach, 1st Edition: Dean Bredeson
  70. Junqueira's Basic Histology: Text and Atlas, 15th Edition: Anthony Mescher
  71. The PMP Exam: How to Pass on Your First Try, 6th Edition: Andy Crowe
  72. Mediation: Empowerment in Conflict Management, 2nd Edition: Kathy Domenici & Stephen W. Littlejohn
  73. Marketing Analytics: Strategic Models and Metrics, 1st Edition: Stephan Sorger
  74. Identities and Inequalities: Exploring the Intersections of Race, Class, Gender, & Sexuality, 3rd Edition: David Newman
  75. The Policy-Based Profession: An Introduction to Social Welfare Policy Analysis for Social Workers, 7th Edition: Philip R. Popple & Leslie Leighninger
  76. Burns and Grove's The Practice of Nursing Research: Appraisal, Synthesis, and Generation of Evidence, 8th Edition: Jennifer R. Gray & Susan K. Grove & Suzanne Sutherland
  77. China, Russia, and Twenty-First Century Global Geopolitics: Paul J. Bolt & Sharyl N. Cross
  78. Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm, 15th Edition, Global Edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Jane P. Laudon
  79. Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) Provider Manual, 16th Edition: American Heart Association
  80. Dutton's Orthopaedic: Examination, Evaluation and Intervention, 5th Edition: Mark Dutton
  81. 70-741 Networking with Windows Server 2016: Microsoft Official Academic Course
  82. Practical Business Math Procedures, 13th Edition: Jeffrey Slater
  83. Financial Accounting, 5th Edition: David Spiceland & Wayne Thomas & Don Herrmann
  84. Introduction to Global Politics, 5th Edition: Steven L. Lamy & John S. Masker
  85. Goldman-Cecil Medicine, 26th Edition: Lee Goldman & Andrew I. Schafer
  86. Social Beings: Core Motives in Social Psychology, 4th Edition: Susan T. Fiske
  87. Using Statistics in the Social and Health Sciences with SPSS and Excel, 1st Edition: Martin Lee Abbott
  88. Trigonometry, 1st edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  89. Social Development, 3rd Edition: Ross D. Parke & Glenn I. Roisman & Amanda J. Rose
  90. Assessment is Essential, 1st Edition: Susan Green & Robert Johnson
  91. Crafting the InfoSec Playbook: Security Monitoring and Incident Response Master Plan, 1st Edition: Jeff Bollinger & Brandon Enright & Matthew Valites
  92. Selecting Effective Treatments: A Comprehensive, Systematic Guide to Treating Mental Disorders, 5th Edition: Lourie W. Reichenberg & Linda Seligman
  93. DK Guide to Public Speaking, 3rd Edition: Lisa A. Ford-Brown & DK Dorling Kindersley
  94. A World Full of Women, 6th Edition: Martha C. Ward & Monica D. Edelstein
  95. Invention and Craft: A Guide to College Writing, 1st Edition: Ronda Leathers Dively
  96. Modern Optical Engineering, 4th Edition: Warren J. Smith
  97. An Introduction to Intercultural Communication: Identities in a Global Community, 9th Edition: Fred E. Jandt
  98. Children's Thinking: Cognitive Development and Individual Differences, 6th Edition: David F. Bjorklund & Kayla B. Causey
  99. Financial Accounting: An Introduction to Concepts, Methods and Uses, 14th Edition: Roman L. Weil & Katherine Schipper & Jennifer Francis
  100. Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die, 1st Edition: Chip Heath & Dan Heath
  101. Laboratory Manual for Introductory Geology, 4th Edition: Allan Ludman & Stephen Marshak
  102. Cognition, 6th Edition: Scott Sinnett & Daniel Smilek & Alan Kingstone
  103. Mathematical Statistics with Applications, 7th Edition: Dennis Wackerly & William Mendenhall & Richard L. Scheaffer
  104. We the People, Core 12th Edition: Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Margaret Weir & Caroline J. Tolbert & Andrea L. Campbell
  105. Organizational Behaviour: Understanding and Managing Life at Work, 10th Edition: Gary Johns
  106. Forecasting And Predictive Analytics With Forecast X, 7th Edition: J. Holton Wilson & Barry Keating
  107. Nurse as Educator: Principles of Teaching and Learning for Nursing Practice, 5th Edition: Susan B. Bastable
  108. Curriculum Development in Nursing Education, 4th Edition: Carroll L. Iwasiw & Mary-Anne Andrusyszyn & Dolly Goldenberg
  109. Exploring Social Issues: Using SPSS for Windows, 3rd Edition: Joseph F. Healey & John E. Boli & Earl R. Babbie & Frederick S. Halley
  110. ACSM's Resources for the Personal Trainer, 5th Edition: American College of Sports Medicine
  111. Adolescence, Canadian Edition: Ian McMahan & Susan Thompson
  112. Business Ethics in Action: Seeking Human Excellence in Organizations: Domenec Mele
  113. Community & Public Health Nursing: Evidence for Practice, 3rd Edition: Rosanna DeMarco & Judith Healey-Walsh
  114. Macroeconomics, 10th Edition: Andrew B. Abel & Ben Bernanke & Dean Croushore
  115. Principles of Corporate Finance, 11th Edition: Richard Brealey
  116. Studio Thinking from the Start: The K–8 Art Educator’s Handbook, 1st Edition: Jillian Hogan & Lois Hetland & Diane B. Jaquith & Ellen Winner & David P. Nelson
  117. Engineering Design Graphics with Autodesk Inventor 2020, 1st Edition: James D. Bethune
  118. Indian Polity, 6th Edition: M. Laxmikanth
  119. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers: A Contemporary Approach, 10th Edition: Gary L. Musser & Blake E. Peterson & William F. Burger
  120. Foundations of Materials Science and Engineering, 6th Edition: William Smith & Javad Hashemi
  121. Comparative Health Systems: A Global Perspective, 2nd Edition: James A. Johnson & Carleen Stoskopf & Leiyu Shi
  122. The Writer's Presence, 9th Edition: Donald McQuade & Robert Atwan
  123. Statistics in Action: Understanding a World of Data, 2nd Edition: Ann E. Watkins & Richard L. Scheaffer & George W. Cobb
  124. The New Rules of Marketing and PR: How to Use Social Media, Online Video, Mobile Applications, Blogs, News Releases, and Viral Marketing to Reach Buyers Directly, 5th Edition: David Meerman Scott
  125. E-Marketing, 7th Edition: Judy Strauss & Raymond Frost
  126. Human Anatomy, 6th Edition: Kenneth Saladin
  127. Microsoft Excel 2019 Data Analysis and Business Modeling, 6th Edition: Wayne Winston
  128. South-Western Federal Taxation 2020: Corporations, Partnerships, Estates and Trusts, 43rd Edition: William A. Raabe & James C. Young & William H. Hoffman & Annette Nellen & David M. Maloney
  129. Fundamentals of Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems, 7th Edition: R. Kent Nagle & Edward B. Saff & Arthur David Snider
  130. Brooks/Cole Empowerment Series: An Introduction to Family Social Work, 4th Edition: Donald Collins & Catheleen Jordan & Heather Coleman
  131. We The People: An Introduction to American Government, 12th Edition: Thomas Patterson
  132. As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom through Radical Resistance, 3rd Edition: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson
  133. Biology for the Informed Citizen, 1st Edition: Donna M. Bozzone & Douglas S. Green
  134. Introduction to Econometrics, 4th Edition: James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson
  135. Sources of World Societies, Volume 2, 3rd Edition: Merry Wiesner-Hanks & Patricia Buckley Ebrey & Davila Roger & Clare Crowston & John P. McKay
  136. Psychology of Sport Injury, 1st Edition: Britton W. Brewer & Charles Redmond
  137. America: A Narrative History, Volume 1, 11th Edition: David E. Shi
  138. Advocacy: Championing Ideas and Influencing Others, 1st Edition: John A. Daly
  139. Cognitive Psychology: Applying The Science of the Mind, 3rd Edition: Bridget Robinson-Riegler & Gregory L. Robinson-Riegler
  140. Collect, Combine, and Transform Data Using Power Query in Excel and Power BI, 1st Edition: Gil Raviv
  141. New Perspectives Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2019 Introductory, 1st Edition: Patrick Carey & Katherine T. Pinard & Ann Shaffer & Mark Shellman & Sasha Vodnik
  142. Charlotte Huck's Children's Literature: A Brief Guide, 3rd Edition: Barbara Kiefer & Cynthia Tyson
  143. The Fast Forward MBA in Project Management: Eric Verzuh
  144. Evidence-Based Practice for Nurses: Appraisal and Application of Research, 4th Edition: Nola A. Schmidt & Janet M. Brown
  145. Wound Management: Principles and Practices, 3rd Edition: Betsy Myers
  146. CCNA Routing and Switching Portable Command Guide, 4th Edition: Scott Empson
  147. Personality, 10th Edition: Jerry M. Burger
  148. THE LAW OF WORK: COMMON LAW AND THE REGULATION OF WORK: David Doorey
  149. Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design, 11th Edition: Richard Budynas
  150. Molecular Biology, 3rd Edition: David P. Clark & Nanette J. Pazdernik & Michelle R. McGehee
  151. Linear Algebra With Applications, 8th Edition: Steve Leon
  152. Advocacy Practice for Social Justice, 4th Edition: Richard Hoefer
  153. Exploring Your Role in Early Childhood Education, 4th Edition: Mary Renck Jalongo & Joan Packer Isenberg
  154. Workbook for Diagnostic Medical Sonography: The Vascular System (Diagnostic Medical Sonography Series), 2nd Edition: Ann Marie Kupinski
  155. Forensic Pathology, 2nd Edition: Dominick DiMaio & Vincent J.M. DiMaio
  156. Marketing Metaphoria: What Deep Metaphors Reveal About the Minds of Consumers: Gerald Zaltman & Lindsay H. Zaltman
  157. Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Counseling, 6th Edition: Theodore P. Remley & Barbara P. Herlihy
  158. Case Studies in Child and Adolescent Psychopathology, 2nd Edition: DeDe Wohlfarth & Robin K. Morgan
  159. PFIN, 7th Edition: Randall Billingsley & Lawrence J. Gitman & Michael D. Joehnk
  160. Understanding Violence and Victimization, 6th Edition: Robert J. Meadows
  161. Theory and Design for Mechanical Measurements, 6th Edition: Richard S. Figliola & Donald E. Beasley
  162. Great Demo!: How To Create And Execute Stunning Software Demonstrations, 2nd Edition: Peter E. Cohan
  163. Understanding Environmental Law, 3rd Edition: Philip Weinberg & Kevin A. Reilly
  164. Exercises for the Shoulder to Hand: Release Your Kinetic Chain: Brian James Abelson & Abelson Kamali Thara & Lavanya Balasubramaniyam
  165. Sport, Violence and Society: 2nd Edition: Kevin Young
  166. The Vascular System (Diagnostic Medical Sonography Series), 2nd Edition: Ann Marie Kupinski
  167. Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks, 1st Edition: Evan Gilman & Doug Barth
  168. The Ethics of Coaching Sports: Moral, Social and Legal Issues, 1st Edition: Robert Simon
  169. Library and Information Center Management, 9th Edition: Barbara Moran & Claudia Morner
  170. Attacking Faulty Reasoning, 7th Edition: T. Edward Damer
  171. Computer-Based Construction Project Management: Tarek Hegazy
  172. Criminal Investigation, 5th Edition: Aric W. Dutelle & Ronald F. Becker
  173. Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 4th Edition: Stephen T. Thornton & Andrew Rex
  174. Essentials of Online Course Design: A Standards-Based Guide, 2nd Edition: Marjorie Vai & Kristen Sosulski
  175. Introduction to Chemistry, 5th Edition: Rich Bauer & James Birk & Pamela Marks
  176. Windows Server 2016 Unleashed, 1st Edition: Rand Morimoto & Jeffrey Shapiro & Guy Yardeni
  177. Network Security Essentials: Applications and Standards, 6th Edition: William Stallings
  178. Fundamentals of Web Development, 2nd Edition: Randy Connolly & Ricardo Hoar
  179. Reading Critically, Writing Well, 11th Edition: Rise B. Axelrod & Charles R. Cooper & Alison M. Warriner
  180. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 8th Edition: James Stewart
  181. Fast Facts for the Student Nurse: Nursing Student Success in a Nutshell, 1st Edition: Susan Stabler-Haas
  182. The Self, 1st Edition: Jonathon Brown
  183. Ordinary Differential Equations, Revised Edition: Morris Tenenbaum & Harry Pollard
  184. Global Business Today, 11th Edition: Charles W. L. Hill & G. Tomas M. Hult
  185. Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences, 3rd Edition: Mary L. Boas
  186. Experimental Design: Procedures for the Behavioral Sciences, 4th Edition: Roger E. Kirk
  187. MKTG, 4th Canadian Edition: Charles W. Lamb & Joe F. Hair
  188. Calculus of a Single Variable, 11th Edition: Ron Larson & Bruce H. Edwards
  189. Supervision in Early Childhood Education, 3rd Edition: Joseph J. Caruso & M. Temple Fawcett & Leslie R. Williams
  190. Developing Child, The: Pearson New International Edition, 13th Edition: Helen Bee & Denise Boyd
  191. The Elusive Eden: A New History of California, 5th Edition: Richard B. Rice & William A. Bullough & Richard J. Orsi & Mary Ann Irwin & Michael F. Magliari & Cecilia M. Tsu
  192. Survey of Operating Systems, 6th Edition: Jane Holcombe & Charles Holcombe
  193. International Marketing, 2nd Edition: Daniel W. Baack & Barbara Czarnecka & Donald E. Baack
  194. Data Mining for Business Analytics: Concepts, Techniques and Applications in Python, 1st Edition: Galit Shmueli & Peter C. Bruce & Peter Gedeck & Nitin R. Patel
  195. The Politics of Public Budgeting: Getting and Spending, Borrowing and Balancing, 9th Edition: Irene S. Rubin
  196. Operations Strategy, 5th Edition: Nigel Slack & Mike Lewis
  197. Digital Forensics Workbook: Hands-on Activities in Digital Forensics: Michael Robinson
  198. The Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics, 1st Edition: Leslie Francis
  199. Building Accounting Systems Using Access 2010, 8th Edition: James Perry & Richard Newmark
  200. Early Childhood Education Today, 14th Edition: George S Morrison
  201. Health and Health Care Delivery in Canada, 2nd Edition: Valerie D. Thompson
  202. Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 4th Edition: Michael J. Kavanagh & Richard D. Johnson
  203. College Algebra: Real Mathematics, Real People, 7th Edition: Ron Larson
  204. Personality Psychology, 1st Canadian Edition: Carolyn Ensley & Randy J. Larsen & David M. Buss & David King
  205. 70-740 Installation, Storage, and Compute with Windows Server 2016: Microsoft Official Academic Course
  206. Principles of Athletic Training: A Guide to Evidence-Based Clinical Practice, 16th Edition: William Prentice
  207. Consumer Behavior, 12th Edition: Leon G. Schiffman & Joseph L. Wisenblit
  208. Prealgebra, 5th Edition: Marvin L. Bittinger & David J. Ellenbogen & Barbara L. Johnson
  209. Defensive Security Handbook: Best Practices for Securing Infrastructure, 1st Edition: Lee Brotherston & Amanda Berlin
  210. Writing Tools: 55 Essential Strategies for Every Writer, 1st Edition: Roy Peter Clark
  211. Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft (Penguin Academics Series), 1st Edition: Janet Burroway
  212. Concepts of Fitness And Wellness: A Comprehensive Lifestyle Approach, 11th Edition: Charles Corbin & Karen Welk & William Corbin & Gregory Welk
  213. Interpreting Earth History: A Manual in Historical Geology, 8th Edition: Scott Ritter & Morris Petersen
  214. Counseling the Culturally Diverse: Theory and Practice, 8th Edition: Derald Wing Sue & David Sue & Helen A. Neville & Laura Smith
  215. Investment Banking: Valuation, Leveraged Buyouts, and Mergers & Acquisitions: University Edition, 2nd Edition: Joshua Pearl & Joshua Rosenbaum
  216. Essentials of Geology, 6th Edition: Stephen Marshak
  217. The Personality Puzzle, 8th Edition: David C. Funder
  218. Strategic Human Resources Planning, 7th Edition: Monica Belcourt
  219. Human Anatomy, 5th Edition: Michael McKinley
  220. First Aid for the USMLE Step 2 CS, 6th Edition: Tao Le & Vikas Bhushan
  221. Career Theories and Models at Work: Ideas for Practice: Nancy Arthur & Roberta Neault & Mary McMahon
  222. Essential Cell Biology, 5th Edition: Bruce Alberts & Karen Hopkin & Alexander D. Johnson & David Morgan & Martin Raff & Keith Roberts & Peter Walter
  223. Children Moving:A Reflective Approach to Teaching Physical Education with Movement Analysis Wheel, 9th Edition: George Graham & Shirley Ann Holt/Hale & Melissa Parker
  224. Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, 4th Edition: Ross L. Finney & Franklin D. Demana & Bert K. Waits & Daniel Kennedy
  225. Foundations of Clinical and Counseling Psychology, 4th Edition: Judith Todd & Arthur C. Bohart
  226. Elements of Argument: A Text and Reader, 12th Edition: Annette T. Rottenberg & Donna Haisty Winchell
  227. 5 Steps to a 5 AP Chinese Language and Culture, 1st Edition: JianMin Luo
  228. Study Guide/Solutions Manual for Organic Chemistry: Structure and Function, 8th Edition: K. Peter C. Vollhardt & Neil E. Schore
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  230. Murach's Oracle SQL and PL/SQL for Developers, 2nd Edition: Joel Murach
  231. The Communication Playbook, 1st Edition: Gamble Teri Kwal & Gamble Michael W.
  232. Managing Human Resources, 9th Canadian Edition: Monica Belcourt & Parbudyal Singh & Scott Snell & Shad Morris
  233. The One-Hour Activist: The 15 Most Powerful Actions You Can Take to Fight for the Issues and Candidates You Care About, 1st Edition: Christopher Kush
  234. Contemporary Business, 17th Edition: Louis E. Boone & David L. Kurtz & Susan Berston
  235. Introduction to Heat Transfer, 6th Edition: Theodore L. Bergman & Adrienne S. Lavine & Frank P. Incropera
  236. The Making of Environmental Law, 1st Edition: Richard J. Lazarus
  237. The Elusive Eden: A New History of California, 5th Edition: Richard B. Rice & William A. Bullough & Richard J. Orsi & Mary Ann Irwin & Michael F. Magliari
  238. Systems Analysis and Design, 12th Edition: Scott Tilley
  239. Motivational Interviewing, 3rd Edition: William R. Miller & Stephen Rollnick
  240. Excellence in Business Communication, 13th Edition: John V. Thill & Courtland L. Bovee
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  242. Wrigley Regulars: Finding Community in the Bleachers: Holly Swyers
  243. The Price Advantage, 2nd Edition: Walter L. Baker & Michael V. Marn & Craig C. Zawada
  244. Corporate Finance: The Core, 2nd Edition: Jonathan Berk & Peter DeMarzo
  245. INCOSE Systems Engineering Handbook: A Guide for System Life Cycle Processes and Activities, 4th Edition: INCOSE
  246. Absolute Java, 6th Edition, Global Edition: Walter Savitch
  247. Exploring Unseen Worlds: William James and the Philosophy of Mysticism, 1st Edition: G. William Barnard
  248. Governing States and Localities, 7th Edition: Kevin B. Smith & Alan H. Greenblatt
  249. Interviewing in Action in a Multicultural World, 5th Edition: Bianca Cody Murphy & Carolyn Dillon
  250. Advocacy in the Human Services, 1st Edition: Mark Ezell
  251. Immunology: A Short Course, 7th Edition: Richard Coico & Geoffrey Sunshine
  252. Essential Logic for Computer Science: Rex Page & Ruben Gamboa
  253. Tested Advertising Methods, 5th Edition: Caples & Hahn
  254. BIM and Quantity Surveying, 1st Edition: Steve Pittard
  255. Retail Buying: From Basics to Fashion, 6th Edition: Richard Clodfelter
  256. A Project Manager's Book of Forms: A Companion to the PMBOK Guide, 3rd Edition: Cynthia Snyder Dionisio
  257. Textbook of Histology, 4th Edition: Leslie P. Gartner
  258. Autism: A New Introduction to Psychological Theory and Current Debate, 2nd Edition: Sue Fletcher-Watson & Francesca Happé
  259. Business and Society: Stakeholders, Ethics, Public Policy, 16th Edition: Anne Lawrence & James Weber
  260. Essentials of Nursing Law and Ethics, 2nd Edition: Susan J. Westrick
  261. Financial Accounting, 10th Edition: Robert Libby & Patricia Libby & Frank Hodge
  262. Intermediate Microeconomics: A Modern Approach, 9th Edition: Hal R. Varian
  263. Financial Markets and Institutions, 6th Edition: Anthony Saunders
  264. The Cosmos: Astronomy in the New Millennium, 5th Edition: Jay M. Pasachoff & Alex Filippenko
  265. Structural Analysis, SI Edition, 6th Edition: Aslam Kassimali
  266. Understanding and Treating Chronic Shame: A Relational/Neurobiological Approach, 1st Edition: Patricia A. DeYoung
  267. Leisure Services Management, 2nd Edition: Amy R. Hurd & Robert J. Barcelona & Jo An M. Zimmerman & Janet Ready
  268. Behavioral Problems in Geography Revisited, 1st Edition: Kevin R Cox & Reginald Golledge
  269. Public Finance and Public Policy, 6th Edition: Jonathan Gruber
  270. Introduction to Heat Transfer, 6th Edition: Theodore L. Bergman & Adrienne S. Lavine & Frank P. Incropera & David P. DeWitt
  271. Frequently Prescribed Medications: Drugs You Need to Know, 3rd Edition: Michael A. Mancano & Jason C. Gallagher
  272. The Economics of Health Reconsidered, 4th Edition: Thomas Rice
  273. Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: An Integrative Approach, 2nd Edition: Elsie Jones-Smith
  274. America's History, Value Edition, Combined Volume, 9th Edition: Rebecca Edwards & Eric Hinderaker & Robert Self & James A. Henretta
  275. Campbell Biology, 11th Edition: Lisa A. Urry & Michael L. Cain & Steven A. Wasserman & Peter V. Minorsky & Jane B. Reece
  276. Advertising: Concept and Copy, 3rd Edition: George Felton
  277. Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction, 10th Edition: William D. Callister & David G. Rethwisch
  278. Understanding Business, 11th Edition: William Nickels & James McHugh & Susan McHugh
  279. Microsoft Excel 2019 Data Analysis and Business Modeling, 6th Edition: Wayne Winston
  280. Essentials of Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy, 4th Edition: Ellen Hillegass
  281. Guide to Managerial Communication, 10th Edition: Mary Munter & Lynn Hamilton
  282. You Don't Need a Title to Be a Leader: How Anyone, Anywhere, Can Make a Positive Difference: Mark Sanborn
  283. Business Communication: A Problem-Solving Approach, 1st Edition: Kathryn Rentz
  284. Leadership and Management for Nurses: Core Competencies for Quality Care, 3rd Edition: Anita Finkelman
  285. Governing California in the Twenty-First Century, 7th Edition: J. Theodore Anagnoson & Gerald Bonetto & J. Vincent Buck & James J. Kelleher
  286. Investment Valuation: Tools and Techniques for Determining the Value of Any Asset, 3rd Edition: Aswath Damodaran
  287. Communication Sciences and Disorders: From Science to Clinical Practice, 4th Edition: Ronald B. Gillam & Thomas P. Marquardt
  288. Entrepreneurship, 5th Asia-Pacific Edition: Howard Frederick & Allan O'Connor & Donald F. Kuratko
  289. Exploring Microsoft Office Excel 2019 Comprehensive, 1st Edition: Mary Anne Poatsy & Keith Mulbery & Jason Davidson
  290. Records Management, 10th Edition: Judith Read & Mary Lea Ginn
  291. Essentials of Accounting, 11th Edition: Leslie K. Breitner & Robert N. Anthony
  292. Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction, 2nd Edition: David Poole
  293. University Physics with Modern Physics, 15th Edition: Hugh D. Young & Roger A. Freedman
  294. Fundamentals of Physical Geography, 2nd Edition: James Petersen & Dorothy Sack & Robert E. Gabler
  295. Chemical Fate and Transport in the Environment, 3rd Edition: Harold F. Hemond & Elizabeth J. Fechner
  296. Educational Psychology, 7th Canadian edition: Anita Woolfolk & Philip H. Winne & Nancy E. Perry
  297. Public Policy: A New Introduction, 2012 Edition: Christoph Knill & Jale Tosun
  298. Women and the American Experience, 5th Edition: Nancy Woloch
  299. Pediatric Primary Care, 6th Edition: Catherine E. Burns & Ardys M. Dunn & Margaret A. Brady & Nancy Barber Starr & Catherine G. Blosser & Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks
  300. The Scholar-Practitioner’s Guide to Research Design, 1st Edition: Laureate Publishing & Gary J. Burkholder & Kimberley A. Cox & Linda M. Crawford
  301. When Crime Pays: Money and Muscle in Indian Politics, 1st Edition: Milan Vaishnav
  302. Windows Server 2016 Unleashed, 1st Edition: Rand Morimoto & Jeffrey Shapiro & Guy Yardeni & Omar Droubi & Michael Noel & Andrew Abbate & Chris Amaris
  303. Motivation: Biological, Psychological, and Environmental, 5th Edition: Lambert Deckers
  304. Explorations in Diversity: Examining Privilege and Oppression in a Multicultural Society, 2nd Edition: Sharon K. Anderson & Valerie A. Middleton
  305. Introduction to Strategic Public Relations: Digital, Global, and Socially Responsible Communication, 1st Edition: Janis Teruggi Page & Lawrence J. Parnell
  306. A Comprehensive Guide to Project Management Schedule and Cost Control: Methods and Models for Managing the Project Lifecycle, 1st Edition: Randal Wilson
  307. You May Ask Yourself: An Introduction to Thinking like a Sociologist, 6th Edition: Dalton Conley
  308. The Basic Practice of Statistics for AP, 5th Edition: Daren S. Starnes & David S. Moore & Dan Yates
  309. The Power of Framing: Creating the Language of Leadership, 2nd Edition: Gail T. Fairhurst
  310. Lubkin's Chronic Illness: Impact and Intervention, 10th Edition: Pamala D. Larsen
  311. Financial Accounting, 10th Edition: Robert Libby & Patricia Libby & Frank Hodge
  312. Introduction to Software Testing, 2nd Edition: Paul Ammann & Jeff Offutt
  313. A Practical Guide to Computer Forensics Investigations, 1st Edition: Darren R. Hayes
  314. Henke's Med-Math: Dosage Calculation, Preparation, & Administration, 9th Edition: Susan Buchholz
  315. Doing Right: A Practical Guide to Ethics for Medical Trainees and Physicians, 3rd Edition: Philip C. Hebert
  316. Auditing and Assurance Services, 17th Edition: Alvin A. Arens & Randal J. Elder & Mark S. Beasley & Chris E. Hogan
  317. Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting: Concepts and Practices, 8th Edition: Michael H. Granof & Saleha B. Khumawala & Thad D. Calabrese & Daniel L. Smith
  318. A History of World Societies, Concise, Volume 2, 11th Edition: Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks & Ebrey Patricia B. & Roger B. Beck
  319. The Developing Child, 13th Edition: Helen Bee & Denise Boyd
  320. High-Acuity Nursing, 7th Edition: Kathleen Dorman Wagner & Melanie Hardin-Pierce & Darlene Welsh & Karen Johnson
  321. Linear Algebra, 5th Edition: Stephen H. Friedberg & Arnold J. Insel & Lawrence E. Spence
  322. Sources of World Societies, Volume 1, 3rd Edition: Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks & Patricia Buckley Ebrey & Roger B. Beck & Jerry Davila & Clare Haru Crowston & John P. McKay
  323. Digital Forensics Workbook: Hands-on Activities in Digital Forensics: Michael Robinson
  324. Jonas and Kovner's Health Care Delivery in the United States, 12th Edition: James R. Knickman & Brian Elbel
  325. Introduction to Neuropsychopharmacology, 1st Edition: Leslie Iversen & Susan Iversen & Floyd E. Bloom & Robert H. Roth
  326. Weight Training for Life, 10th Edition: James L. Hesson
  327. Your Career: How To Make It Happen, 9th Edition: Lauri Harwood & Lisa M.D. Owens & Crystal Kadakia
  328. Services Marketing: Integrating Customer Focus Across the Firm, 7th Edition: Valarie A. Zeithaml & Mary Jo Bitner & Dwayne Gremler
  329. States Versus Markets: Understanding the Global Economy, 4th Edition: Herman Mark Schwartz
  330. Cybercrime: Investigating High-Technology Computer Crime, 2nd Edition: Robert Moore
  331. Essentials of Exercise Physiology, 5th Edition: William D. McArdle & Frank I. Katch & Victor L. Katch
  332. NoSQL for Mere Mortals, 1st Edition: Dan Sullivan
  333. Architectural Drafting and Design, 7th Edition: Alan Jefferis & David A. Madsen & David P. Madsen
  334. Calculus, 8th Edition: James Stewart
  335. Principles of Microeconomics, 12th Edition: Karl E. Case & Ray C. Fair & Sharon E. Oster
  336. MIS Cases: Decision Making wih Application Software, 4th Edition: Lisa Miller
  337. Auditing: A Practical Approach with Data Analytics, 1st Edition: Raymond N. Johnson & Laura Davis Wiley & Robyn Moroney & Fiona Campbell & Jane Hamilton
  338. South-Western Federal Taxation 2020: Essentials of Taxation: Individuals and Business Entities, 23rd Edition: Annette Nellen & James C. Young & William A. Raabe & David M. Maloney
  339. Student Solutions Manual for McKeague/Turner's Trigonometry, 8th Edition: Charles P. McKeague & Mark D. Turner
  340. Psychology in Your Life, 3rd Edition: Michael Gazzaniga & Sarah Grison
  341. American Courts: Process and Policy, 7th Edition: Lawrence Baum
  342. An Introduction to American Law, 3rd Edition: Daniel Rosen & Bruce Aronson & David G. Litt & Gerald Paul McAlinn & John P. Stern
  343. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th Edition: American Psychological Association
  344. Doing Ethics: Moral Reasoning, Theory, and Contemporary Issues, 5th Edition: Lewis Vaughn
  345. Intermediate Algebra: Functions & Authentic Applications, 6th Edition: Jay Lehmann
  346. General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry: Structures of Life, 5th Edition: Karen C. Timberlake
  347. Basics of Research Methods for Criminal Justice and Criminology, 4th Edition: Michael G. Maxfield
  348. Nature Unbound: Bureaucracy vs. the Environment (Independent Studies in Political Economy): Kenneth J. Sim & Randy T Simmons & Ryan M. Yonk
  349. Contemporary Criminal Law: Concepts, Cases, and Controversies, 5th Edition: Matthew Lippman
  350. Engineering Your Future: A Comprehensive Introduction to Engineering, 9th Edition: William C. Oakes & Les L. Leone
submitted by TailExpert to CollegeTextbook [link] [comments]

NPR parroting FDA fearmongering

Copy and pasted to remove a vendor reference. Not terrible article, but they're still parroting the lies. It's pretty disingenuous to offer up the story of one kid that clearly had major substance abuse problems as the "other side".
Side comment / vent -- I feel censoring regular mainstream news stories just because it breaks the no vendor rule is nuts. If anything the story should be allowed but comments locked.

The Kratom Debate: Helpful Herb Or Dangerous Drug?

Americans know the dangers of drugs such as morphine and heroin. But what about a supplement that acts in the brain a bit like an opiate and is available in many places to kids — even from vending machines.

Kratom, an herb that's abundant, legal in most states and potentially dangerous, is the subject of an ongoing debate over its risks and benefits.

Usually, the leaf, which comes from a tropical Southeast Asian tree, is chewed, brewed or crushed into a bitter green powder. The chemicals in the herb interact with different types of receptors in the brain — some that respond to opioids, and others to stimulants. Often sold in the U.S. in a processed form — as pills, capsules or extracts — a small amount of kratom can perk you up, while a large dose has a sedative effect.

Some people who have struggled with an opioid addiction and switched to kratom swear the substance salvaged their health, livelihood and relationships.

But the federal Food and Drug Administration and the Drug Enforcement Administration worry that kratom carries the risk of physical and psychological dependency and, in some people, addiction. The FDA warns consumers not to use kratom, and the DEA threatened to prohibit kratom's sale and use in the U.S. (outside of research) in 2016; advocates and lawmakers subsequently pushed back, and the stricter scheduling of kratom that would have prompted that sort of ban never occurred. These days, the DEA lists it as a drug of concern.

Linda Kline, 33, based in Reno, Nev., sells kratom for a living. She says her several stores throughout the West have given her a new purpose in life. And while she herself doesn't have an opioid dependency, she credits kratom with turning around her mental health.

"I went from feeling desperate and hopeless to finding an alternative where I had full control over how I felt," she says.

She used to be paralyzed by anxiety and panic attacks. When her insurance carrier threatened to cut her Prozac prescription, she felt desperate. A friend suggested kratom, so she picked some up at a smoke shop.

"It almost feels like you're having just a little glass of wine," Kline says. "It's really relaxing. There's no melting of the walls."

The new habit cost about $6 a day — less than a glass of wine or fancy cup of coffee. But Kline says she couldn't always find a high-quality supply. The FDA has recalled dozens of salmonella-tainted products sold online or in convenience stores. The agency has also found toxic heavy metals in kratom supplements.

That's one reason Kline started her own chic boutiques, \redacted*, devoted exclusively to kratom products that, she says, are all lab tested to ensure purity. She just opened her fifth location in less than two years. The shops offer 15 kratom strains at outlets in California, Idaho and Nevada.*

Though Kline's website has a disclaimer that her products have not been evaluated by the FDA and "are not intended to cure, treat or prevent any disease/illness," some of her clients' online Yelp reviews claim kratom has dramatically relieved their chronic pain, insomnia, restless legs syndrome and more.

Potential dangers

Glowing reviews like that haunt Mateo Martinez.

"My brother believed the marketing of kratom — that it was a natural herbal supplement that could provide you with the same benefits of an opioid without the risks," Mateo says.

Mateo's younger brother, Marco, struggled with an opioid addiction in high school. Mateo describes Marco as a charismatic, creative teen, passionate about video games, cartoons and anime. Marco got hooked on painkillers, Mateo says, after his dentist pulled his wisdom teeth.

"He was using them in a way that wasn't just for treating pain," Mateo says.

Email receipts show Marco used bitcoin to also buy Vicodin and fentanyl on the dark web.

Eventually Marco wanted to kick his opioid addiction and saw testimonials on YouTube and Reddit that promised that kratom could be a way out. Soon Marco was popping kratom capsules multiple times a day.

During his freshman year at the University of California, Davis, the 19-year-old started hyperventilating regularly. The incidents worsened, becoming seizure-like episodes and ending in trips to the emergency room. During each hospitalization, the doctors were stumped. No one thought to test for kratom.

Marco died in his UC Davis dorm in February 2018, late on a Sunday night. The toxicology report listed "acute mitragynine intoxication" — a chemical constituent of kratom — as the cause of death.

"I think kratom needs to come with a much more serious caution that it is not harmless," Mateo says. "I'm very heartbroken."

In a recent 18-month period, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 90 kratom overdoses, although most involved a combination of other substances too.

Slim science, so far

"The data to support either the benefits or the harms for kratom is really, really poor," says C. Michael White, head of the Department of Pharmacy Practice at the University of Connecticut. "A lot of the information we have comes from single-case reports."

FDA Orders An Unprecedented Recall After Kratom Company Ignored Its Requests
THE TWO-WAY
FDA Orders An Unprecedented Recall After Kratom Company Ignored Its Requests
White says that animal studies suggest kratom could be an effective pain reliever, but the collection of human data has only just begun. He says scientists need to conduct a lot more research before the appropriate level of regulation is clear. White recently argued in the American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy that the safest place for kratom is behind pharmacy counters, for adults only, but with no prescription required.

McClain Haddow, spokesperson for the American Kratom Association, agrees that the product should be sold only to people over age 18.

"We would like vendors to register their product with the FDA and get a chemical analysis from a certified lab to insure the only ingredient is the naturally occurring alkaloid in the kratom plant," Haddow says. "Some manufacturers are spiking products with fentanyl, heroin or morphine to give users a high."

Dr. Scott Steiger, deputy medical director of the opiate treatment outpatient program at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center, says he doesn't know how to advise patients who want to use kratom.

"I tell them I just don't know enough on the basis of science to tell them whether it's a great idea or not," says Steiger, who is also an associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

The DEA describes kratom as an addictive substance that causes hallucinations, delusion and confusion.

"I have seen that people who use kratom end up having a very hard time stopping the use of it," says Steiger.

His patients report withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, sweats, aches and pains, loose stool, tearing and dysphoria. There is growing concern about kratom's effects on the heart and liver.

Steiger emphasizes that doctors have evidence-based treatments like buprenorphine and methadone to help people with an opioid addiction. He doesn't recommend self-medicating with kratom until more research is available.

"We just don't know enough about this chemical and the long-term use of it to know whether experimenting would lead to complications," Steiger says.
submitted by whatssocomplicated to kratom [link] [comments]

Weekly Update: Parachute Townhall, Welcome $GET to ParJar, Uptrennd reaches 50k members, Fantom on IncognitoChain... – 6 Dec - 12 Dec'19

Weekly Update: Parachute Townhall, Welcome $GET to ParJar, Uptrennd reaches 50k members, Fantom on IncognitoChain... – 6 Dec - 12 Dec'19
Hi Parachuters! As part of 2 of 3 from today's rapid catch up series of pending updates, here’s your week at Parachute + partners (6 Dec - 12 Dec'19):

As mentioned last week, Cap and Ice hosted a townhall to talk about where we are at and where we are heading along with ample feedback and Q&A from the community. We covered a lot of ground: "value hypothesis for ParJar, Product Market fit, and our growth approach for 2020...performance of two key PAR utility metrics, staking and gas, and how we see growth for each in 2020...questions from the community and reviewed upcoming community initiatives". Click here to catch up on all that happened. GET Protocol’s $GET token was added to ParJar this week. Belated Birthday wishes to Doc Vic from Cuba. Jason lost a 5k $PAR wager with Cap on Victor’s age. Haha. Congratulations to Martha for winning this week’s Parena. As per the latest Fantasy Premier League (#FPL) update shared by LordHades this week, he is still ruling the charts at the top with NovelCloud and Alexis hot on his heels. From next week, "You can now view your first opponent in the 2019/20 FPL Cup on the My Team page - under Leagues". While you slay those miles with the Parachute Running Club (which has done 44 miles so far BTW), here’s a podcast to listen to. Cap’s recommendation: "It's geared towards people building products - but super super useful to think about any products you use. Skip to like 9 minutes in to skip through all the advertiesments ". Yes, I know. Cap wouldn’t be Cap without typos. Typos FTW!
Parachute townhall
Parachute-themed shirts designed by Doc Vic and Alejandro on Doc’s birthday. These are sick!
If you want to see yourself on the Parachute world map, make sure to enter your location here. The entries are anonymous. In this week's Parachute Fantasy Football League update, Hang is in the first position followed by Clinton and Andy. Connor made it to the playoffs and is now in 4th position. So it means farewell to Nilz, Ken, Kamo and Cap from this season. CoD mobile players, don't forget to join the Parachute WarZone hosted by Doc Vic from Cuba. I hear there's $PAR and $AMGO to be won! The TTR Hat Contest ended this week with some solid entries running in the lead. Epic creation Wendell! In this week’s creative prompt by Jason, Parachuters had to “do 3 nice things for a total stranger”. Basically, be a true blue Parachuter 😊. For this week's Two-for-Tuesday, Gian made it free-for-all. No theme. Post music as you wish and win 500 $PAR. Cool! Benjamin and Charlotte hosted trivias in TTR this week. Those were loads of fun! Andy announced the start of a College Football Bowl Game Pickem contest in Parachute. 100k $PAR prize pool. Doc Vic hosted another round of Champions League wager this week in TTR.
So much epicness in one picture. Jose, you are a genius!
Andy's Advent Calendar journey continues
Catch up on the latest aXpire update and 20k AXPR burn here and here respectively. As you would already know, instead of pitting both startups against each other, XIO decided to accept both Opacity and Uptrennd into the incubator program and opened up staking for them. This marks the official launch of the XIO Blockchain Incubator and it’s been a roaring start with USD 7k worth of tokens locked up in one hour and Opacity portal getting oversubscribed in no time. Video instructions for staking can be found here. Read up on the startups here. In three days, the total staking crossed 1M XIO levels. Insane! That is a great metric to measure performance. How does the $XIO token play a role in all this? The crew explained in this tweet thread. And with that a series of related discussions got off starting with the possibility of self-nomination for startups. Have a sub-100 CMC project that you think should be part of the incubator? Don’t forget to tag them. Plus, a cool 25k $XIO giveaway was launched. Remember, meaningful conversation is always welcome at the incubator and more often than not, they get rewarded. Check out the latest update on the Birdchain App SMS feature along with an expanded list of supported countries. Silent Notary reduced the $LAW token requirement for running a Masternode from 100M to 20M this week. Russian research company sudexpa.ru also gave its vote of confidence to Silent Notary in terms of its immutability. Wibson Marketing Manager Fi Scantamburlo attended the Latin American Bitcoin Conference Uruguay to speak on Data privacy, monetisation and how Wibson helps achieve these. Opacity now allows shared file preview for uploaded docs.
Shared File Preview on Opacity
Fantom's foray into the Afghan Ministry of Health's efforts to fight counterfeit drugs and other public health initiatives were covered by Forbes this week. Last week, we shared that Sikoba's e-voting platform, Itugen, which is based on Fantom’s Lachesis consensus was released. This week, they published its technical whitepaper. With so many moving parts in the project and so much happening all around, a recap is always a welcome refresher to catch up. $FTM got listed on South Korea’s Coinone with a $KRW pairing. It was also integrated with the IncognitoChain project’s pDEX with a $pUSDT pairing (remember, Harmony was added to the same platform a few days back?). IncognitoChain allows cryptos to be transacted privately using sidechains including those coins/tokens which are not privacy-oriented. Fantom also launched a developer portal and technical documentation ahead of the XAR Network mainnet release. The interoperability bridge is out as well. This allows both ERC20 and BEP2 token holders to move their tokens to the XAR Network. The wallet allows both staking and delegation. For the guide to joining XAR Network as a validator node, click here. A simple guide to staking on XAR Network can be found here. The team also sat down for an AMA with COTI this week. Blockchain Magazine’s interview of Michael was published. Continuing with Uptrennd’s 24 Days of Celebrations started last week, this week they hosted an Escape Room contest and Photo contest. The latest $1UP tokenomics update can be seen here. After 11 months, the platform now has 50k users across 177 countries. Wowza! And wicked stats on the engagement metrics as well. Jeff’s interview with Crypto Beadles came out this week.
A few entries for the Uptrennd Photo Contest
Click here and here for the latest District Weekly and Dev Update from District0x. In case you missed this week’s Dapp Digest, you can watch it here. Aragon fans will be in for a treat since it features Aragon Co-Founder Luis Cuende as a special guest. Remember, we had discussed last week that the Shuffle Monster Raffle had crossed a 10k $SHUF pool. Turns out it got to 13k+. Wow! The latest Hydro developer update is a comprehensive roundup from the entire ecosystem. VCC Exchange listed $HYDRO with a $BTC pairing. Hydro’s security tokenisation protocol, Hail, moved to mainnet this week. The team travelled to Boston for MassChallenge Fintech. Hydro will be hosting a Banking-as-a-Service happy hour next week to talk on how they are building solutions in the BaaS space. For starters, don’t forget to read their article on blockchain applications in finance. The team appeared for an AMA with Apache Traders which also featured a 45k $HYDRO giveaway. Digital payments platform VoPay is now partnered with Hydro for end-to-end payment solutions using Hydrogen API and other Hydro tools. Hydro’s smart contract was audited by Callisto and passed their test with flying colours except for one "low severity" issue. The result: "The contract can be deployed". CTO Tim Allard was interviewed by Ethereum Network Nigeria as part of their Ethereum personality chat series. For the latest update on the community explorer Frost, click here. In Pynk’s first guest blog post, community member (or, Pynkster) Alistaire Wallace talks about what the coming year could hold for Pynk and its community of predictors. Check out the transcript of Sentivate’s AMA with tehMoonwalkeR here.
Sentivate’s new office in PA is shaping up quite well
This week at OST was all about the Pepo app: from angel investor Kartik to Rocket NFT’s Alex Masmej joining the platform, accelerator The Fledge using Pepo Conversations to power community-sourced improvements to businesses, Home for the Holidays Challenge to explain crypto/blockchain to relatives (with a total USD 2k in Pepo coins in prizes) and a “best lifehack” bounty posted by Jason on the app. If you’ve missed all SelfKey news from the past month, you can catch up from the November progress report. Also, did you know that the group Legion of Doom which was once considered to be the most capable hacking group in the world was in a long drawn feud with Masters of Deception in what is now known as the Great Hacker War? Learn more info like this from SelfKey’s latest article on hacking groups. Constellation CEO Ben Jorgensen will be speaking at the Crypto 2020 Summit. If you’re attending, make sure to say Hi. Arena Match announced a trading competition on DDEX with 4M $AMGO tokens to be won. Lucky Bluff Poker will be sponsoring next week’s Arena Match Raffle. The latest Harmony update compilation from the whole team can be found here. In the latest Pangea statistics (Harmony’s experimental staking game to test the limits of its tech), the average staking position is 1.8M $ONE with 75% of participants operate nodes themselves while the rest use delegates. Plus, check out the newest upgrades here. Honest Mining announced mainnet support for the native $ONE token swap. $ONE is also in consideration for listing on Binance US. The token was listed on Pionex this week. The Intellishare website registration and login functions will be down next week for a scheduled upgrade. Also, $INE traders make sure to keep a note of WBFex temporarily disabling the $ETH trading pair. Jobchain’s $JOB token got listed on Bilaxy exchange, P2PB2B exchange, SWFT Blockchain wallet and SWOP.SPACE exchange. The project was also given an A+ score by Xangle. Congrats!

And with that, it’s a wrap. See you again soon with another weekly update. Bye!
submitted by abhijoysarkar to ParachuteToken [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency: A Guide to Common Tax Situations

STATUS: Majority of questions have been answered. If yours got missed, please feel free to post it again.
Introduction
All,
Based on the rapid increase in popularity and price of bitcoin and other crypto currencies (particularly over the past year), I expect that lots of people have questions about how crypto currency will impact their taxes. This thread attempts to address several common issues. I'm posting similar versions of it here, in several major crypto subs, and eventually in the weekly "tax help" threads personalfinance runs.
I'd like to thank the /personalfinance mod team and the /tax community for their help with this thread and especially for reading earlier versions and offering several valuable suggestions/corrections.
This thread is NOT an endorsement of crypto currency as an investing strategy. There is a time and a place to debate the appropriateness of crypto as part of a diversified portfolio - but that time is not now and that place is not here. If you are interested in the general consensus of this sub on investing, I would urge you to consult the wiki while keeping in mind the general flowchart outlining basic steps to get your finances in order.
Finally, please note that this thread attempts to provide information about your tax obligations as defined by United States law (and interpreted by the IRS under the direction of the Treasury Department). I understand that a certain portion of the crypto community tends to view crypto as "tax free" due to the (actual and perceived) difficulty for the IRS to "know" about the transactions involved. I will not discuss unlawfully concealing crypto gains here nor will I suggest illegal tax avoidance activities.
The Basics
This section is best for people that don't understand much about taxes. It covers some very basic tax principles. It also assumes that all you did during the year was buy/sell a single crypto currency.
Fundamentally, the IRS treats crypto not as money, but as an asset (investment). While there are a few specific "twists" when it comes to crypto, when in doubt replace the word "crypto" with the word "stock" and you will get a pretty good idea how you should report and pay tax on crypto.
The first thing you should know is that the majority of this discussion applies to the taxes you are currently working on (2017 taxes). The tax bill that just passed applies to 2018 taxes (with a few very tiny exceptions), which most people will file in early 2019.
In general, you don't have to report or pay taxes on crypto currency holdings until you "cash out" all or part of your holdings. For now, I'm going to assume that you cash out by selling them for USD; however, other forms of cashing out will be covered later.
When you sell crypto, you report the difference between your basis (purchase price) and proceeds (sale price) on Schedule D. Your purchase price is commonly referred to as your basis; while the two terms don't mean exactly the same thing, they are pretty close to one another (in particular, there are three two ways to calculate your basis - your average cost, a first-in, first-out method, and a "specific identification" method. See more about these here and here). EDIT - you may not use average cost method with crypto - see here. If you sell at a gain, this gain increases your tax liability; if you sell at a loss, this loss decreases your tax liability (in most cases). If you sell multiple times during the year, you report each transaction separately (bad news if you trade often) but get to lump all your gains/losses together when determining how the trades impact your income.
One important thing to remember is that there are two different types of gains/losses from investments - short term gains (if you held an asset for one year or less) and long term gains (over one year; i.e. one year and one day). Short term gains are taxed at your marginal income rate (basically, just like if you had earned that money at a job) while long term gains are taxed at lower rates.
For most people, long term capital gains are taxed at 15%. However, if you are in the 10% or 15% tax bracket, congrats - your gains (up to the maximum amount of "unused space" in your bracket) are tax free! If you are in the 25%, 28%, 33%, or 35% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 15%. If you are in the 39.6% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 20%. Additionally, there is an "extra" 3.8% tax that applies to gains for those above $200,000/$250,000 (single/married). The exact computation of this tax is a little complicated, but if you are close to the $200,000 level, just know that it exists.
Finally, you should know that I'm assuming that you should treat your crypto gains/losses as investment gains/losses. I'm sure some people will try and argue that they are really "day traders" of crypto and trade as a full time job. While this is possible, the vast majority of people don't qualify for this status and you should really think several times before deciding you want to try that approach on the IRS.
"Cashing Out" - Trading Crypto for Goods/Services
I realize that not everyone that "cashes out" of crypto does so by selling it for USD. In fact, I understand that some in the crypto community view the necessity of cashing out itself as a type of myth. In this section, I discuss what happens if you trade your crypto for basically anything that isn't cash (minor sidenote - see next section for a special discussion on trading crypto for crypto; i.e. buying altcoins with crypto).
The IRS views trading crypto for something of value as a type of bartering that must be included in income. From the IRS's perspective, it doesn't matter if you sold crypto for cash and bought a car with that cash or if you just traded crypto directly for the car - in both cases, the IRS views you as having sold your crypto. This approach isn't unique to crypto - it works the same way if you trade stock for something.
This means that if you do trade your crypto for "stuff", you have to report every exchange as a sale of your crypto and calculate the gain/loss on that sale, just as if you had sold the crypto for cash.
Finally, there is one important exception to this rule. If you give your crypto away to charity (one recognized by the IRS; like a 501(c)(3) organization), the IRS doesn't make you report/pay any capital gains on the transaction. Additionally, you still get to deduct the value of your donation on the date it was made. Now, from a "selfish" point of view, you will always end up with more money if you sell the crypto, pay the tax, and keep the rest. But, if you are going to make a donation anyway, especially a large one, giving crypto where you have a big unrealized/untaxed gain is a very efficient way of doing so.
"Alt Coins" - Buying Crypto with Crypto
The previous section discusses what happens when you trade crypto for stuff. However, one thing that surprises many people is that trading crypto for crypto is also a taxable event, just like trading crypto for a car. Whether you agree with this position or not, it makes a lot of sense once you realize that the IRS doesn't view crypto as money, but instead as an asset. So to the IRS, trading bitcoin for ripple isn't like trading dollars for euros, but it is instead like trading shares of Apple stock for shares of Tesla stock.
Practically, what this means is that if you trade one crypto for another crypto (say BTC for XRP just to illustrate the point), the IRS views you as doing the following:
  • Selling for cash the amount of BTC you actually traded for XRP.
  • Owing capital gains/losses on the BTC based on its selling price (the fair market value at the moment of the exchange) and your purchase price (basis).
  • Buying a new investment (XRP) with a cost basis equal to the amount the BTC was worth when you exchanged them.
This means that if you "time" your trade wrong and the value of XRP goes down after you make the exchange, you still owe tax on your BTC gain even though you subsequently lost money. The one good piece of news in this is that when/if you sell your XRP (or change it back to BTC), you will get a capital loss for the value that XRP dropped.
There is one final point worth discussing in this section - the so called "like kind exchange" rules (aka section 1031 exchange). At a high level, these rules say that you can "swap" property with someone else without having to pay taxes on the exchange as long as you get property in return that is "like kind". Typically, these rules are used in real estate transactions. However, they can also apply to other types of transactions as well.
While the idea is simple (and makes it sound like crypto for crypto should qualify), the exact rules/details of this exception are very fact specific. Most experts (including myself, but certainly not calling myself an expert) believe that a crypto for crypto swap is not a like kind exchange. The recently passed tax bill also explicitly clarifies this issue - starting in 2018, only real estate qualifies for like kind exchange treatment. So, basically, the vast majority of evidence suggests that you can't use this "loophole" for 2017; however, there is a small minority view/some small amount of belief that this treatment would work for 2017 taxes and it is worth noting that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this approach.
Dealing with "Forks"
Perhaps another unpleasant surprise for crypto holders is that "forks" to create a new crypto also very likely generate a taxable event. The IRS has long (since at least the 1960s) held that "found" money is a taxable event. This approach has been litigated in court and courts have consistently upheld this position; it even has its own cool nerdy tax name - the "treasure trove" doctrine.
Practically, what this means is that if you owned BTC and it "forked" to create BCH, then the fair market value of the BCH you received is considered a "treasure trove" that must be reported as income (ordinary income - no capital gain rates). This is true whether or not you sold your BCH; if you got BCH from a fork, that is a taxable event (note - I'll continue using BTC forking to BCH in this section as an example, but the logic applies to all forks).
While everything I've discussed up to this point is pretty clearly established tax law, forks are really where things get messy with taxes. Thus, the remainder of this section contains more speculation than elsewhere in this post - the truth is that while the idea is simple (fork = free money = taxable), the details are messy and other kinds of tax treatment might apply to forks.
One basic practical problem with forks is that the new currency doesn't necessarily start trading immediately. Thus, you may have received BCH before there was a clear price or market for it. Basically, you owe tax on the value of BCH when you received it, but it isn't completely clear what that value was. There are several ways you can handle this; I'll list them in order from most accurate to least accurate (but note that this is just my personal view and there is ongoing disagreement on this issue with little/no authoritative guidance).
  • Use a futures market to determine the value of the BCH - if reliable sources published realistic estimates of what BCH will trade for in the future once trading begins, use this estimate as the value of your BCH. Pros/cons - futures markets are, in theory, pretty accurate. However, if they are volatile/subject to manipulation, they may provide an incorrect estimate of the true value of BCH. It would suck to use the first futures value published only to have that value plummet shortly thereafter, leaving you to pay ordinary income tax but only have an unrealized capital loss.
  • Wait until an exchange starts trading BCH; use the actual ("spot" price) as the value. Pros/cons - spot prices certainly reflect what you could have sold BCH for; however, it is possible that the true value of the coin was highelower when you received it as compared to when it started trading on the exchange. Thus this method seems less accurate to me than a futures based approach, but it is still certainly fairly reasonable.
  • Assume that the value is $0. This is my least preferred option, but there is still a case to be made for it. If you receive something that you didn't want, can't access, can't sell, and might fail, does it have any value? I believe the answer is yes (maybe not value it perfectly, but value it somewhat accurately), but if you honestly think the answer is no, then the correct tax answer would be to report $0 in income from the fork. The IRS would be most likely to disagree with this approach, especially since it results in the least amount of income reported for the current year (and the most favorable rates going forward). Accordingly, if you go this route, make extra sure you understand what it entails.
Note, once you've decided what to report as taxable income, this amount also becomes your cost basis in the new crypto (BCH). Thus, when you ultimately sell your BCH (or trade it for something else as described above), you calculate your gain/loss based on what you included in taxable income from the fork.
Finally, there is one more approach to dealing with forks worth mentioning. A fork "feels" a lot like a dividend - because you held BTC, you get BCH. In a stock world, if I get a cash dividend because I own the stock, that money is not treated as a "treasure trove" and subject to ordinary income rates - in most cases, it is a qualified dividend and subject to capital gain rates; in some cases, some types of stock dividends are completely non taxable. This article discusses this idea in slightly more detail and generally concludes that forks should not be treated as a dividend. Still, I would note that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this theory.
Ultimately, this post is supposed to be practical, so let me make sure to leave you with two key thoughts about the taxation of forks. First, I believe that the majority of evidence suggests that forks should be treated as a "treasure trove" and reported as ordinary income based on their value at creation and that this is certainly the "safest" option. Second, out of everything discussed in this post, I also believe that the correct taxation of forks is the murkiest and most "up for debate" area. If you are interested in a more detailed discussion of forks, see this thread for a previous version of this post discussing it at even more length and the comments for a discussion of this with the tax community.
Mining Crypto
Successfully mining crypto coins is a taxable event. Depending on the amount of effort you put into mining, it is either considered a hobby or a self-employment (business) activity. The IRS provides the following list of questions to help decide the correct classification:
  • The manner in which the taxpayer carries on the activity.
  • The expertise of the taxpayer or his advisors.
  • The time and effort expended by the taxpayer in carrying on the activity.
  • Expectation that assets used in activity may appreciate in value.
  • The success of the taxpayer in carrying on other similar or dissimilar activities.
  • The taxpayer’s history of income or losses with respect to the activity.
  • The amount of occasional profits, if any, which are earned.
If this still sounds complicated, that's because the distinction is subject to some amount of interpretation. As a rule of thumb, randomly mining crypto on an old computer is probably a hobby; mining full time on a custom rig is probably a business.
In either event, you must include in income the fair market value of any coins you successfully mine. These are ordinary income and your basis in these coins is their fair market value on the date they were mined. If your mining is a hobby, they go on line 21 (other income) and any expenses directly associated with mining go on schedule A (miscellaneous subject to 2% of AGI limitation). If your mining is a business, income and expenses go on schedule C.
Both approaches have pros and cons - hobby income isn't subject to the 15.3% self-employment tax, only normal income tax, but you get fewer deductions against your income and the deductions you get are less valuable. Business income has more deductions available, but you have to pay payroll (self-employment) tax of about 15.3% in addition to normal income tax.
What if I didn't keep good records? Do I really have to report every transaction?
One nice thing about the IRS treating crypto as an asset is that we can look at how the IRS treats people that "day trade" stock and often don't keep great records/have lots of transactions. While you need to be as accurate as possible, it is ok to estimate a little bit if you don't have exact records (especially concerning your cost basis). You need to put in some effort (research historical prices, etc...) and be reasonable, but the IRS would much rather you do a little bit of reasonable estimation as opposed to just not reporting anything. Sure, they might decide to audit you/disagree with some specifics, but you earn yourself a lot of credit if you can show that you honestly did the best you reasonably could and are making efforts to improve going forward.
However, concerning reporting every transaction - yes, sorry, it is clear that you have to do this, even if you made hundreds or thousands of them. Stock traders have had to go through this for many decades, and there is absolutely no reason to believe that the IRS would accept anything less from the crypto community. If you have the records or have any reasonable way of obtaining records/estimating them, you must report every transaction.
What if I don't trust you?
Well, first let me say that I can't believe you made it all the way down here to this section. Thanks for giving me an honest hearing. I would strongly encourage you to go read other well-written, honest guides. I'll link to some I like (both more technical IRS type guides and more crypto community driven guides). While a certain portion of the crypto community seems to view one of the benefits of crypto as avoiding all government regulation (including taxes), I've been pleasantly surprised to find that many crypto forums contain well reasoned, accurate tax guides. While I may not agree with 100% of their conclusions, that likely reflects true uncertainty around tax law that is fundamentally complex rather than an attempt on either end to help individuals unlawfully avoid taxes.
IRS guides
Non-IRS guides
submitted by Mrme487 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: CryptoTechnology top posts from 2017-12-23 to 2020-01-20 15:51 PDT

Period: 758.36 days
Submissions Comments
Total 956 13660
Rate (per day) 1.26 18.01
Unique Redditors 584 3144
Combined Score 21553 44566

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 1166 points, 43 submissions: Neophyte-
    1. "Do you need a Blockchain?" - this paper is fantastic, everyone should read this before evaluating a coin and if requires a block chain to solve a solution the coin is promising to solve. (136 points, 41 comments)
    2. Do any of you foresee a crypto being widely adopted as a general purpose payment coin? nano, btc, btccash etc (take your pick). I think it won't happen for reasons in this post. What do you think? (59 points, 54 comments)
    3. Noticed the huge rise of EOS lately what does it have over NEO and ethereum and to a lesser extent Cardano? I tried researching it, but wasn't sold. (54 points, 55 comments)
    4. Hard Problems in Cryptocurrency: Five Years Later ~Vitalik (46 points, 1 comment)
    5. I had a Q&A with Bruno head architect / CEO of oyster, thought you guys might like it. (45 points, 2 comments)
    6. A good article that explains in simple terms how Eth2 works, how it will be rolled out and migrated from eth1 (42 points, 4 comments)
    7. DAI the stablecoin can now be transferred GAS free (article explaining how it works via new MCD DAI contract). This holds alot of promise for the so called "Web3" (40 points, 8 comments)
    8. Veriblock is consuming 27% of bitcoins block space - what does this mean for bitcoins future? (39 points, 16 comments)
    9. Vitalik: Alternative proposal for early eth1 <-> eth2 merge (38 points, 3 comments)
    10. Is launching a PoW permissionless blockchain still possible today? or would it be too susceptible to a 51% attack? (37 points, 37 comments)
  2. 578 points, 16 submissions: crypto_ha
    1. Why is Ripple considered a cryptocurrency (by many)? (109 points, 63 comments)
    2. So reportedly there are serious vulnerabilities found in EOS’ code. And it seems like those are more than just random software bugs. (97 points, 29 comments)
    3. Guide: How to get started with Blockchain development? (60 points, 6 comments)
    4. A newly found vulnerability in Nano's Android wallet (44 points, 12 comments)
    5. The history and state of Ethereum's Casper research - Vitalik Buterin (39 points, 4 comments)
    6. What is the difference between Sidechain vs Child Chain vs Off Chain? (39 points, 12 comments)
    7. EOS mainnet is official live (finally), but... (36 points, 24 comments)
    8. Bitcoin's "doomsday" economics - Bank of International Settlements (34 points, 23 comments)
    9. How Wall Street’s embrace could undermine Bitcoin (30 points, 9 comments)
    10. Ethereum ERC 1497: DApp Dispute Evidence Standard (24 points, 0 comments)
  3. 513 points, 20 submissions: ndha1995
    1. Ethereum Classic is currently being 51% attacked (103 points, 31 comments)
    2. Why are there so many garbage posts the past 24 hours? (58 points, 10 comments)
    3. Google Unveils 72-Qubit Quantum Processor With Low Error Rates (48 points, 24 comments)
    4. IOTA's Network-Bound PoW consensus, is it feasible? (42 points, 13 comments)
    5. The Challenges of Investigating Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain Related Crime (29 points, 7 comments)
    6. Deep dive into zk-STARKs with Vitalik Buterin's blog posts (26 points, 3 comments)
    7. Tether discussion thread (26 points, 21 comments)
    8. Vitalik Buterin Proposes a Consensus Algorithm That Requires Only 1% to Be Honest (24 points, 8 comments)
    9. Can somebody compare Qtum vs. NEO, technology-wise? (E.g. PoS vs. PoW; smart contract protocols...) (21 points, 15 comments)
    10. Introduction to Non Fungible Tokens (NFTs) (21 points, 9 comments)
  4. 377 points, 16 submissions: turtleflax
    1. Around 13% of DASH's privateSends are traceable to their origin (69 points, 3 comments)
    2. "Big Bang" attack could leverage Monero's dynamic blocksize to bloat the blockchain to 30TB in only 36 hours (52 points, 3 comments)
    3. The case for the obsolescence of Proof of Work and why 2018 will be the year of Proof of Stake (41 points, 29 comments)
    4. Monero vs PIVX: The First Scheduled Privacy Coin Debate Thread on /CryptoCurrency (38 points, 12 comments)
    5. Introducing the Privacy Coin Matrix, a cross-team collaboration comparing 20 privacy coins in 100 categories (26 points, 25 comments)
    6. Do permissioned blockchains have any merits? (25 points, 23 comments)
    7. The State of Hashing Algorithms — The Why, The How, and The Future (21 points, 4 comments)
    8. How Zerocoin Works in 5 Minutes (19 points, 5 comments)
    9. Errors made by Satoshi (17 points, 8 comments)
    10. How Much Privacy is Enough? Threats, Scaling, and Trade-offs in Blockchain Privacy Protocols - Ian Miers (Cornell Tech, Zerocoin, Zerocash) (17 points, 4 comments)
  5. 321 points, 6 submissions: Qwahzi
    1. Technical comparison of LIGHTNING vs TANGLE vs HASHGRAPH vs NANO (133 points, 37 comments)
    2. Addressing Nano's weaknesses (bandwidth usage and disk IO). Nano voting traffic to be reduced by 99.9% by implementing vote by hash, lazy bootstrapping, and reduced vote rebroadcasting (x-post CryptoCurrency) (78 points, 8 comments)
    3. Emergent centralization due to economies of scale (PoW vs DPoS) – Colin LeMahieu (52 points, 37 comments)
    4. Nano community member developing a distributed "mining" service to pay people to do PoW for third-parties (e.g. exchanges, light wallet services, etc) (32 points, 20 comments)
    5. What do you think about OpenCAP, the cryptocurrency alias protocol that mirrors traditional email addresses? (15 points, 12 comments)
    6. Bitcoin would be a calamity, not an economy (11 points, 52 comments)
  6. 256 points, 4 submissions: rockyrainy
    1. Bitcoin Gold hit by Double Spend Attack (51% attack). The Attacker reversed 22 blocks. (179 points, 102 comments)
    2. ZK-starks white paper published (44 points, 16 comments)
    3. [Q] How does a network reach consensus on what time it is? (21 points, 17 comments)
    4. Stateless (no history) Cryptocurrency via snapshots? (12 points, 7 comments)
  7. 244 points, 3 submissions: HSPremier
    1. From a technical standpoint: Why does every blockchain projects need their own coins? (181 points, 50 comments)
    2. What is Reddit's obsession with REQ? (61 points, 43 comments)
    3. What is the technological difference between a privacy coin and a privacy coin platform? Won't a privacy coin platform be more superior than a privacy coin? (2 points, 3 comments)
  8. 234 points, 2 submissions: Realness100
    1. A Guided Reading of Bitcoin’s Original White Paper (202 points, 10 comments)
    2. A Guided Reading of Ethereum's Original White Paper! (32 points, 5 comments)
  9. 185 points, 4 submissions: tracyspacygo
    1. My brief observation of most common Consensus Algorithms (159 points, 49 comments)
    2. What are the main Trends/Challenges for Bitcoin and whole crytpocurrencies industry? (12 points, 33 comments)
    3. Guideline for Newbies: Trying out Bitcoin transactions with TESTNET (7 points, 1 comment)
    4. Most advanced Cryptocurrencies Comparison Table (7 points, 8 comments)
  10. 177 points, 9 submissions: benmdi
    1. What's the best argument against cryptotechnology? I.e. Steelman the cryptocurrency skeptic (43 points, 42 comments)
    2. Would there be interest from this community in crypto resources aimed at developers? If so, what topics? (29 points, 14 comments)
    3. Has the window for bootstrapping a new PoW coin closed? (24 points, 57 comments)
    4. What can we, as a community, learn from the rise & acquisition of GitHub (23 points, 8 comments)
    5. 🍱 Rollup Roundup: Understanding Ethereum's Emerging Layer 2 (19 points, 1 comment)
    6. Video Tutorial: Introducing An Experience Dev To Smart Contract Coding (17 points, 3 comments)
    7. Do we need a blockchain to be decentralized? What questions would you ask a self described fan of decentralization, but blockchain skeptic? (11 points, 19 comments)
    8. ETH Block Rewards And Second Order Effects On Hardware Availability (7 points, 8 comments)
    9. Which Of The Big Tech Companies Is Most Likely To Bring Crypto Mainstream? Here's Why I Think It's Apple (4 points, 7 comments)
  11. 175 points, 9 submissions: galan77
    1. Is the Lightning Network a massive threat to the blockchain? (49 points, 66 comments)
    2. TPS of Lightning Network vs. Sharding, which one does better? (28 points, 7 comments)
    3. Are there any major downsides to sharding? (21 points, 33 comments)
    4. What's the difference between trustlessness and permissionlessness (19 points, 7 comments)
    5. Which consensus algorithm is the best, PoW, PoS, PoAuthority, PoAsset? (18 points, 57 comments)
    6. How can XRP reach 50,000 TPS when they have no sharding and every node has to validate every single transaction. (15 points, 14 comments)
    7. A few questions about the Lightning Network (14 points, 6 comments)
    8. Pascalcoin can do 72,000 tps apparently. Is this legit? The new Nano? (8 points, 39 comments)
    9. How does Ripple's (XRB's) consensus algorithm Proof of Correctness work, are there any downsides? (3 points, 23 comments)
  12. 175 points, 1 submission: ilielezi
    1. Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional? (175 points, 88 comments)
  13. 165 points, 6 submissions: CryptoMaximalist
    1. Facebook's Libra (48 points, 55 comments)
    2. “Fake Stake” attacks on some Proof-of-Stake cryptocurrencies responsibly disclosed by researchers from the Decentralized Systems Lab at UIUC (31 points, 9 comments)
    3. Quantum Computing and the Cryptography in Crypto (27 points, 14 comments)
    4. PING and REJECT attacks on ZCash (Patch available) | Stanford Applied Crypto Group (22 points, 1 comment)
    5. Introduction to Cryptography: Part 1 - Jinglan Wang (19 points, 1 comment)
    6. New site howmanyconfs.com shows the amount of time and confirmations of Proof of Work coins to match 6 confirmations on Bitcoin (18 points, 11 comments)
  14. 163 points, 10 submissions: GainsLean
    1. Videos For Developers Who Want To Learn Blockchain In A Practical Way (36 points, 17 comments)
    2. What Do You Want To Learn? (32 points, 20 comments)
    3. Get Involved With The Smart Contract Coding Challenge (25 points, 4 comments)
    4. Solution To $10K Art Prize (25 points, 3 comments)
    5. Blockchain Course Outline Has Been Released - Feedback warranted (22 points, 12 comments)
    6. Introduction To Distributed Systems And Consensus Protocols (9 points, 2 comments)
    7. Are there any closed source crypto wallets? (4 points, 19 comments)
    8. Are there any successful proof of identity projects? (4 points, 8 comments)
    9. SPV Wallets Vs API Wallets (4 points, 1 comment)
    10. 12 Popular Consensus Algorithms - Explained (2 points, 0 comments)
  15. 163 points, 7 submissions: QRCollector
    1. Part 5. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fifth part of the series talking about an advanced vulnerability of BTC. (43 points, 43 comments)
    2. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the third part of the series introducing Quantum resistant blockchains. (36 points, 4 comments)
    3. Part 4B. I’m writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fourth part of the series explaining the special quality of going quantum resistant from genesis block. (25 points, 21 comments)
    4. Part 6. (Last part) I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. Failing shortcuts in an attempt to accomplish Quantum Resistance (24 points, 38 comments)
    5. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the first part of the series introducing the basic concept of blockchain and what makes it reliable. (23 points, 10 comments)
    6. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fourth part of the series explaining the special quality of going quantum resistant from genesis block. (7 points, 1 comment)
    7. Part 2. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the second part of the series: An accessible description of hashing and signature schemes. (5 points, 0 comments)
  16. 162 points, 3 submissions: FashionistaGuru
    1. How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency? (118 points, 54 comments)
    2. Which cryptos have the best new user experience? (30 points, 34 comments)
    3. Why does Apple prevent many crypto apps from entering the App Store? (14 points, 8 comments)
  17. 157 points, 7 submissions: SamsungGalaxyPlayer
    1. Breaking Monero Episodes 1-3: Introduction, Ring Signatures, 0-Decoy and Chain Reactions (45 points, 1 comment)
    2. "No, dPoW Isn't a Perfect Solution" (35 points, 48 comments)
    3. Breaking Mimblewimble’s Privacy Model - Dragonfly Research (27 points, 10 comments)
    4. Breaking Monero (and Zcash) Episodes 7-9: Remote Nodes, Timing Attacks, Poisoned Outputs (EAE Attack) (21 points, 2 comments)
    5. "Attacker Collection of IP Metadata" (18 points, 10 comments)
    6. "Tracing Transactions Across Cryptocurrency Ledgers" Using Shapeshift and Changelly (6 points, 4 comments)
    7. Breaking Monero Episodes 4-6: Chain Splits (Key Image Attack), Input Selection Algorithm, Unusual Ringsize (5 points, 2 comments)
  18. 147 points, 1 submission: shunsaitakahashi
    1. Proof-of-Approval: Stake Based, 1 Block Finality & History Attack Defense (147 points, 4 comments)
  19. 146 points, 6 submissions: themoderndayhercules
    1. "The selfish mining fallacy" explained and debunked (60 points, 8 comments)
    2. A Discussion of Stable coins and Decentralized Oracles (35 points, 8 comments)
    3. A Selfish Mining Double Spending attack Simulator (25 points, 2 comments)
    4. Why reputation systems don't work (15 points, 12 comments)
    5. A better incentivization for Swarm (6 points, 0 comments)
    6. When Mises met Szabo - A Discussion of the value of Bitcoin (5 points, 16 comments)
  20. 143 points, 7 submissions: KomodoWorld
    1. Komodo Platform's core developer and founder jl777 has started his own blog on Medium. The blog is aimed for senior developers who want to learn about blockchain. (46 points, 15 comments)
    2. Delayed Proof of Work (dPoW) security explained (36 points, 46 comments)
    3. Proof-of-Gameplay (19 points, 3 comments)
    4. Good guide for getting started with the Custom Consensus tech for Komodo-based blockchains (17 points, 0 comments)
    5. Cross-chain migration of coins with Crypto Conditions - by smk762 (12 points, 0 comments)
    6. A step-by-step example of working with a Crypto Conditions based Oracle - by smk762 (10 points, 0 comments)
    7. Changing consensus rules on the fly with Crypto Conditions (3 points, 0 comments)
  21. 141 points, 8 submissions: Stormy1997
    1. What technical/business advantages does a private blockchain have over a SQL server? (49 points, 79 comments)
    2. Is sharding to scale bad? (24 points, 28 comments)
    3. How would one create a fiat gateway theoretically? (19 points, 19 comments)
    4. Looking for Stellar smart contract/side chain code examples (16 points, 1 comment)
    5. Question - Securing personal information on a centralized server with user-owned keys (13 points, 3 comments)
    6. How do blockchains/smart contracts communicate with oracles? (10 points, 4 comments)
    7. Bandwidth scaling for TPS (8 points, 2 comments)
    8. Best method to transmit detailed data between two parties via existing platforms (2 points, 1 comment)
  22. 141 points, 3 submissions: seventyfiver
    1. Why does Ethereum use Solidity while other ecosystems like NEO stick with popular ones like Java and C#? (94 points, 26 comments)
    2. Chainlink's initial Go implementation went live this morning. Has anyone reviewed the code and can comment on it's quality? (40 points, 3 comments)
    3. What are some great books on cryptoeconomics or blockchain technology? (7 points, 4 comments)
  23. 134 points, 6 submissions: johnny_milkshakes
    1. Sub dedicated to DAG based coins (42 points, 8 comments)
    2. Thoughts on this? (28 points, 38 comments)
    3. This is very interesting (24 points, 19 comments)
    4. Educational presentation by Clara Shikhelman (18 points, 0 comments)
    5. Ethics question. (12 points, 40 comments)
    6. How to scale on chain? (10 points, 30 comments)
  24. 127 points, 4 submissions: sukitrebek
    1. What are you currently obsessed with, and why? (58 points, 150 comments)
    2. Crypto-based social network without a cryptocurrency. (42 points, 23 comments)
    3. How does underlying architecture affect what kinds of applications are possible? (17 points, 3 comments)
    4. Holochain vs. Radix DLT (10 points, 11 comments)
  25. 126 points, 1 submission: RufusTheFirefly
    1. Everytime I try to investigate the technology behind Cardano(Ada), I come across the words "scientific" and "peer-reviewed" over and over but almost no actual details. Can someone fill how this coin actually works and where they are in development? (126 points, 49 comments)
  26. 112 points, 1 submission: rocksolid77
    1. Can we have a real debate about the Bitcoin scaling issue? (112 points, 89 comments)
  27. 110 points, 4 submissions: kelluk
    1. What one can learn from browsing 30 million Ethereum addresses (72 points, 21 comments)
    2. I wanted to categorize all coins/tokens, and this is my proposal (23 points, 33 comments)
    3. Should whitepapers be understood by ordinary people? (10 points, 41 comments)
    4. Querying the Ethereum blockchain: how to & what to? (5 points, 5 comments)
  28. 107 points, 1 submission: NewDietTrend
    1. Outside of currency and voting, blockchain is awful and shouldnt be used. Can anyone explain where blockchain is worth the cost? (107 points, 166 comments)
  29. 105 points, 1 submission: insette
    1. /CryptoTech PSA: there are broadly TWO TYPES of Decentralized Exchanges. Which type are you investing in? (105 points, 55 comments)
  30. 103 points, 3 submissions: dtheme
    1. How to accept crypto payments for digital downloads if you are a small business? Solutions, e-commerce sites are lacking (46 points, 38 comments)
    2. How many 24 letter seeds and "Bitcoin" keys can there be? (34 points, 24 comments)
    3. Is there any reason why the big tech companies are not getting into crypto? (23 points, 36 comments)
  31. 103 points, 3 submissions: dvnielng
    1. Why do so many of these businesses need a token? (Unsure) (61 points, 86 comments)
    2. DAPPS - Only coins that have intrinsic value? Ethereum , Neo? (31 points, 10 comments)
    3. How could blockchain work for expensive purchases/escrow? (11 points, 2 comments)
  32. 101 points, 1 submission: kickso
    1. Is NANO everything it says it is? (101 points, 96 comments)
  33. 98 points, 3 submissions: heart_mind_body
    1. How can we breathe some life into this sub? (56 points, 22 comments)
    2. Can anyone give an example for a technology that provides a "public permissioned blockchain"? (28 points, 16 comments)
    3. Can we do a discussion on ICON and "clusters of private chains connected to a public chain" ? (14 points, 13 comments)
  34. 97 points, 8 submissions: kelraku
    1. Thoughts on Mimblewimble? (23 points, 13 comments)
    2. Has anyone looked at the lelantus protocol? (18 points, 6 comments)
    3. How much control do developers have over the coins (18 points, 6 comments)
    4. Lesser known protocols? (11 points, 17 comments)
    5. Zerocoin and Blockchain Analysis (9 points, 5 comments)
    6. Zerocoin vs Cryptonote (7 points, 14 comments)
    7. Lightning network privacy (6 points, 13 comments)
    8. Integrity of the DAG (5 points, 17 comments)
  35. 96 points, 6 submissions: blockstasy
    1. How to Get to One Million Devs (32 points, 12 comments)
    2. The Decade in Blockchain — 2010 to 2020 in Review (27 points, 4 comments)
    3. Ethereum by the Numbers – The Year of 2019 (26 points, 9 comments)
    4. Knowledge Drop: Mining and the role it plays with the Ethereum blockchain (5 points, 0 comments)
    5. A great article that explains Ethereum’s Muir Glacier Update (4 points, 0 comments)
    6. Youtube Silences Crypto Community (2 points, 6 comments)
  36. 93 points, 3 submissions: OneOverNever
    1. Which is the last WHITE PAPER you've read that's truly impacted you? (77 points, 81 comments)
    2. [CMV] Bitcoin's intrinsic technological value. (14 points, 29 comments)
    3. What are some weak points that still hold XVG back from becoming a top player in crypto? (Technically speaking, not marketing and etc.) (2 points, 19 comments)
  37. 93 points, 3 submissions: ryano-ark
    1. (ARK) ACES Completes Integration of ARK Channels for Two-way Transfers for Easy ICOs When Paired With ARK Deployer (Push-Button-Blockchains) (57 points, 5 comments)
    2. (ARK) ACES Releases Fast (Ansible) Deployments for all ACES Applications. (23 points, 4 comments)
    3. A Future of Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains (13 points, 3 comments)
  38. 92 points, 2 submissions: BobUltra
    1. Our blockchains are all centralized! (51 points, 34 comments)
    2. List of qualities needed to dethrone Bitcoin. (41 points, 43 comments)
  39. 90 points, 1 submission: refreshx2
    1. CMV: It doesn't make sense for (crypto)companies to create coins linked to their tech (90 points, 18 comments)
  40. 89 points, 1 submission: perceptron01
    1. What does Nano do better than Steem? (89 points, 55 comments)
  41. 87 points, 1 submission: Shuk
    1. How does one begin to develop an employable skill in blockchain development? (87 points, 25 comments)
  42. 87 points, 1 submission: conorohiggins
    1. I spent three weeks researching and writing a huge guide to stablecoins. Enjoy! (87 points, 36 comments)
  43. 86 points, 1 submission: Bacon_Hero
    1. ELI5: Why did it take so long for blockchain technology to be created? (86 points, 66 comments)
  44. 85 points, 3 submissions: theFoot58
    1. If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we? (65 points, 53 comments)
    2. If the Internet had its Genesis Block, what would it be? (14 points, 9 comments)
    3. Coin grouping - ruby and CryptoCompare API (6 points, 1 comment)
  45. 85 points, 1 submission: youngm2
    1. Which decentralised exchange has the most promise for 2018? (85 points, 89 comments)
  46. 84 points, 4 submissions: bLbGoldeN
    1. On Mass Adoption of Cryptocurrencies (28 points, 68 comments)
    2. Join the Bloom team for our first tech AMA tomorrow (Tuesday, March 13th) at 7 PM GMT! (23 points, 2 comments)
    3. Join the Decred team for an AMA - Friday, June 1st from 19:00 to 22:00 UTC (17 points, 10 comments)
    4. Join the district0x team for an AMA Monday, April 2nd at 5:00 PM (GMT) (16 points, 0 comments)
  47. 82 points, 2 submissions: SubsequentDownfall
    1. Has a 51% attack ever been witnessed? (45 points, 46 comments)
    2. Is a DAG coin like RaiBlocks able to be private like Monero? (37 points, 40 comments)
  48. 82 points, 2 submissions: guidre
    1. Tron and other source Code (42 points, 24 comments)
    2. Why Will companies adopt blockchain, the user interface is complex and i'm not sure that many companies want all their internal dealings made public. (40 points, 19 comments)
  49. 81 points, 4 submissions: solar128
    1. New Atomic Swap Tools Released (35 points, 4 comments)
    2. Using Blockchain to make a censorship-resistant Reddit (28 points, 14 comments)
    3. Best security practices for addressing Spectre & Meltdown (13 points, 0 comments)
    4. Influence of on-chain governance weighted by wealth - good or bad? (5 points, 2 comments)
  50. 81 points, 2 submissions: Blockchainsapiens
    1. Blockchain study finds 0.00% success rate and vendors don't call back when asked for evidence (47 points, 30 comments)
    2. The elephant in the room: would the public ever use a volatile currency over a stable currency? (34 points, 45 comments)
  51. 81 points, 1 submission: Mycryptopedia
    1. Understanding the Tech Behind RaiBlocks (81 points, 7 comments)
  52. 81 points, 1 submission: davidvanbeveren
    1. Article thoroughly analysing / comparing IOTA and RaiBlocks (x-post /CryptoCurrency) (81 points, 10 comments)
  53. 77 points, 4 submissions: DeleteMyOldAccount
    1. HD Wallets Explained: What they are, and how to make them coin agnostic (28 points, 11 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Cash May 15th fork (23 points, 22 comments)
    3. So you want to build a Bitcoin HD wallet? Part 1 (23 points, 3 comments)
    4. Applications of Blockchain in Supply Chain (3 points, 9 comments)
  54. 76 points, 3 submissions: kryptofinger
    1. Why would anyone bother using any DPOS coins for dapps like Eos over normal systems like AWS? (44 points, 104 comments)
    2. Could a state backed privacy coin work? (22 points, 32 comments)
    3. Thoughts on Elastos? (10 points, 8 comments)
  55. 76 points, 1 submission: francohab
    1. 55% of the Nano representative nodes are "official representatives", presumably held by developers. How big of an issue is that? (76 points, 46 comments)
  56. 75 points, 2 submissions: MerkleChainsaw
    1. The biggest challenge for cryptocurrencies and how to mitigate it (73 points, 37 comments)
    2. Short and long term design tradeoffs in crypto (2 points, 2 comments)
  57. 75 points, 1 submission: jatsignwork
    1. Raiblocks & Spam (75 points, 60 comments)
  58. 74 points, 1 submission: behindtext
    1. Hello, this is Jake Yocom-Piatt. Ask me anything about Decred! (74 points, 49 comments)
  59. 73 points, 2 submissions: TexasRadical83
    1. Why use a new "currency" at all? (40 points, 48 comments)
    2. Why are big price increases for crypto a good thing? (33 points, 41 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Neophyte- (1649 points, 746 comments)
  2. ndha1995 (583 points, 98 comments)
  3. turtleflax (406 points, 116 comments)
  4. senzheng (326 points, 193 comments)
  5. holomntn (294 points, 40 comments)
  6. manly_ (286 points, 43 comments)
  7. signos_de_admiracion (250 points, 18 comments)
  8. fgiveme (231 points, 77 comments)
  9. crypto_kang (222 points, 45 comments)
  10. jatsignwork (220 points, 37 comments)
  11. GainsLean (218 points, 76 comments)
  12. benthecarman (211 points, 48 comments)
  13. rockyrainy (200 points, 39 comments)
  14. hungryforitalianfood (197 points, 58 comments)
  15. rocksolid77 (190 points, 20 comments)
  16. bannercoin (189 points, 11 comments)
  17. insette (181 points, 47 comments)
  18. DiogenicOrder (175 points, 41 comments)
  19. islanavarino (173 points, 51 comments)
  20. behindtext (172 points, 14 comments)
  21. takitus (171 points, 25 comments)
  22. sukitrebek (170 points, 42 comments)
  23. UnknownEssence (170 points, 31 comments)
  24. crypto_ha (170 points, 26 comments)
  25. AlexCoventry (167 points, 17 comments)
  26. DragonWhsiperer (165 points, 38 comments)
  27. stop-making-accounts (164 points, 57 comments)
  28. KnifeOfPi2 (157 points, 13 comments)
  29. Edgegasm (156 points, 42 comments)
  30. ippond (152 points, 15 comments)
  31. dontlikecomputers (151 points, 61 comments)
  32. QRCollector (150 points, 46 comments)
  33. alexrecuenco (145 points, 18 comments)
  34. BobUltra (144 points, 88 comments)
  35. SpamCamel (135 points, 22 comments)
  36. InterdisciplinaryHum (133 points, 107 comments)
  37. theglitteringone (132 points, 10 comments)
  38. ChocolateSunrise (128 points, 23 comments)
  39. PM_ME_UR_QUINES (125 points, 4 comments)
  40. narwhale111 (122 points, 15 comments)
  41. pepe_le_shoe (121 points, 47 comments)
  42. Darius510 (119 points, 39 comments)
  43. glen-hodl (118 points, 21 comments)
  44. HOG_ZADDY (117 points, 23 comments)
  45. coranos2 (116 points, 44 comments)
  46. etherenvoy (116 points, 15 comments)
  47. johnny_milkshakes (115 points, 55 comments)
  48. galan77 (115 points, 52 comments)
  49. hybridsole (113 points, 40 comments)
  50. funciton (113 points, 8 comments)
  51. Mr0ldy (110 points, 24 comments)
  52. Corm (109 points, 42 comments)
  53. cryptoscopia (109 points, 7 comments)
  54. ReportFromHell (106 points, 39 comments)
  55. broscientologist (105 points, 26 comments)
  56. straytjacquet (104 points, 28 comments)
  57. Quadling (101 points, 24 comments)
  58. BlockEnthusiast (101 points, 17 comments)
  59. thats_not_montana (99 points, 37 comments)
  60. TheRealMotherOfOP (98 points, 27 comments)
  61. yarauuta (96 points, 11 comments)
  62. pegasuspect93 (96 points, 1 comment)
  63. andrew_bao (93 points, 40 comments)
  64. samdotla (93 points, 6 comments)
  65. melodious_punk (91 points, 34 comments)
  66. Mquantum (91 points, 31 comments)
  67. TJ_Hooker15 (91 points, 27 comments)
  68. NoFaptain99 (91 points, 3 comments)
  69. ilielezi (87 points, 10 comments)
  70. Raapop (87 points, 2 comments)
  71. Allways_Wrong (86 points, 36 comments)
  72. bLbGoldeN (86 points, 19 comments)
  73. ResIpsaLoquiturrr (86 points, 15 comments)
  74. kabelman93 (85 points, 29 comments)
  75. no_pants_gamer (84 points, 9 comments)
  76. AnkurTechracers (83 points, 16 comments)
  77. ric2b (83 points, 11 comments)
  78. Big_Goose (83 points, 10 comments)
  79. Lifeistooshor1 (82 points, 21 comments)
  80. vornth (82 points, 11 comments)
  81. Sargos (81 points, 25 comments)
  82. refreshx2 (81 points, 16 comments)
  83. Qwahzi (78 points, 27 comments)
  84. StupidRandomGuy (77 points, 35 comments)
  85. WikiTextBot (77 points, 24 comments)
  86. SnootyEuropean (77 points, 5 comments)
  87. cryptogainz (76 points, 14 comments)
  88. frequentlywrong (76 points, 4 comments)
  89. the_defiant (76 points, 4 comments)
  90. BrangdonJ (75 points, 28 comments)
  91. hendrik_v (75 points, 7 comments)
  92. solar128 (74 points, 18 comments)
  93. foobazzler (74 points, 8 comments)
  94. ginger_beer_m (73 points, 35 comments)
  95. kAhmij (73 points, 25 comments)
  96. DeleteMyOldAccount (73 points, 20 comments)
  97. sn0wr4in (73 points, 9 comments)
  98. Dyslectic_Sabreur (72 points, 5 comments)
  99. X7spyWqcRY (71 points, 8 comments)
  100. Krapser (70 points, 5 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. A Guided Reading of Bitcoin’s Original White Paper by Realness100 (202 points, 10 comments)
  2. From a technical standpoint: Why does every blockchain projects need their own coins? by HSPremier (181 points, 50 comments)
  3. Bitcoin Gold hit by Double Spend Attack (51% attack). The Attacker reversed 22 blocks. by rockyrainy (179 points, 102 comments)
  4. Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional? by ilielezi (175 points, 88 comments)
  5. My brief observation of most common Consensus Algorithms by tracyspacygo (159 points, 49 comments)
  6. Proof-of-Approval: Stake Based, 1 Block Finality & History Attack Defense by shunsaitakahashi (147 points, 4 comments)
  7. "Do you need a Blockchain?" - this paper is fantastic, everyone should read this before evaluating a coin and if requires a block chain to solve a solution the coin is promising to solve. by Neophyte- (136 points, 41 comments)
  8. Technical comparison of LIGHTNING vs TANGLE vs HASHGRAPH vs NANO by Qwahzi (133 points, 37 comments)
  9. Everytime I try to investigate the technology behind Cardano(Ada), I come across the words "scientific" and "peer-reviewed" over and over but almost no actual details. Can someone fill how this coin actually works and where they are in development? by RufusTheFirefly (126 points, 49 comments)
  10. How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency? by FashionistaGuru (118 points, 54 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 160 points: holomntn's comment in ELI5: Why did it take so long for blockchain technology to be created?
  2. 121 points: KnifeOfPi2's comment in How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency?
  3. 105 points: theglitteringone's comment in Outside of currency and voting, blockchain is awful and shouldnt be used. Can anyone explain where blockchain is worth the cost?
  4. 102 points: benthecarman's comment in If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we?
  5. 96 points: pegasuspect93's comment in If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we?
  6. 95 points: bannercoin's comment in Realistically, why would anybody expect the startup crypto platforms to beat out the corporate giants who are developing their own Blockchain as a Service (BaaS) solutions? Ex. IBM, SAP, JP Morgan...
  7. 83 points: AlexCoventry's comment in Ethereum private key with all zeroes leads to an account with 5000$ on it
  8. 82 points: deleted's comment in Is blockchain really useful ?
  9. 81 points: signos_de_admiracion's comment in Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional?
  10. 78 points: NoFaptain99's comment in Why do so many of these businesses need a token? (Unsure)
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Constantinople Hard Fork Discussion

Constantinople is planned upcoming hard fork of Ethereum main net, believed to roll out Q4 this year, although no timeline has officially been given.

Majority of EIPs planned to be included in Constantinople have strong support among devs and community, however there are three contentious propositions that need to be discussed. Those are: 1) Difficulty Bomb delay, 2) Ether issuance reduction, and 3) ASIC resistance.
As with every problem there are many points of view and issues, but for quick gist of it here is short summary: Difficulty Bomb will soon take effect, gradually prolonging block time until Ethereum will virtually come to a halt. To secure block time of 15 s, delaying Difficulty Bomb is proposed, as has already been done in Byzantium hard fork. However delaying Difficulty Bomb would greatly affect Ether issuance. Therefore block mining reward reduction has been proposed (from 3 to 2, 1 or 0.5 Ether). But issuance reduction decreases mining profitability, cutting out smaller miners and favoring ASIC, resulting in centralization and lesser network security. To mitigate this issue ASIC resistance has been proposed to eliminate mining cartels.

Here is list of previous discussions around mentioned issues:

1) Difficulty Bomb:
2) Issuance reduction:
3) ASIC resistance

What to do?

Voice your opinion! Read, research and participate in discussion! Devs are in final stages of selecting EIPs for Constantinople hard fork. Next Devs Call is on 24th of August.

Full disclosure

I am strongly against eliminating Difficulty Bomb, however I am in favor of delaying it to no later than 30th July 2019. I also think Ethereum is overpaying network security, therefore I support block reward reduction to 1 ETH coupled with implementation of ASIC resistance. If ASIC resistance is rejected, I would like to see community discuss block reward reduction to 1.5 or 2 ETH with block time of 30s.
submitted by svarov to ethereum [link] [comments]

[Discord Conversation] For the last 2-3 weeks.

The dates are not so accurate here and there. There could be a little bit editing, but mostly, original conversation.

For a transparency and a big support to IF!

7/10
microhash - 06/28/2018 Thanks for the advice, guys. Already told eric that I'm interested, now it's up to the IF.
dom - Today at 3:04 AM no, we do not work with Bosch on Jinn
Fahad Sheikh - Today at 3:14 AM There is a lot to look forward to, didn't ya'll see the Project List that Edward posted in Medium? Coordicide being the most interesting one IMO.
Come-from-Beyond - Today at 6:34 AM [bro which company will manufacture the jinn processors] Nvidia, joke :trollcfb:
Eric Hop - Today at 5:10 AM If you are thinking there isn't much response from IF on Discord at the moment: we're all together at a summit working closely together. We're doing team building (we're from all over the globe) and work shops. Cross team presentations. And working in research groups to boost most projects forward.
7/20
David Sønstebø - Today at 1:27 AM The lightweight trinary hashfunction that IOTA set out to create with the Curl-P project will indeed be created by world leading cryptographers who specialize in exactly this field within cryptography. and yes, this has begun.
7/27
Ralf RottmannLast Monday at 5:53 PM 1.) IOTA Foundation has been very clear about the importance of manual tethering and that understanding deployment topologies will be an ongoing research topic. IOTA Foundation has also made clear, that better support for finding neighbours is a topic under active research. As the current status clearly shows, the solution is not as simple as what Nelson brings to the table. So in essence, Nelson forces IOTA Foundation to shift priorities. These things happen all the time and we are not that worried about it. We knew this ride wouldn't be easy!
2.) In an open source, permissionless environment, Roman and his team do not have to ask for permission and do not have to cooperate with anybody. They can do whatever they think might be valuable for the community, the network and its many different stakeholders. It will always be up to the users and various parties who are having an interest into the technology, to decide whether they see value being added or damage done. There is no objective judge empowered to decide. On the contrary, everyone is entitled to freely voice praise, concerns and opinion at any time.
3.) It already is public knowledge, that IOTA Foundation has been discussing ways to actively collaborate with Roman and his team a while ago but we couldn't agree around technicalities and commercials and ultimately mutually decided, that it would help the community at large, if Roman and his team stay completely independent and IOTA Foundation continues its research and development, with network topology just being a tiny part of the grand vision.
4.) Roman has publicly stated, that he is not interested in forking the project and only wants to do good for IOTA. I personally appreciate him being very clear about this, because it takes away uncertainty and speculation and I trust Roman to be genuinely honest with us. It does, however, come with the territory, that forks might happen at any time. I personally do not worry that much, should we ever see an attempt from anybody to embark on a fork. My decision to follow such an undertaking (with time, effort and money), would always be based on the likelihood of the effort to having enough funds to exist long-term. IOTA is not just about a network of nodes. Bringing the complete vision to life is an enormous effort, that will take years to come, the commitment of large corporate and public partners and affording a strong global team, to holding the pieces together. I have seen many similar initiatives failing. So far, IOTA Foundation has done very well and I'm confident we're just getting started. I hope this somewhat sets the record straight for what I've been stating on Twitter and elsewhere!
dom Last Monday at 4:01 AM sidetangles are something that we are actively researching right now with a university. Quite frankly, at the current stage, they serve little purpose on the mainnet for any of our use cases or products we intend to build.
dom Last Monday at 4:02 AM I'm not sure if they will be disabled by this fix entirely - I don't think so. But I will let our engineers answer that.
iota yodler Yesterday at 11:35 PM is the Finish line in sight?!
dom Yesterday at 11:36 PM [about recalim status] 85%
David Sønstebø 07/20/2018 [Any news about IOTA and the e-krona in the past weeks? ] Nothing to report right now, in Scandinavia it is summer vacation
David Sønstebø Last Wednesday at 4:43 AM [any information about work with partners, like VW, Cisco, Schindler.... etc] @DvorNick When it comes to updates with organizations we work with, it is equally in their hands. It's unfortunately an incredibly tedious process, the people we work with are excited to get news out, but they have to jump through 10 hoops to get it approved
David Sønstebø Last Wednesday at 4:52 AM 1) If the community had to choose, what do you want: founders and Foundation members that can communicate in a friendly, transparent and open fashion, including the candid joking chats or shadows in ivory towers with personality cults?
2) I refuse to believe CfB has ever said: "I guarantee the price will be X"
Our vision, our status updates etc. are 100% honest. That's what you need to focus on. We don't cater to speculators, we just put the truth out there, then you can interpret and speculate as you want
Come-from-Beyond Last Wednesday at 4:55 AM I just said that IOTA will be #1 on CMC
Come-from-Beyond Last Wednesday at 4:55 AM roughly 5 months left
David Sønstebø Last Wednesday at 4:58 AM @Ryan G. 100%. 6 degrees of separation is no joke. For IF right now it's more about quality over quantity, we got way more demand than we can supply, but there's certainly a few things that will come to mind
David Sønstebø Last Wednesday at 5:08 AM [You have selected great advisors for IF, well done! question: how do you work with them in the organisation?] @ets Thanks. It differs from person to person, some we are working with on a nearly daily basis, others we speak with once a week about the bigger picture, or more actively within a certain project
Ralf Rottmann Last Monday at 5:07 PM @Th3B0Y We are actively engaging with Eclipse Foundation. They have governance figured out for large projects like ours.
Ralf Rottmann Last Monday at 5:15 PM [will IF always decide, for example, what changes and what doesn't on IRI?] @Th3B0Y No. That's exactly what Eclipse Foundation will bring to the table. It has clearly outlined and well established processes around these things and will help us to bring in large contributors (like corporate partners) down to individuals. We are already engaging with key partners who are keen to help contributing to our code base. Moving under Eclipse Foundation involves some complex legal matters around trademarks, which is why we are not "just doing it" right away.
Ralf Rottmann Last Monday at 5:22 PM [ if the IF doesn't want something to change/be added but many devs want, will it be "merged" anyway? or will they simply have to fork it?] @Th3B0Y There will be a process around it with IOTA Foundation not having sort of the ultimate power. That was never our intention. It's just required at the early stage we're at. –– Of course, everybody can decide to fork at any time and everyone can decide to go with a fork. I personally would make such a decision primarily based on the likelihood of any fork to having enough funds for supporting an undertaking as big as the IOTA vision. We have to keep it mind, it's not just about setting up a basic network! (Something we tend to forget.)
7/30
Ralf Rottmann Last Tuesday at 12:11 AM Sergey Ivancheglo is a honorary member & founder. He is not legally employed by IOTA Foundation, as many others. CfB developed the first version of COO. IOTA Foundation runs and operates COO instances and has full access to the source code.
Edward Greve Last Tuesday at 12:58 AM [CFB is creating a significant portion of Tangles technology] @Deep_Sea_Hopper Not since 2016
Edward Greve Last Tuesday at 12:58 AM CFB hasn't contributed to IRI (or any other IF maintained repo) to my knowledge since then
Edward Greve Last Tuesday at 1:02 AM Ict, at the moment, is being worked on by CFB alone. We (IF) have seen the code, but are not working on it until he's "done" with it and then gives it to us to fix / polish / improve and release publicly. The same thing happened with IRI ~2 years ago...
Ralf RottmannLast Tuesday at 1:07 AM @Deep_Sea_Hopper For the sake of completeness and because it has been said before: We were considering working with Roman's team but the technicalities and commercials haven't worked out. We are confident, that our very own teams will figure out a solution while at the same time spending our funds in line with our charitable, non-profit boundaries. -- There are some good news in this: We all seem to be completely aligned about the various problem statements. The various parties can now start working on fixes.
Edward GreveLast Tuesday at 1:15 AM He is saying that Ict represents the swarm nodes, and doesn't expect them to work in the current mainnet environment due to his assumption that the Ict nodes and autopeered nodes will form separate clusters, with the vast majority of transactions happening outside of the Ict cluster.
Edward GreveLast Tuesday at 1:21 AM Ideally, we would have a well-researched auto peering solution, which answers all of the open questions. I don't see it happening that quickly though. It's a complex problem.
Ralf RottmannLast Tuesday at 3:31 AM @lluisin I have explained it before: We did take a thorough look at Nelson and decided, that we leverage our engineering team, to address the problem of automatic peering. As a charitable non-profit foundation (sorry for constantly reminding everyone of this), we need to pick carefully, where we spend money. We currently cannot justify to enhance a "product" that we ultimately do not believe in as a solution to a core challenge. As towards collaboration with Roman in a professional capacity, we did discuss this openly with him and his brother but couldn't agree on the technicalities and commercials.
Ralf RottmannLast Tuesday at 3:39 AM Applied to what Roman and his team do, this means we can't invest into Field, which is not yet open source and not developed in the open. Same is true for Hercules. We could potentially invest into Nelson but don't think it's solving the problem the right way. We haven't done an exhaustively deep analysis. We haven't prepared a laundry list of points, that Roman and his team could work upon to make Nelson better. Nelson is not our product. We don't believe in it. Hence we're not "wasting" the Foundation's time and money on improving it. We (have to) live with the consequences it causes and instead ramp up our own efforts to eliminate the root issues. Thanks to the many donors who believe in the project, we have the funds to work on this for years to come and are confident that time and dedication will bring us there.
Ralf RottmannLast Tuesday at 3:46 AM I absolutely understand that humans tend to jump on apparent short term fixes and it's extremely difficult to stay patient. And there is one other aspect: Workarounds like Nelson constantly challenge the network and our basic assumptions. They help surfacing what we don't know. It's not always fun, but it certainly helps driving IOTA forward! So we are eternally grateful for having Roman and every other community developer around. We also believe, there are vast commercial opportunities for the community in IOTA. Spending Foundation money on those just is a totally different story. For the Semko brothers there is absolutely nothing to worry about. There also is no attitude. I think this very open debate is a testament to exactly that. The community has asked for more transparency. We hopefully have established that. Since my very first day in this community, I always said what I mean. You can either ask for my honest opinion or should not ask me. It would have been way easier to respond with some generic paragraph about how much we appreciate every contribution and move on. The fact of the matter is: We are all in this together for a multitude of different reasons. That is what makes IOTA so fascinating. As the only party, who is a regularly audited charitable non-profit, we are legally required to make all of our decisions transparent. Hence we sometimes cannot rush out fixes, release untested software or do quick investment decisions. When the IOTA founders chose a non-profit foundation, they did so for a reason. One thing everyone can be absolutely assured at any time: IOTA Foundation is not in this for any commercial purposes. It has no shareholders. No beneficiaries. No owners. It is owned by itself. That's a major advantage. (And also, why I'm not at all nervous about the potential of any forks. Going with a fork that's not governed as a charitable non-profit would be borderline stupid.)
Ralf RottmannLast Tuesday at 4:07 AM Getting back to Nelson: As Roman stated earlier, we had Mathew Yarger looking into Nelson. We do plan to send our findings and questions to Roman by the end of the week. Out of respect, I would leave it up to Roman whether he wants to share publicly and to which extend he sees value in keeping the community updated about our interaction.
Come-from-BeyondLast Tuesday at 4:53 AM I'm back guys, has anyone reviewed my claim that current Nelson's strategy contradicts to what was recommended in that paper about reaching consensus? (https://www3.nd.edu/~mhaenggi/pubs/jstsp11.pdf)
Ralf RottmannLast Tuesday at 5:04 AM [Okay so the lower rotation frequence creates wormholes? ] @PatriQ That’s actually the entire point. It’s a hard problem to solve. Needs research. Thoroughly reading relevant papers. Rushing out a workaround and hoping it “just works” is not the way the foundation can handle things. And we take the liberty to occasionally highlight this aspect.
Come-from-BeyondLast Tuesday at 5:04 AM [Okay so the lower rotation frequence creates wormholes?] Higher rotation frequency does. Also make sure that you have not more than 3 active neighbors with manual tehtering we use 5-7 assuming that some neighbors will die
PatriQLast Tuesday at 5:06 AM Okay so we figured out couple of points: 1# Higher rotation frequency creates wormholes. 2# Max 5-7 neighbors (thats included with Nelson) What else?
Ralf RottmannLast Tuesday at 5:16 AM @Deep_Sea_Hopper We did an analysis and Roman is in touch with Mat.
Come-from-BeyondLast Tuesday at 5:42 AM @PatriQ 2# Max 5-7 neighbors (thats included with Nelson) 3 neighbors if Nelson is used (assuming those neighbors are active ones)
David SønstebøLast Tuesday at 9:34 AM Today has been an interesting one. Some topics need to be clarified right away: The IOTA Foundation is 100% supportive of any third party actors such as the Semko brothers, the IOTA project is an open and permissionless one; therefore everyone has the right to develop on top of it. In fact, the entire IOTA project is dependent on it. Independent entities, whether big or small, getting involved and developing in conjunction with or independent of the IOTA Foundation is a mantra we have been preaching since the very inception of IOTA. It is the vision we still have for the future of IOTA. As an open source project, this is crucial for success. Another vital aspect is a drastic improvement in communication, bilaterally between IF and third parties, as well as in general to the broader community. We are happy to say that this is the number one priority of the foundation at the moment. We know that people can become confused and begin to speculate, rightfully so, when there is a vacuum in communication. If something is going on with the network that we have not communicated beforehand, then Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt kicks in. What we are working on right now is weekly newsletters, weekly update blog posts on certain days, and a roadmap that is continually up to date, that will give everyone a clear insight into where the different projects are, both from development and research perspectives, as well are defined ETAs. The IOTA community is a smart and driven one, but no one can be expected to predict the future or read our minds; therefore it is incumbent upon the IOTA Foundation to communicate in a fashion that gives people predictable roadmaps and status updates to avoid excessive worrying. Finally, everyone should feel absolutely free to raise their opinions and ask whatever questions they feel like. At the end of the day we are all in this together, and while the work being conducted by IF now is more efficient and focused than ever before, it is ultimately our responsibility that this is reflected in our communication and thus permeates the attitude of the project overall.
Come-from-BeyondLast Friday at 3:36 PM [Is it attacker led or just a bad fix in 1.5.2?] 1.5.2 is a first half of the fix, next version will deploy the other half Let's do totalizator, like horse-racing but in our case one with highest confirmation ratio will win?
Come-from-BeyondLast Friday at 5:19 PM [when fix to the IRI?] Dunno, IF doesn't rush to release a fix, its goal not only to make users happy but also to analyze attacks and counterattacks
7/30
domYesterday at 5:27 PM network protocol and syncing is something we are looking deeper right now. But the network layer is the number one bottleneck of IOTA right now.
domYesterday at 5:50 PM waiting on the Desktop release, then we will work on the Ledger integration. but the community already did a fantastic job there
domYesterday at 5:51 PM yeh, Trinity Desktop will be amazing I really want to see an IOTA App Marketplace evolve around that, where people can then test various use cases. Like the TipBot, secure audit trails, timestamping documents, paying for storage etc. it can become a gateway for a sort of sandbox environment, where you can try these apps out and just contribute through that (experimenting with new IOTA-based apps).
domYesterday at 6:02 PM btw, I think IOTA is one of the few projects where the community is contributing a lot of great development, making this really a more decentralized ecosystem. Ethereum has that, and maybe Bitcoin, but I don't know of any other project that has fully working core clients, libraries ,node deployment scripts and services (like the tipbot) like we do
domYesterday at 6:43 PM [I was quoting David a few months ago where target was > 100 CTPS EOY 18] we still aim for that
domYesterday at 6:48 PM [wasn't the tangle taken down regularly by attackers even with the COO? How is a large corp going to commit?] we have a technical roadmap and we stick to that - this includes achieving the KPI's mentioned above. Right now we have to resolve a lot of technical debt from previous years, but we are quickly catching up and making IRI more robust. Private Tangles are great for corporates to experiment right now.
Ralf RottmannYesterday at 3:49 AM I understand the rationale behind it but don’t like how the idea, once people get used to it, might pave the way to transaction-fees. Of course everyone can built businesses on top of IOTA and that is a huge part of building an ecosystem. I just wouldn’t personally endorse the idea to prioritize value tx at this stage of the project. Not meant as an offense!
Roman SemkoYesterday at 4:06 AM Not taken as offence, @Ralf Rottmann ! We are all grown ups to discuss this in a civilized manner. I am not intending to keep this tipsel algo. It is just one temporary node targeting to solve current bottleneck. Nothing more. I am of the same opinion as you on this one.
Ralf RottmannYesterday at 4:08 AM Thanks, @Roman Semko. May I cross-post this to twitter? People seem to somehow think the two of us are enemies... I plan to add Hercules nodes to IOTA.FM over the weekend. If that doesn’t prove otherwise, I don’t know!
8/1
Come-from-BeyondToday at 8:02 AM [any hot news or maybe a riddle to tied us over until the next major development?] Have you seen Li-Fi demo transferring data over 1 km?
Come-from-BeyondToday at 8:06 AM [Link please!] good that no, because it's classified :trollcfb:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jV3RpeJNvbU&feature=youtu.be
David SønstebøToday at 2:26 AM LiFi is part of the start-up of me and @Come-from-Beyond yes, it's a natural extension of enabling a true mist of computing
David SønstebøToday at 2:27 AM [Lifi is a JINN project?] @Crewtons Tied to Jinn Labs, not JINN
8/2
David SønstebøYesterday at 11:04 PM @everyone The IOTA Foundation is revamping and allocating more resources towards its communication strategy at the moment. We consider it pivotal for the success of the project to have a thriving community, a key ingredient in maintaining and growing that is to improve the communication from the Foundation to the community. As part of this new initiative, there will predictable/scheduled blog post updates from the Research, Engineering, Social and Biz Dev/Partnerships departments coming soon.
Research will be posting a new topic delving into the nitty-gritty of IOTA every other Wednesday from now on, starting with today's piece by Alon Gal:
https://twitter.com/iotatoken/status/1024656969590812673
DaveToday at 3:07 AM [Who is HusQy from the IF?] He is working on local snapshots, he will be announced soon
green_protocolToday at 4:42 AM http://www.lighting.philips.com/main/products/lifi Philips Canada and Cisco Canada have demo'ed LIFI
Come-from-BeyondToday at 6:52 AM [call me whatever, ban me if you want, but lifi seems really stupid] agree, so is WiFi and Bluetooth which are just radio which was invented 100 years ago :trollcfb:
Come-from-BeyondToday at 6:55 AM [So, this laser demo, is this for connecting clusters in EC?] no, it's for connecting buildings in cities
Come-from-BeyondToday at 7:03 AM [How I’m going to use lifi on my grandma village! They don’t have light on the streets] that was just few milliWt demo, use few killoWt one and you'll be able to play Star Wars with your friends
Come-from-BeyondToday at 7:05 AM [How you gonna power that 1kW laser] connect to neighbors Bitcoin mining farm, he won't notice that I connected :trollface: [But LiFi isn't new.. What is so special about your LiFi CFB?] 5G is not new too, just radio :trollcfb:
Eric HopToday at 8:51 AM [Can we expect an Qubic update 3.8.?] Yep, of course. 3rd of the month.
8/3
Edward GreveYesterday at 7:37 PM @everyone IRI 1.5.3 is out now! The new version of IRI addresses the blowball problem seen on Mainnet. Download IRI 1.5.3 here. https://github.com/iotaledgeiri/releases/tag/v1.5.3
domYesterday at 4:37 PM Rolf is probably moving on to an even bigger opportunity (maybe even a DAX company). Ralf is still 100% committed to IOTA and is part of the Foundation. once we can share more, we will tell you guys :smiley: Maybe Rolf himself will come on discord.
domYesterday at 4:39 PM [And your work with VW is still intact?] of course same with Fujitsu
domYesterday at 4:39 PM we are still working with them on Industry 4.0 related topics. We are in touch with several different departments there
domYesterday at 4:58 PM [.rolf has been instrumental & a great advocate for IOTA would be a shame to lose such a visionary.] we are not losing him at all :smiley: [has Oliver bussmann left the foundation??] yes, we no longer work with Oliver
[–]domschDominik Schiener - Co-founder of IOTA 32 점 1 일 전에 We will have an update on the data marketplace very soon :)
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Let's talk about Crypto with Spike Cohen! Can Bitcoin Replace Government-Issued Money? A Debate The Great Bitcoin Debate - YouTube Bitcoin to zero debate  Jim Rogers Vs Simon Dixon  Bitcoin HARDTalk #1 Cardano - The Great Debate for a Second Cardano Blockchain

“A bitcoin future would be placing a seal of approval around a very risky, unregulated instrument that has a history of fraud and manipulation,” the firm said in a blog post . The debate is 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern, and you can watch it on ABC and Univision. Hackers target Biden with a Bitcoin scam. who has shown great skill at made-for-social media moments The Great Bitcoin Debate was an event organised by the Bitcoin Melbourne and FinTech Melbourne meetup groups. The event pitted MoneyPlace CEO Stuart Stoyan and Bitcoin Group CEO Sam Lee against each other on very current topic in the FinTech space - Bitcoin is the biggest opportunity in FinTech. Abstract: In this piece we look back at the history of Bitcoin, focusing in on “The Bitcoin Foundation”, once one of the most prominent organisations in the ecosystem. We look at Foundation’s origins and then examine its failings with respect to its governance, transparency and finances, which ultimately led to a total loss of legitimacy within the Bitcoin community. The debate is 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Eastern time. It is being held in Los Angeles and co-hosted by PBS and Politico. Follow our live democratic debate briefing.. There will be no opening statements.

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Let's talk about Crypto with Spike Cohen!

Tonight, a debate series in NY (that I cofounded with Gene Epstein) called the Soho Forum hosted an awesome bitcoin debate with Peter Schiff vs. Erik Voorhees. Resolution: “Bitcoin, or a similar ... Today I had the great opportunity to discuss topics such as Bitcoin, Cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, The FED, and more with Spike Cohen! Spike Cohen is the Vice Presidential Candidate for the ... "Bitcoin is poorly suited to the purpose of becoming any nation's main medium of exchange." That was the topic of a public debate hosted by the Soho Forum in New York City on August 12, 2019. A Debate about bitcoins price movement from a bulish and bearish perspective Hide chat Show chat Autoplay When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next. Simon Dixon interviews billionaire investor, Jim Rogers, where they go head to head to debate Jim's recent comment about Bitcoin going to zero. About Jim Rogers: - A billionaire investor. - He's ...

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