Ultimate Setup Guide for Cryptocurrency Mining with Linux

Make your own stakebox. Ultimate beginners guide how to compile any wallet on AARCH64 (Raspbery pi and other SBC)

I contemplated to wrote this for a long time, so it's finally time.
As you know a lot of altcoins uses PoS (Proof-of-stake) way of "mining" coins. Which basically means, that you hold coins on your unlocked wallet and you are receiving stakes as a reward. This requires very little power and it can bring you a lot of rewards, at just 10W from the wall.
So first I am using latest Raspbian on RPI4B 4GB in this example.Setting up Raspbian is not part of this process since it's very well documented. I recommend to change user from pi to something else due to security concerns and you can also do other stuff just search "security Raspberry PI" and you find a lot of articles, but this is not the focus of this guide.
I know there are a lot of guides on the internet, but I am using like 5 sources, so it's compiled what other people wrote and some of my research.
I am using AnyDesk insted of SSH or VNC server, because it works it's ligthweit and it just works.
So after you see the gui of Raspbian, just launch terminal (CTRL + ALT + T) and do basic thing:
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
Than press Y and let it run, after is finished, we need to prepare so dependency packages. Since most of the wallets using Berkeley DB 4.8 we need to obtain it.
So in terminal wrote:
cd cd Downloads wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz tar -xzvf db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz cd db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix ../dist/configure --enable-cxx make sudo make install 
So wait unti it's finished and than you can delete files in Downloads folder in gui or use:
sudo rm -r [folder] 
So next thing we need to install some libraries.
sudo apt-get install git build-essential libtool autotools-dev autoconf pkg-config libssl-dev libcrypto++-dev libevent-dev libminiupnpc-dev libgmp-dev libboost-all-dev devscripts libdb++-dev libsodium-dev 
And pres y and let it run. After that another set of libraries:
sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libcrypto++- dev libminiupnpc-dev qt5-default 
And then again pres y and let it run. Some wallets need older version of libssl1.0-dev, so for for safe compiling we install that as well:
sudo apt-get install libssl1.0-dev 
Pres y and let it run. Warning don't use sudo-apt get autoremove, since it would wipe this package, since it's old.
Next thing we are going to obtain Bitcoin PPA filest, which can be done like this.
cd /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ sudo nano bitcoin.list 
Paste this in there:
deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin/bitcoin/ubuntu artful main 
And CTRL+X and than y, then do this:
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv C70EF1F0305A1ADB9986DBD8D46F45428842CE5E sudo apt-get update 
So now we are ready for compiling. So we are going create folders. CD yourself where this folder should be situated, if you for example have plugged in some external drive. Then:
mkdir Crypto cd Crypto 
And then we have to choose wallet which you want to compile. I am choosing Streamies (STRMS) as an example, since it's pretty good coin for staking. So:
mkdir Streamies cd Streamies 
Then go to the github page and click on the green button on the left and click copy to clipboard, which gives you git link.
git clone https://github.com/Streamies/Streamies.git 
Watch the output folder which it creates, it's stated in the first two lines and copy then by highliting the text and CTRL+SHIFT+C copy it to your clipboard.
cd Streamies (this is that git created folder) ./autogen.sh ./configure CPPFLAGS="-I/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/include -O2" LDFLAGS="-L/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib" sudo make (this could take hours) sudo make install 
And you are done, files is going to be in folder /uslocal/bin (DO NOT delete git created folder, because you are going to need it for faster compiling, when wallet get's and update.)
cd /uslocal/bin 
Now you can list files by:
ls 
And then you can copy/move them where ever you want by using:
sudo mv * [destination full path] 
Let it run and go back to folder where you move those files.
sudo chmod +x streamies-qt (since we want to run wallet) 
In most cases compiled files are going to in format of "shared library" so we need to create script to run it. Open up a text editor from gui or through nano. And paste this to that file:
#!/bin/bash ./streamies-qt 
And save it as a sh file, for example run.sh. Then we need to make it runnable so:
sudo chmod +x run.sh 
Now to run it, it's just:
./run.sh 
And here we are glorious GUI wallet appears and you are done, you can paste blockchain, wallet.dat from other sources, so this migration is pretty easy and you, if you have it on for exaple flash disk.
So this is basic how to compile QT wallets on AARCH64. I am running 7 wallets, 2 of those are Masternodes and RPI 4B 4GB would handle way more, I am at best on half of my RAM.
Some wallets need more package, but it's not much of and issue, since compiling stops and you just copy paste nape which is missing put it in the google and add "apt-get" after the name of package and you are going to see, what is the name of the packages so it can be retreived from package assinstant aka apt-get. So basically:
sudo apt-get install [package name] 
Then press y and again wrote:
sudo make 
This process is going to continue where it was left off, so nothing is going to run from beginning.
Updating wallets is basically exactly same, just repeat steps from "git clone" and after that proceed as it was written above.
So I hope this helps some of you, to use this at home and not on some VPS, if you are anxious as me, to host my wallets on remote server.
submitted by M1chlCZ to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Dogecoin on Linux - The Complete Beginner's Guide

I'm writing this because I couldn't find a single condensed guide on compiling the wallet and running mining software on linux, specficially Ubuntu/Linux Mint. I combed Bitcoin and Litecoin forums for similar problems I was running into and eventually got everything nailed down, so here it is in one place, for new Shibes.
If you want to make a Dogecoin directory in your downloads folder to keep things organized, you will need to modify these commands to refelct the change. So instead of going to ~/Downloads/ you will need to go to ~/Downloads/Dogecoin and be sure to put the zipped files there when you download them, but the commands will be the same otherwise.
cwayne18 put in the work to make a PPA for the QT client here.
Ubunutu/Mint/Debian users should be able to install the client with the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cwayne18/doge sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dogecoin-qt 
To update using this method, run
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade dogecoin-qt 
Compiling the Wallet Manually
I suggest using the PPA above, but if you want to compile manually, here you go.
1)Download the newest source from here. If you want to check out the Github page, click here
2)Unzip the package with the native client OR, navigate to your downloads and unzip
cd ~/Downloads unzip dogecoin-master.zip 
3)Now it's time to compile. You will need to install the dependencies, just copy and paste the following code. It will be a fairly large download and could take some time. It is always important to update before installing any new software, so we'll do that first and then install the dependencies.
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install libssl-dev libdb-dev libdb++-dev libqrencode-dev qt4-qmake libqtgui4 libqt4-dev sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev libminiupnpc8 libboost-all-dev build-essential git libboost1.53-all-dev 
4)Once that is done, go to the doge-coin master directory and compile:
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste sed -i 's/-mgw46-mt-sd-1_53//g' dogecoin-qt.pro qmake USE_UPNP=- USE_QRCODE=0 USE_IPV6=0 make -j3 
After running the qmake command you will likely see some text similar to
Project MESSAGE: Building without UPNP support Project MESSAGE: Building with UPNP supportRemoved plural forms as the target language has less forms. If this sounds wrong, possibly the target language is not set or recognized. 
It's perfectly normal, so don't worry about that.
Your Dogewallet is ready to go! The executable is in ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste and called dogecoin-qt. Your wallet information is in ~/.dogecoin. You can run the wallet at any time by opening terminal and typing
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste ./dogecoin-qt 
Future upgrades to dogewallet are easy. Back up your wallet.dat, and simply follow the same directions above, but you'll be unzipping and building the newer version. You will likely need to rename the old dogecoin-master directory in ~/Downloads before unzipping the newest version and building. Also, it is likely that you will not need to install the dependencies again.
Alternate Method For Installing Dogecoin Wallet from Nicebreakfast
After installing the dependencies listed in step 3, open terminal, then navigate to where you want Dogecoin Wallet stored and run:
git clone https://github.com/dogecoin/dogecoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make 
then when the wallet is updated just run
git pull 
from the dogecoin directory.
GPU Mining
GPU mining requires CGminer. My suggestion is to get the executable already built. The creator of cgminer has removed the built file from his website, but I've uploaded it here
sudo apt-get install pkg-config opencl-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev autoconf libtool automake m4 ncurses-dev cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built.tar.bz2 
Don't use anything newer than 3.7.2. The newer versions of CGMiner don't support GPU mining.
That's it! You have cgminer ready to go! You will run cgminer with the following syntax
cd ~/Downloads/cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built/ ./cgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://SERVERNAME:PORT -u WORKER.ID -p PASS 
A good guide for fine tuning cgminer can be found here; follow the litecoin example.
EDIT
I had trouble getting cgminer running with a single line command, but running it via an executable .sh file works. This is covered in the cgminer setup guide I posted above but I'll put it here too. In the same directory that has the cgminer executable, you need to make a file called cgminer.sh and make it executable. It should contain the follwing:
export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export DISPLAY=:0 find *.bin -delete sleep 5 ./cgminer 
Then you can call cgminer in terminal by doing ./cgminer.sh You will need a cgminer.conf file containing all your options. All of this is covered in the guide that is linked above.
A quick note about AMD drivers: They used to be a huge PITA to install and get working, but the newest Catalyst drivers are great. There's a GUI installer, everything works out of the box, and there is a lot of documentation. You can download them here: AMD Catalyst 14.6 Beta Linux
CPU Mining
For CPU mining I use minerd because it doesn't require any work to get running, simply download it and get to work. Download the built file for your machine 32-bit or 64-bit, and then unzip it and you're ready to go!
cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf pooler-cpuminer-2.3.2-linux-x86.tar.gz 
The executable is called minerd and it will be in ~/Downloads but you can move it to wherever you like. To run it, pull up terminal and do
cd ~/Downloads minerd --url=stratum+tcp://SERVER:PORT --userpass=USERNAME.WORKERNAME:WORKERPASSWORD 
You're done! Happy mining!
Common Issues
I ran into this and I've seen others with this problem as well. Everything installs fine but there is a shared library file that isn't where it should be. In fact, it isn't there at all.
 libudev.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory 
In terminal, do
sudo updatedb locate libudev.so.0.13.0 
And it will probably return a path /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu. Inside that directory there's a library file called libudev.so.0.13.0. You'll need to make a symlink (aka shortcut) that links libudev.so.1 to libudev.so.0.13.0 So, assuming you're working with libudev.so.0.13.0 do this
cd /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu sudo ln -s libudev.so.0.13.0 libudev.so.1 
Now if you do
ln -l 
You should see
libudev.so.1 -> ./libudev.so.0.13.0 
Meaning you've made the symlink. Also, the text for libudev.so.1 will be blue.
submitted by Boozybrain to dogecoin [link] [comments]

How to Mine BiblePay on Linux

This guide is outdated, please refer to:
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POBH_Setup
https://wiki.biblepay.org/PODC_Setup
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPORTANT - Evolution Upgrade:
Quick Start https://wiki.biblepay.org/Quick_Start
Evolution Upgrade Information https://wiki.biblepay.org/Evolution_Upgrade
Getting Started with Evolution https://wiki.biblepay.org/Getting_Started_with_Evolution
Generic Smart Contracts https://wiki.biblepay.org/Generic_Smart_Contracts
What is BiblePay Evolution? https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/bifvpk/biblepay_evolution_what_is_it/
Recommend 2GB RAM or can get stuck compiling (if 1GB RAM can use Swap File) Use Ubuntu 16.04
INFO
https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/masteBuildBiblePay.txt
INSTALL COMMANDS
apt-get install build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config libssl-dev libevent-dev bsdmainutils apt-get install libboost-system-dev libboost-filesystem-dev libboost-chrono-dev libboost-program-options-dev libboost-test-dev libboost-thread-dev apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler apt-get install git apt-get install curl build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config python3 bsdmainutils cmake sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libdb4.8-dev libdb4.8++-dev git clone http://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution prefix=x86_64-pc-linux-gnu cd biblepay-evolution/depends make -j4 # Choose a good -j value, depending on the number of CPU cores available cd .. ./autogen.sh #Note: if echo `pwd` does not return your working directory, replace it with your working directory such as /biblepay-evolution/ ./configure --prefix `pwd`/depends/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu make # See more here: #https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/mastedoc/build-unix.md 

SWAP FILE
NOTE: if server is 1GB RAM, before running last command "sudo make", set up a swap file
free #check if swap is 0 dd if=/dev/zero of=/vaswap.img bs=1024k count=1000 mkswap /vaswap.img swapon /vaswap.img free #check if swap is 1024 sudo make 

RUN COMMAND LINE
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon 
OR
RUN GUI
Your GUI program will be located in: /biblepay-evolution/src/qt
./biblepay-qt 
You can also run it in the background (to free up your terminal) if you call it with:
./biblepay-qt & 
To start mining, instructions are the same as for Windows: Go to Tools -> Debug Console
Execute this command (to start mining with 8 threads)
setgenerate true 8 
From there you can use all other commands such as getmininginfo, getwalletinfo, etc. Execute help command to get the list of all available commands.
Note: GUI will be built automatically only if you meet the requirements for qt library, i.e. make sure you ran this line before compiling:
sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler 
BIBLEPAY is now Running!

SETUP CONFIG
Stop BiblePay and set up the config file to get starting nodes to sync with and enable mining:
./biblepay-cli stop cd ~/.biblepayevolution/ vi biblepay.conf addnode=node.biblepay.org gen=1 genproclimit=1 
Escape Key + : (Colon Key) + w + q + Enter (saves file and quits)

addnode --- adds a node to the list of nodes to connect to gen=1 --- turns on mining genproclimit --- sets number of threads to use when mining

Run BiblePay again and fully sync with network
cd ../biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo 

USEFUL COMMANDS
./biblepay-cli help ./biblepay-cli getaccountaddress "" ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 ./biblepay-cli sendtoaddress "insertAddressHere" 777 "" "" true ./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon top #CPU usage q to quit 

MINING THREADS: To change number of threads to use up for mining
a. Edit home/yourusername/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file:
genproclimit=X 
and restart BiblePay -or- b. Menu >> Tools >> Debug Console >> Type command:
setgenerate true X 
(Replace X with number of threads Use top command to view CPU usage)

POOL
NOTE: To use the pool you must now use the external miner, not the wallet miner https://whitewalr.us/2019/biblepay-nomp-pool-mining.html
  1. Set up an account on pool website: https://pool.biblepay.org/
  2. Create Worker Username(s) - Workers tab >>> Add
  3. Enable pool and add Worker Username in ~/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file, add these lines and save:
    pool=https://pool.biblepay.org workerid=insertWorkerUsernameHere
4. Restart BiblePay
./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon 
Setup Auto-Withdraw Navigate to Account >>> Account Settings >>> Verify your BBP Receiving Address >>> Click Authorize-Auto-Withdraws

UPDATE:

### Turn off/stop BiblePay
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepay-cli stop 

### Pull down latest Biblepay code and build it
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution git pull origin master sudo make 

### Turn BiblePay back on and check version number
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 

UPDATE IN ONE COMMAND:
./biblepay-evolution/src/biblepay-cli stop ; cd && cd biblepay-evolution/ && git pull origin master && sudo make && cd src && ./biblepayd -daemon && sleep 90 && ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo 
Note: the ";" says do this after, regardless of the outcome Note: && says do this after only if previous command finished with no errors

SPEED UP COMPILE:
To speed up the compile time, add -j4 or -j8 after make. This way it compiles using 4 or 8 threads instead of just 1.
./configure LDFLAGS="-L${BDB_PREFIX}/lib/" CPPFLAGS="-I${BDB_PREFIX}/include/" sudo make -j8 
Reference: http://www.linux-databook.info/?page_id=2319

RSYNC stop biblepay from your nodes compile on your fastest machine then rsync with your machines only src folder is required
rsync -avuz /root/biblepay-evolution/src/ [email protected]:/root/biblepay-evolution/src/ 
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3299951/how-to-pass-password-for-rsync-ssh-command https://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/11/3-steps-to-perform-ssh-login-without-password-using-ssh-keygen-ssh-copy-id/
people make cron jobs and rsync automatically

OUTDATED

Unofficial Bash Script
https://gist.github.com/anonymous/d1c1d35e3c8f67f5fb2e204479fa5c6b

Official Ubuntu Package
https://launchpad.net/~biblepay-official

Unofficial Ubuntu Package
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7rwqqs/unofficial_ubuntu_packages_available/

Unofficial Mine in One Line
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7ryuk1/mine_in_one_line/
NOTE: DONT RUN ON A COMPUTER WITH COINS -- THIS IS A CLEAN INSTALL SCRIPT

COMPILE WITHOUT GUI: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878317#msg21878317 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878389#msg21878389
ADVANCED:

DOCKER IMAGES (NOTE: I havent tested these, use at your own risk) https://hub.docker.com/gagaha/biblepay/ https://hub.docker.com/cryptozero/biblepay-opt/
submitted by togoshige to BiblePay [link] [comments]

Zeus/Gaw ASIC Setup Guide for Linux/Raspberry Pi

So I recently I became quite interested in mining and cyptocurrencies in general. So interested in fact that I bit the bullet and decided to buy myself a GAW Fury.
I then spent some time doing research on how to set up a GAW or Zeus ASIC on Linux, in particular on a Raspberry Pi, and have found most guides to be awful. The reason they are so bad IMHO is that they assume quite a bit of prior knowledge, either with Linux or mining, and give very little instructions. So I have tried to put together a guide that requires very little prior knowledge.
It is my aim that anyone could get their shiny new asic up and mining in no time using this guide. Anyway, I present...

The Complete Noobs Guide to Setting Up a Zeus or Gaw ASIC on Debian/Ubuntu/Raspberry Pi

Resources

About Cyrptocurrencies and Their Jargon

If you are new to cryptocurrencies and how they work I suggest taking a look at this series of KhanAcademy videos. They are for Bitcoin but the theory is the same. I found them very helpful when it came to understanding what mining actually does and the mechanics of cyrptocurrencies.
Also take a look at sircamm22 his info found here, is great and breaks down a large number of concepts. I slightly disagree with no. 21 regarding preordering. Just exercise common sense.

Linux

If you are new to Linux you could follow along by simply typing in the commands. However I highly recommend taking the time to learn what you are doing. This course is a great place to start.

Computer Setup

By the end of this section you will have your device turned on, fully setup and connected to the internet with.
Note: Commands to be typed into the command line will be displayed like this:
echo Hello World

Desktop/Laptop

For laptops and desktops already running Ubuntu or Debian I will assume you have setup your internet setup as part of the installation.
If not: There are plenty of guides out there and the installation/setup process is very easy. A good place to start for Ubuntu is here.
Now open up a terminal window. Ctrl + alt + t on a standard Ubuntu installation.
If you plan on using this PC without a monitor I would suggest installing an SSH Server.
These commands will be discussed later on in the guide.
sudo apt-get -y install openssh-server
sudo service openssh-server start

Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has put together a great guide in PDF format.
Use NOOBS it will save you a lot of trouble. NB: Some SD cards don't support NOOBs but will work fine if the image is put on using a different method.
Here is a great guide for setting up the Raspberry Pi SD card from Elinux.org. In fact it's a great place to start for anything RPi related. Raspberry Pi hub at Elinux.
Once the SD card is setup you will need to insert it into the Raspberry Pi and boot. Install Raspbian from the NOOBs menu and wait.
Follow this guide by Adafruit for first time setup. You will need to enable SSH Server.
I suggest not starting the desktop on boot. It can be easily run from the command line by typing startx.
Follow this guide by Adafruit to setup your network. Found here. No need to do this if you set up previously in the first time config.
We will also at this point want to setup ssh. Again I will point you to an Adafruit guide.
Once done exit back to a standard command line interface. This can be done in LXDE by using the power off menu located in the bottom right corner.

Miner Setup

Installing BFGMiner

If you want to the Raspberry Pi or PC without a monitor go ahead and SSH into your device.
So now you should be staring at a command line interface whether on the device with a monitor or via SSH.
First things first lets make sure we are all up to date. This will update our package list from the repositories and upgrade them to the newest version. "-y" Will simply say yes to any prompts.
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get -y upgrade
We are going to need to install some useful tools. Git-core is how we will clone and download BFGMiner from GitHub and Screen allows multiple command line instances and means if we exit out of ssh session or quit Terminal on Ubuntu, BFGMiner will continue to run.
sudo apt-get install git-core screen
We also need to download some other tools/dependencies to ensure that BFGMiner will compile successfully.
sudo apt-get -y install build-essential autoconf automake libtool pkg-config libcurl4-gnutls-dev libjansson-dev uthash-dev libncursesw5-dev libudev-dev libusb-1.0-0-dev libevent-dev libmicrohttpd-dev libc-bin
Ok now change into your home directory.
cd ~
And clone BFGMiner by Darkwinde.
git clone https://github.com/Darkwinde/bfgminer.git
Once the download has completed move into the bfgminer directory.
cd bfgminer
The following steps may take a while.
Now run autogen.sh
sudo ./autogen.sh
You will need to make the configure script execuitable.
sudo chmod +x ./configure
Now configure bfgminer
sudo ./configure CFLAGS="-O3" --enable-scrypt
Now lets make!
sudo make
Install BFGMiner
sudo make install
One more thing...
sudo ldconfig

Running BFGMiner

If you haven't already plug in your ASIC.
Just confirm your system is recognising the ASIC.
lsusb
Its output should look similar to this (no need to type this in):
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 10c4:ea60 Cygnal Integrated Products, Inc. CP210x UART Bridge / myAVR mySmartUSB light
Yep there it is our ASIC listed as device 005. There is no need to install any drivers, unlike in windows, as they come in the kernel.
Now lets actually start BFGMiner.
You will want to start a screen session to ensure BFGMiner doesn't quite when you exit.
"-S" is the option for starting a new screen session. You can replace "miner" with anything you like.
screen -S miner
Now you can run the commands below.
Here is a sample of what you should type. You will need to replace somethings with your own values.
sudo bfgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://URL:PORT -u USERNAME -p PASSWORD --zeus-cc CHIPCOUNT --zeus-clk 328 -S zeus:/dev/ttyUSB0
Where:
URL:PORT is the address and port of the pool you wih to use. Now I won't suggest a pool. I will leave that decision up to you. If you do wish to mine DOGE take a look at this site for a list of pools and comparisons.
USERNAME this is the username you use on the pool. Every pool is different. Check your pool's website for details. PASSWORD same as above. Specific to your pool, not every pool requires one.
CHIPCOUNT this is specific to which ASIC you are using.
For GAWMiner ASIC's:
  • War Machine: 256
  • Falcon: 128
  • Black Widow: 64
  • Fury: 6
For ZeusMiner ASIC's:
  • Blizzard: 6
  • Cyclone: 96
  • Hurricane X2: 48
  • Hurricane X3: 64
  • Thunder X2: 96
  • Thunder X3: 128
Now to make sure you don't stop mining when you exit ssh or terminal. Press:
ctrl + a + d
To come back to the BFGMiner screen simply run:
screen -r miner
You're done!!

Start on Boot

First off you will want to make sure you have BFGMiner running correctly. Ensure you have the miners set up properly and your pool correctly configured.
Start a BFGMiner instance, detailed above.
Once the instance has started and you are happy with how everything is working press "s" on your keyboard to enter the settings menu.
Now press the "w" key. Don't press enter. We want to specify where our config will go. Type:
/home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Substitute USERNAME for your user. On a standard RPI install its pi. On ubuntu it's what you set during the instillation.
Now press the enter key to return back to the main BFGMiner screen. Press "q" on your keyboard to exit BFGMiner. You should now be back in the command line.
Now we want to edit a file called rc.local. Any commands in this file will be executed on boot.
sudo nano /etc/rc.local
Depending on your system this file may already contain some commands. Be careful not to delete them.
After the last command and before "exit 0" type the following on one line:
sudo -u USERNAME screen -d -m sudo bfgminer --config /home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Where USERNAME = your username
Hit ctrl + x then y to save and exit nano.
The above command will create a new screen session and run bfgminer using the config we created earlier. All while as our username so that we can easily reattach.
Lets reboot to ensure it is working correctly:
sudo reboot
Once rebooted and logged in, show all running screen sessions:
screen -ls
Reattach to the session. You only need to use the numbers before the first dot.
e.g Mine looks like: 2480..hostname (13/07/14 12:02:09) (Detached). So I type:
screen -r 2480
Verify everything worked as expected. Then ctrl + a + d to exit.
You have now setup BFGMiner to restart on reboot.

Power Failure

If you are using a Raspberry Pi and it loses power it will automatically reboot on receiving power again.
For standard desktop PCs there is an option in some BIOS/UEFI to turn the computer on when it receives power. Consult your motherboard's manual and manufacturer's website.

Sources

Here is where I got my info from.
And of course /dogemining

Wrap Up

Congrats you've done it. You have managed to successfully get your shiny new asic mining away.
I do plan to make another guide detailing how to setup and use StarMiner a ready to go RPi mining distro.
So I hope this is helpful for you guys. I have seen lots of posts asking the exact same questions again and again and I have tried to answer these as best I can. I am still learning about this stuff so if there is something I have missed or a mistake I have made please tell me.
Anyway good luck. And I'll see you at the moon.
Cheers Frogsiedoodle
Edit 1: Layout and formatting.
Edit 2: Added instructions for screen which I initially forgot.
Edit 3: Removed 1 unneeded dependency
Edit 4: Added section on start on reboot and power failure.
submitted by Frogsiedoodle to dogemining [link] [comments]

How To Mine Doge with Ubuntu 13.10. (Part 1, for AMD Graphics Cards)

I feel the community really needs a resource like this. Because if I had a Doge for every-time taught a newbie how to Mine on Ubuntu, I would be a very rich doge!
EDIT: Sorry if it looks funny, Reddit doesn't like the numbers I put in for some reason.
If you have Ubuntu you have likely not upgraded because you think you cant mine on 13.10, and while that has been true in the past, a few people have got it figured out. So feel free to upgrade. If you are not on Ubuntu, Seriously you should consider using it. Even if its just on an older desktop.
Alright, so lets get a few things clear, I am assuming that you just FRESHLY installed Ubuntu 13.10 x64 on your system. I am assuming that you have no drivers, and no miners. You will need at least a key board and a mouse. The guide will be done in several parts, this first part is for most AMD Graphics cards. If you have an Nvidia, or just want to mine with your CPU, please check back later for those guides!
When reading this guide, please remember that as I give you commands to type into the terminal, Anything between { and} must be included. Do not copy and paste the {}.
Lets get started, If you have not already done so, Install Ubuntu 13.10 64Bit From Here (http://www.ubuntu.com/index_asus.html)
*1. Lets start by making sure you are up to date. Open up the terminal and enter this:
{sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade} 
Let that run for a bit.
*2. Once that has finished we are going to download some applications we will need:
{sudo apt-get install dh-make dh-modaliases execstack libxrandr2 libice6 libsm6 libfontconfig1 libxi6 libxcursor1 libgl1-mesa-glx libxinerama1 libqtgui4} 
*3. Once that has run its course we are going to install the ssh server. Remember this command is going to make your computer shut down. While it is shut down, carefully install your graphics cards. If you don't have any experience with this, I suggest you 3 minutes to watch this guide, because failure to install a graphics card the right way can destroy it.
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9x097QRXeA)
{sudo apt-get install openssh-server sudo shutdown now} 
*4.Install your Card(s) and turn the computer back on.
*5. Make a new folder called "AMD DRIVERS123" inside of your download folder. Downoad the following 3 things into that folder. (1. AMD Drivers: http://support.amd.com/en-us/download/incomplete) (2. AMD APP SDK: http://developer.amd.com/tools-and-sdks/heterogeneous-computing/amd-accelerated-parallel-processing-app-sdk/downloads/) (3. AMD ADL SDK:http://developer.amd.com/tools-and-sdks/graphics-development/display-library-adl-sdk/)
*6. Ok, now we need to unzip and compile those drivers. So, open a terminal my right clicking inside of "AMD DRIVERS123". The enter this:
{unzip amd-catalyst*.zip chmod +x amd-catalyst*.run} {sudo ./amd-catalyst*.run --buildpkg Ubuntu/saucy} 
*7. Now we need to install the drivers. Enter the code exactly as you see it, don't worry, the first command will fail, we are expecting it too.
{sudo dpkg -i fglrx*.deb} {sudo apt-get -f install} {sudo dpkg -i fglrx*.deb} {sudo reboot} 
Your computer should now reboot.
(If this failed, you probibly need to remove the old drivers. Do this
{cd /etc/default sudo pico grub} 
Change the line:
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nomodeset" 
Now save by pressing [CTRL+x]
{sudo update-grub} this will make the change perminent. {sudo reboot -n} Reboot with new settings. Once it starts back up try installing the new drivers again.) 
*8.GREAT! You are really on a roll! Now we need to update AtiConfig
{sudo aticonfig --initial --adapter=all} 
*9.Time to install the APP ADK:
{tar xvf AMD-APP-SDK*.tgz} {sudo ./Install-AMD-APP.sh} {sudo reboot} 
*10. WOOT! You are so close to diggin that sweet Doge!! Its time to download CGMiner. IMPORTANT NOTE! You need to get CGminer 3.7, IT IS THE ONLY ONE THAT WILL WORK. Do not get any older or newer, Just this. :
{sudo apt-get install git unzip git clone -b 3.7 https://github.com/ckolivas/cgminer} 
*11. Ok, now go back to "AMD DRIVERS123", Unzip AMD SDL SDK 6.0. Once you have it unzipped, go the file called "include", open it up, copy everything inside, then go find CGminer. Copy these files into the CGminer file called ADL_SDK.
*12. To install CGminer, we are going to need a few things. Get all of these.
{sudo apt-get install build-essential autoconf libtool libcurl4-openssl-dev libncurses5-dev pkg-config libudev-dev} 
*13. Lets go ahead and compile CGminer.
{cd cgminer} {./autogen.sh} 
*14. Ok, when you did that, it told you GPU was not supported, time to fix it.
{./configure --enable-opencl --enable-scrypt} 
(if you did it right you should now get this: OpenCL...............: FOUND. GPU mining support enabled scrypt...............: Enabled ADL..................: SDK found, GPU monitoring support enabled)
*15. If everything has been good so far then
{make} 
*16. MATHEMATICAL! Now lets get it set up to run a test.
{nano test.sh} {!/bin/bash export DISPLAY=:0 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1} {./cgminer -n} 
*17. Now save by hitting [Control+x][y][Enter]
*18.Lastly lets CHmod test.sh
{chmod+x test.sh} 
*19. TIME TO RUN THE TEXT!!!
{./test.sh} 
(If your output looks like this your ready to go!!! CL Platform 0 vendor: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. CL Platform 0 name: AMD Accelerated Parallel Processing CL Platform 0 version: OpenCL 1.2 AMD-APP (1214.3) Platform 0 devices: 1 0 Tahiti GPU 0 AMD Radeon HD 7900 Series hardware monitoring enabled 1 GPU devices max detected)
*20. Excellent! Now we have it installed, its time to pick 2-3 pools, and get accounts set up at each of them. I currently use These 2, and If I find another I like I'll update. If you have a really awesome pool you would like me to include on the list, feel free to message me.
Pools: http://doge.cryptovalley.com/ (great community, server not super stable, but they have a chat. I hang out here a lot under the handle 'StrongBad' feel free to stop buy and ask questions)
https://dogehouse.org/ (Super stable pool, Great contests, super friendly, and they pay your miner a bonus if you find the block!)
Choose your pools, go to their sites and sign up. VERY IMPORTANT!!! Use different usernames and passwords for every mining site. If one site gets hacked, you don't want to give them a way to steal everything!!!!! Don't worry about the worker names and passwords being unique or complex tho, the most they can do with this is mine for you.
*21. Ok, now go to the CGminer folder, and open up a Terminal Window.
{sudo ./cgminer} 
This should start ./cgminer up with some really basic settings, and not pointed at any pool. Lets fix that: First press [p] to go to pool settings Now [A] and enter the information for the 1st pool. For instance if you are signing on for dogehouse: (Input server details: stratum+tcp://stratum.dogehouse.org:3333 Username: 'yourusername.workername password: 'yourpassword') If you got no errors, you did it right! Your miner should now connect and start to mine very slowly.
Now, do the same thing for all your other pools. the reason we do this is because Doge Coin pools are constantly being DDoS attacked, and this way your worker automatically switches over to a good pool if one go's down.
*22. time to save your current settings press [Enter] to get back out to the main menu, then [s] to bring up settings. Now press [W] to write a Config file. Name it DogeCoin.conf, and make sure to save it in the location it directs you too.
*23.OK! So, now we have everything set up to its basics. What you need to do now is sit down, and fine tune your Card(s). Its really early in the morning, and I need to get some sleep, I will add more on how to tune your card tomorrow in another post, and link it HERE:
Or, I will help you find the best configuration for your card(s). However as this is quite a bit of work, I do charge a small fee. Contact me with your card(s) information and I will get back to you right away. I generally let you decide how much to pay me.
This is my first ever guide on reddit! If you enjoyed it, or if it helped you please remember to upvote! I am going to start doing an educational YouTube series about Bitcoin, and will likely be doing a side program about Doge, if I find time and funding!! You can find that here: All tips are appreciated! DPTwcQreASwzt6TeWBWFb6Kz9ZU5Sezvr9 If you have any Questions, feel free to ask, I will get back to you ASAP.
Happy Digging everybody!
submitted by Sonofchange to Dogecoinmining [link] [comments]

Optional Beginner Guide to Litecoin: TESTED 12/7/2013

Plan B: BAMT Live USB
This option is a last resort, hopefully not necessary. Download BAMT from the link below and "dd" via terminal to USB formatted to FAT32 in gparted. You can install gparted in xubuntu by typing:
sudo apt-get install gparted 
Next, launch gparted and format your USB drive. Be careful not to format your HDDs! You might double-check the storage sizes as a reference in the upper-right drop-down menu.
Download link: https://mega.co.nz/#!NI5W2QLT!dYt2UTZz0hrFoiMUAu0d01eSD4pjqXHT6U2UtnAAGJ4
Extract the file and locate "litecoinbamt1.1.img"
Put image on 2GB or greater USB formatted to FAT32 by opening terminal and running:
sudo dd if=/path/to/litecoinbamt1.1.img of=/dev/sdX (The "X" is the device name of your usb key. The one you will have seen in gparted, for example "sdb, or sdc, or sdd..." Try to get the right device on the first try. Use raw device *not* a partition.) sudo dd if=(you can drag and drop file into the terminal here to get the path) of=/dev/sdX 
CAN TAKE 15 MINUTES or more.
Perhaps try newer release of BAMT: https://mega.co.nz/#!qZ1TXRxD!Mcw8pkrP4SQE8D7bIfmZZEola01hxVFtbOBg6Cr3Zeo
sudo dd if=/path/to/litecoinbamt1.2.img of=/dev/sdX 
(source: http://www.bitcointrading.com/forum/linux-distros/bamt-version-0-5-easy-usb-based-mining-linux-with-farm-wide-management-tools/)
Plan A: Xubuntu BFGminer
Step 1: Get prepared. This is for a FRESH install of Xubuntu 13.10. Start with a fresh installation. Run the following in the terminal, line by line, one at a time. Press enter after each.
sudo apt-get install fglrx-updates fglrx-amdcccle-updates fglrx-updates-dev sudo aticonfig --lsa sudo aticonfig --adapter=all --initial sudo reboot 
(source: http://www.cryptobadger.com/2013/04/build-a-litecoin-mining-rig-linux/)
sudo apt-get install libcurl4-openssl-dev pkg-config libtool libncurses5-dev libudev-dev screen xterm sudo apt-get install git-core sudo apt-get install openssh-server byobu sudo apt-get install autoconf sudo apt-get install automake 
(source: https://coinaxis.com/index.php/entry/how-to-configure-linux-and-build-cgminer-for-bitcoin-and-litecoin)
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:unit3/bfgminer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install bfgminer sudo apt-get upgrade 
To launch:
bfgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://world.wemineltc.com:3334 -u workername -p password -I 13 
(source: http://jarco.be/install-bfgminer-ubuntu-mint/)
submitted by Marco_X to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

SIGSEGV and Segmentation Fault Core Dumped

Ok, so basically this is a throwaway account. I'm typing this for people who google some or all keywords in the title and don't get anywhere, and get frustrated.
I built a box for bitcoin mining then repurposed it for develoment. It has 32 Gigs memory, I've memchecked it twice and the memchecks passed.
I installed android studio, which devs will do. And pycharm community, and went about my day. Or days, or weeks. But not months, because what has eventually happened is that rebooting doesn't fix anything.
So basically today I got home at around 6 and started working, it's 8:30 and I haven't gotten anything done. Why not? NOTHING WORKS. I mean NOTHING. You think I am exaggerating, but I'm really not!
So I started out with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. And when you boot up there are a ton of errors, especially if you don't have a sound device, which I don't. So you get a lot of ALSA errors. Every time you boot up you have to click 'ok', 'ok', 'ok', to get rid of them. Pulse audio or alsa, or both.
Then I said, hm, maybe 16.04 is better and installed it (it's not). But I had to get work done, so I stuck with it and just rebooted anytime 1) I couldn't get a terminal shell window with ALT-T or 2) Red dash in upper right indicating that there was a problem fetching updates or 3) android studio shell script crashed when I attempted to launch android studio with a segmentation fault again. If you configure the Oracle JDK and inject it as SDK_HOME in the command line to run studio.sh, you can still run it, but it's hardly fun to have to do this several times daily.
So then I said, to myself, cause you weren't around, I said, "Maybe I should try xubuntu." It's really the same as ubuntu. I don't know what people are talking about when they say it's different.
So now I'm packing it up as we speak and moving to linux mint. I hope that I don't have to pack up and move again, because it's really cutting into my productivity.
This post is so that you know you're not alone. I google a ton, of course, and many are what I call ubuntu-apologists. They simply refuse to acknowledge how difficult ubuntu is to work with. (Myself, I hate to say a good thing about windows, but it's about 100 times easier to develop on a windows machine, and if Linux Mint gives me guff, I will go back to Windows 7.)
It would seem that in the minds of some, no one should ever say a bad thing about ubuntu. BUT IT STINKS.
Your best ubuntu bet is to not build your own box but to buy a Dell. Then immediately, before doing anything else, dump Open JDK. Don't install even geany or gedit. Get rid of anything related to Open JDK and install the Oracle one. This is the only way that you can make ubuntu usable, which is on the way to "enjoyable."
Pycharm. I had the community edition and was getting SIGSEGV faults. Rebooting would solve the problem, but not always. Like an idiot, I installed the update (2.3 to 3), which promised better functionality for Python 3.5.2. Instead, it said "permission denied" every time I attempted to use 3.5.2. (Oddly, 2.7 was no problem. Don't even get me started on 2.7.x vs 3.5.x -- 3.5.x seems pointless!)
In the end, I think that ubuntu is a great and nifty idea and I'll cheer for it, but it's just not for professionals.
I fully expect people to tell me I know nothing, or that I should be compiling ubuntu from source or something. One solution to a problem on stack overflow was to debug the application causing the segmentation fault! Perhaps the problem at ubuntu or canonical is actually the number of people who CAN compile ubuntu from source!
submitted by PrivatJoker to Ubuntu [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Comprehensive guide to safely browse the SilkRoad

Summary
I) INTRODUCTION
II) SOFTWARES & LINKS
III) ENCRYPTION USING TRUECRYPT
IV) CREATION OF A VIRTUAL MACHINE USING VBOX
V) TWEAKS TO VBOX
VI) INSTALLING AND SETTING UP LINUX
VII) INSTALLING TOR
VIII) SHORT INTRODUCTION TO PGP VIA TERMINAL
IX) ADDITIONAL THOUGHTS
I) INTRODUCTION
First of all, I'm no security expert. The following guide will be nothing but technical instructions to securing your machine to make digital information storage and transmission secure.
Your security is divided in 3 parts. Also remember your security (as in lowering chances to get caught) is only as strong and your weakest link. Those 3 parts are :
a) Money
You can (and will) get caught if you aren't careful with how you move money. Banks and LE work hand-in-hand to trace money. I won't cover that aspect but you need a bulletproof way of buying (if you are a buyer) and/or selling (if you are a seller) your bitcoins.
b) Drugs
Yes, you'll get caught if you don't handle drugs in a secure fashion, ldo. It includes shipping, stealthing, receiving packages, storing. You get the idea.
c) Information
Here is the part I'll develop in this guide. How to handle information (mostly digital information) to not get caught and be as stealthy as possible.
II) SOFTWARES USED AND LINKS
All the following softwares are :
1) Free - you don't have (and shouldn't, as sad as it sounds for security reasons) to pay anything to fully use them
2) Open source - Anyone with knowledge can see what the programs are made of. Def a security plus.
We will need (In order of use) :
a) a good anti-virus
Before even starting the job, we need to make sure we're working in a safe environnement. If you have a keylogger installed on your computer then all futur steps will be for NOTHING. So if you don't have an updated AV installed yet, get one. I personally use AVG. Here is the link but it's recommended you search it yourself using google, after all, I could be a hacker myself.
http://free.avg.com/
b) a password manager
You'll need to save at least 5 complex passwords. I strongly recommend using a password manager (with passwords creation) such as KeePass. It's multi plateform (windows/linux/android).
http://keepass.info/
c) TrueCrypt
Very powerful piece of software which allows you to encrypt files/folder or even full system partition using bulletproof algorythm such as AES.
http://www.truecrypt.org/
d) VirtualBox
Very powerful software which allows you to run a completely autonom virtual machine inside your physical machine.
https://www.virtualbox.org
e) Ubuntu 13.04
Free OS. Very safe. Not so user friendly but you'll only use it to browse SilkRoad and use PGP (more on that later).
http://www.ubuntu.com/
d) Tor Browser Bundle (TBB)
A package of pre-configured software to use TOR. Awesome.
https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en
III) ENCRYPTION USING TRUECRYPT
I assume you already installed the antivirus and ran a minutious scan on your system. Your system was clean already ? Great, you can read what's next.
So first, we want to create an encrypted folder so that we can install a complete different OS in it. It'll be 100% safe and impossible (without the passphrase ldo) to know what it is you are putting in the folder.
a) Click on "Create Volume"
b) Select "Create an encrypted file container"
c) Select "Standard TrueCrypt volume"
note : Do your research on which option you want to use.
d) For Volume Location, select where you want to save the file. Type in a random name and click "save" then "Next" !! Note : You can select a USB pendrive (with at least 10GB and USB 3.0 strongly recommended) so that you have a portable, encrypted OS. Very useful since that you can physically hide it from LE in case of a search at your place) !!
e) Encryption Options
I advise to use AES. The technology is old which, in security, is a good thing since it means it has been tested by many security experts. I don't know about Hash Algorithm. I think I use RIPEMD-160 but it's up to you to do your godamn research on which option you want to use.
f) Volume Size
Pick at least 10gb, (no more than 15GB really). Note : TrueCrypt will encrypt the whole 10GB no matter what it is you put in, even empty space. So consider the number you type in (10GB here) as gone once you click "Next".
g) Volume Password
Open KeePass (!!!!!!!! with a strong masterpassword !!!!!!!!) and generate a random passphrase using at least 15 (25+ advised) characters (with lowercase, uppercase, numbers, symbols, space everything checked). Save it carefully, and copy paste it twice in TryeCrypt.
h) Large Files
Select "Yes"
i) Volume Format
Move your mouse randomly (to create randomness in the Key) a few seconds then click "Format", wait.
Congratulation, you now are the owner of an encrypted file container.
IV) CREATION OF A VIRTUAL MACHINE USING VIRTUALBOX
First, you need to mount the encrypted folder you just created. For this, open TrueCrypt, and click on random letter (remember it and always use the same to avoid corruption). I personally use R: (don't ask me why, I guess I used it the first time and it stuck). Then, click on "Select File" and browse to your newly created folder, click on "Open". Then, click on "Mount", it'll ask for your passphrase. Open it with KeePass and copy past it. Click "OK". If everything went well, you can know access your encrypted folder using Windows Explorer in computer. Truecrypt created a virtual partition.
Okay, so now, off to creating a Virtual Machine. You must have downloaded Ubuntu 13.04 (700MO or so). Good, save the .iso file somwhere.
a) Open VirtualBox, click on "New". In name, type in Ubuntu, it'll automatically select the type and version needed. Click "Next".
b) Memory Size. It's the amount of RAM you want to allocate to your virtual machine. I personally have 12GB of RAM and I allocated 4096MO to my VM (virtual machine). Note : Consider that the amount of RAM you give to your VM gone from your physical machine. Even if you don't run anything on your VM, the amount given (4096MO) won't be usable by your physical machine until you shutdown your VM. Click "Next".
c) Hard-Drive. Select "Create a virtual hard drive now", click "Create".
d) Type of hard drive file Select "VDI (Image disk VirtualBox)" Click "Next".
e) Select "Fixed Size", click "Next".
f) File location and size For location, click the yellow folder and go to the letter you mounted the file in TrueCrypt (for me R:\the-name-of-your-VM.vdi) In size, pick whatever the amount of GB you allocated to the crypted folder MINUS 1.5GB. !! Note : very important. For exemple, if your crypted folder is 10GB, you must pick 8,50 Gio. !! Click "Create" and wait a minute or two for VBox to create your VM.
V) TWEAKS TO VBOX
Here are the settings I use for my SilkRoad Machine.
To access settings, in VirtualBox, select your newly created VM and click "Configuration". Go to the onglet "System" => "Proc", select a reasonnable Value (where the green and red meets is generally ok). Type in 90% in allocated ressources. Go to the onglet "Display" => "Video", select a reasonnable Value (where the green and red meets is generally ok). Number of screen, 1 by default. You can use more screens if you have more than one. Vbox supports it beautifully. Click "OK".
VI) INSTALLING AND SETTING UP LINUX
a) Open VBox, select your virtual machine in the left and click "Start" at the top. You now are running your virtual machine.
Now you must install Linux on it. A window will pop up and ask you to select a booting disk. Click the yellow folder and browse to the Ubuntu.iso file you previously downloaded. Click on "Start".
You VM will now boot using Ubuntu. Install it, check "Download updated while installing", leave everything else as is.
Select "Erase disk and install Ubuntu". File in the settings needed. In name, type whatever you want (note : I usually just type in the same letter I used to mount the folder with TrueCrypt). Pick a password (a new fresh password, that one isn't necessarily important but make sure you remember it). Select "Require my password to log in", you don't mind extra lawyers of security. Click "Continue". Now, wait, the installation can take up to an hour or two.
When done, click on "Restart Now". When rebooting, you will be asked to if you want to boot using the installation, DON'T anything and wait. Now you have a beautiful orange/purple page asking you for your password. Type in the password you wrote during the installation process and press Enter. Welcome to Ubuntu.
b) You need to setup a few things.
First, you can go fullscreen pressing Right CTRL + F (the CTRL next to the arrows on the right of your keyboard). Better, right ?
You'll notice those black borders onto the sides. That's ugly and bad for your eyes. To remediate, you need to install a pack of drivers especially made for Virtual machines.
To do so, put your cursor to the very bottom center of your screen (if you are in fullscreen mode, else you have access to the options at the very top of the window). Click on "Peripheric", Click on "Install Guest Additions". An autorun window will open up, select "Run Software" and click "OK". Enter your Ubuntu password. Click "Authenticate". An ugly purple window will open with ugly white characters, it's the terminal. We'll use it later for different stuff. Wait a minute or two until you have the terminal says this "Press Return to close this window...". Press Return on your keyboard (above Enter) to close the window, ldo.
Reboot the virtual machine by going to the very top right of your screen. Now to go the options, on the left, you'll see a dock of icons, click the Gear with the Red hammer or whatever you call it in english (I know it's not a hammer). Double click on "Displays", pick your favorite resolution. Click "Apply" then "Keep that resolution". Much better, cierto ?
You will notice the OS seems slow and laggy, even more so if you installed your VM on a USB pendrive. To remediate, follow those steps.
Run the terminal (push ALT + F2 and type in "Terminal", double click to open it. Copy past that command :
/uslib/nux/unity_support_test -p
The following should appear :
Not software rendered: no
Not blacklisted: yes
GLX fbconfig: yes
GLX texture from pixmap: yes
GL npot or rect textures: yes
GL vertex program: yes
GL fragment program: yes
GL vertex buffer object: yes
GL framebuffer object: yes
GL version is 1.4+: yes
Unity 3D supported: no
As you can see, 3D acceleration isn't activated. To activate it, return to terminal and copy past that command, enter password when asked. When "asked to continue [Y/n] ?", type in Y then press enter.
sudo bash -c 'echo vboxvideo >> /etc/modules'
Shutdown the virtual machine (you can do it manually inside the VM or press Right CTRL + Q and select "Send extinction signal".
Go back to VirtualBox and go to configuration => display. Check Activate 3D acceleration.
Boot your VM, open terminal and type
/uslib/nux/unity_support_test -p
You should now see that Unity 3D is supported and your OS is fluid. Don't expect native performances tho, it's still an emulated OS.
VII) INSTALLING TOR
Run your VM. Open a firefox window and go to https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en
Select the Linux version and download it. Close Firefox. We want to use that machine on the clearweb as little as possible.
Unpack (or drag&drop) the tor-browser_en-US folder in the folder "Home" or desktop or whervere you want.
Open the folder and double click on "start-tor-browser". It will open a weird text editor with gibberish stuff in it. Close it. We need to activate an option first.
Push ALT, in that window, type "dconf-editor" and press Enter. In dconfg-editor go to: org => gnome => nautilus =>preferences Click on "executable-text-activation" and from drop down menu select: "launch: to launch scripts as programs." Close dconf-editor.
You can now launch TOR. and browse anonymously the road. I strongly advise you to install KeePass for linux by going to Ubuntu Software Center to save passwords for Silkroad as well as your PGP passphrase.
VIII) SHORT INTRODUCTION TO PGP VIA THE LINUX TERMINAL
PGP is a powerful protocal that allows you to encrypt and decrypt messages and files. It has been used for over 15 years and is the standard all over the world for industry and governement communications.
So first, we must create our own set of keys.
A) Creating your own keys
To do so, open the terminal and type GPG. It will reply :
gpg: Go ahead and type your message ...
Ok, you've got GPG installed already, perfect.
To create your key, type :
gpg --gen-key
Type 1 then hit Enter
You'll be asked to chose between 1024 and 4096 bits. Chose 4096 (the most secure), hit Enter.
Next window, type 0, press Enter, then type Y, press Enter.
You are now asked to enter your name, it's important you don't type in your Real Name obviously but it's also important to chose something that identifies you. I chose my Silkroad name so that my contacts know the key is mine.
Email adress : [email protected] or whatever you want, shouldn't be real.
Comment : none, press Enter
Type in "O" to confirm, press Enter
Enter passphrase, very important to chose something very secure. As usual, open up KeePass and generate a strong passphrase, there is no limitation AFAIK.
Then you'll be asked to do random stuff on your computer to generate bytes to ensure randomness in your key pool. Do stuff, open a random file and type in stuff for exemple. Once it's done (it can take a few minutes), you now have your own set of keys.
What we want to do know is to export the public key so that you can share it with your sellers/buyers.
Type :
gpg --armor --export your-email-adress-used-before
Copy paste the public key in a .txt file on your desktop and share it whenever you buy/sell.
B) Importing a public key
To send a message to someone, you must important its key. To do so, create a document and copy paste the key there, close & save it.
Now, open seahorse (hit ALT and type in Seahorse, open the program called "Passwords and keys".
Put your cursor in the very top left of your screen and click file => import, select the file you saved the key in. Done.
C) Encrypting a message
Open the terminal and type :
gpg -ear name-or-email-of-your-contact < Press Enter Type your message
Press Enter, finish by typing "end" and press Enter again.
You'll have your encrypted message. Something that looks like that :
-----BEGIN PGP MESSAGE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)
hQIMA7eD31/5BBRZAQ/9Hq1r1gpOIf2r06zSIL8Ww0tUCC9PlNiMpemPwhpZsccB vO4MOMrnV41BHToTQNfh0xiZdXFxO/T6ow4oatP2Ap/BvZtipcAAjJKowP6aaTOJ Wgd7nC4FTJvRUjgkW/p3imlQsdTVb3+2dNzCPp0yrr8NocW77+4Ka/+4aoql0UmI 3mKLjo0+eof8qAnQd5jOaAcWTszhIwBd99rXVbRCjNa/jMsSQ9Vnn7L+WqYGHuAI MMdOCU3peifV/7zA6A0bMKzStWc1JIa84wus91/mmErkRcNZHqThCje8eulinzRm RthaH0yi7ty65F3IuSqbq/qdpdE9UXvwjySbFE7ANCPpnkP4jv+oL95UezyjbO2x ra1Il7XKbYvaf0oXJAz5xKsLfeHKB3kCR+Kxzt9NmdRZ4rPZ4ZjSN5WI9YeOL0t/ W7oaCyBcFD/6/m/63VNYZTrwrqBGqsWhXVFpoHalvd+09CffsdQjwDIMy9u3TtRk j+FDSGuukKrS/7exWSoajSDhTK+koSS8CIFvyocZ81EkGhnUjd4kxlIAu4UCXmG6 LiJXXo7X5PK7knGtlzZXstrtrrttr8FFeAbSHsZ0+ihdxtNSvx1EPewl TtLSKoUT9ickUrxFoPm2z1vqBwN/087EaCU6BSX8uwZ8GrxMwSKgVmQKfVyfgMDS RAGGtmuRwgfyhthrertwF0KV8nTajDnSqoGiMAgK7y+e320OEFnYXOKIXlue l7FvOHwi9jZbBAR4HHAfhgJIj78P =OT60 -----END PGP MESSAGE-----
You can now send the encrypted message to your contact.
D) Decrypting messages
Open the terminal and type :
gpg -da < Press enter, then copy paste the message you received. Press Enter, finish by tiping end then press Enter again.
You will be asked to enter the passphrase to decrypt it. Open KeePass and copy paste it. The result will be like this :
You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for user: "abcd [email protected]" 4096-bit RSA key, ID xx, created 2013-05-08 (main key ID xxx)
gpg: encrypted with 4096-bit RSA key, ID xxx, created 2013-05-08 "abcd [email protected]" ENCRYPTED MESSAGE TO THE SILK ROAD HERE
You can now safely converse with your vendors.
IX) ADDITIONAL THOUGHTS
I hope everything worked well. Finally, the most important security advice someone can give is to use your brain. Don't do anything stupid and you should be fine.
Feel free to discuss issues you may have encontered here or by PM, I'll gladly help you getting setup.
Remember also that your security is only as good as your contacts security. For exemple, if your seller is stupid and keeps detailed informations of his buyers on file, then there isn't much you can do in case he gets caught.
I could have sold this tutorial but I chose not to because my personnal security is guaranteed only if yours is aswell. You get my point.
MUST BE ANONYMOUS
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux)
mQENBFGIAIUBCAC75V2SJ50dU6+gUY7jdrHxJKmdjXjlOxWjE+CTuti+Pq8NveTK aPXWHmFZpsEtW+v7tHmPPT/cjEKlmo/B9Wxl9daFis+6gFQHnaKNRCFVmOSt9GL8 7qBxrxC/HZTeBgdE8dWf4RPSc911PRb2+iCCrdgj+5ILwp3fcM5EHoRqKiFDpb3A fybrw3prvpPx8dyt1H/p73S6Gfk+Iuwcq2+iIAMJUJQUc+CwMFFCplQ1BUeiD+nn 5o24FXF9Krcbw8w5lZCfPVPSh0GYTvNMaj1VWjEQFU4j0rCOiJ+UVckpgJ4MRrxI MbKJ8srGLSJRnCHM2syQC0Zq/2iwRuZY7zWXABEBAAG0EVdoYXRzdXA1NiA8YUBi LmM+iQE4BBMBAgAiBQJRiACFAhsDBgsJCAcDAgYVCAIJCgsEFgIDAQIeAQIXgAAK CRBioWhoc3JRsCrhB/9M2AptCTjyitpQR1ZnqwFop/NDdOIY1DtERkyQKfbHftzK 5I/LI3wxP5rhts2NY/EMVl8ziJVZ7h0J9japkoia8uOYX9Un6aMasHM0PH7Mln2K 936BeoZDQbPQV8NOCyNT4lMNt7Ajd+6GJcmAIduPmUi6xjgge716MhQlTBg5HG 94ZJT3Xm7W9tuIiJh8H9Dkr60F9UuwtIPfKPEeXyxUI25fZAQ+nyVz39ap2fjyeW EYMB6y90zxWjFPiFfpx+BfcWOmzHaXkps/bG6kSbOcVn9UJS32C0JyIFmfa96N6H +tSmk+WW98u5dSBzhIoYYiXxWPihJDOjTCUYkFC9uQENBFGIAIUBCADrkKs31LOL 4MQ6fdzhw2MvTI8zDad2bJZCd/+Gf8yGTNKhagJIHo8KEuCDINydQXHCt+aNKZZ7 d/QG09nABaybZJfqf1ffOiD5L1PivcKJMdJNozNuIhWxc4E35A7c/wCPJdDOBV0v eqf57illUo+yz7CKfyO088BYMGTrBRi/ifqmPyMuYzzC4SZcx1MJFU1mzONYU1r0 ZYj0eeKdRrbHPfJUAWQUr6MteMvJp5g8JfyYC+Th+zASEYRRfs3I52rsLb1hpxoi 87xUK89xoXdg4uLysz1Iy/PhGjmtbi61sZCv1oh+o9biNsy9zIjqwhCW7oMPwmJ6 Szh2nNTMCuNFABEBAAGJAR8EGAECAAkFAlGIAIUCGwwACgkQYqFoaHNyUbBKWAf5 AbYVbQVRNYVw5pR6+NDLw1qxlafGz/7j6YnApif0vuVzBEE9aFOUdxfKyIy+Ka8l NYjoAItym2mDTsRZqJwEm1FPbmVFu7WPAnnmn1ECyHBSV0vnJjCL5qkoMx9d/EHs WBW7htnRVtbuJEzVZzzSfddjWEYXGqYcqocebBwQpNgdfuQrHadAbkSmDwLfz+KD r17m1i9sUej8hiFLr64XGau7nl2l+iRMR2vTcVpNZDTJa/t4JlrwMINR95ORo3ze bRVKbedZIn3ifeSzyWDTsScvkNVAe4dovATaHWU/+tkNgL4ECI1UNS8XYsGqWe+r pbfj19eRRPAc4lbNfLlUKQ== =aq6t -----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
edit : Fixed a few typos.Reorganized chapters using roman letters.
submitted by MUST-BE-ANONYMOUS to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

How to Bitcoin Miner with Ubuntu VPS server 2018 Linux Tutorial  How to mine Bitcoin/Litecoin using Ubuntu 14.04 CPU How to mine Bitcoin with Linux to get 0.01 BTC How to mine Bitcoin Using Linux [2019] 7. Upgrading Bitcoin Core

Bitcoin Mining For Ubuntu – This guide describes the steps you need to take to install a miner on Linux, in particular, Ubuntu. It is intended to install AMD SDK version 2.1 or 2.4. All commands are entered into the console. Using the terminal window or SSH connections, the following commands are executed: Ubuntu also comes with its firewall disabled by default, but if you have enabled it, see the Ubuntu wiki page for information about adding port forwarding rules. Once you have allowed inbound connections to port 8333, start Bitcoin Core (if you haven’t already) and follow the Testing Connections instructions to test your connection. Connect to the mining computer using SSH using a Linux or Mac system. To connect to your mining computer using SSH, open up a terminal and type in: ssh IP_address_of_mining_computer. For example I would use: ssh 192.168.1.71. It should then ask you to login (using your username and password that you setup in the installation of the Linux OS) How to Mine Bitcoins with BFG Miner on Ubuntu? Introduction. Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency which is quite popular among many investors, tech enthusiasts, and some digital sellers/buyers due to its flexible, anonymous and robust nature. However, unlike other monetary currencies, bitcoins can be mined on the fly with the help of a computer system which makes use of a specialized software The PPA is designed for Ubuntu, but it works great with Debian too. Before you begin with either install, make sure that you have the latest graphics drivers for your card with OpenCL support. That could be the proprietary NVIDIA drivers, the open source AMD drivers, or the AMDGPU-PRO drivers on Ubuntu.

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How to Bitcoin Miner with Ubuntu VPS server 2018

# apt-get update # apt-get install libcurl4-openssl-dev git build-essential ... Bitcoin Mining on Ubuntu 18.10 - Bitcoin Mining Software 2019 - Duration: 24:00. Bitcoin Mining Software 2019 7,885 ... sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind Linux terminal new stuff: clear, ll, cd, touch, echo, cat, shutdown www.bitcoinhackers.org How to mine Bitcoin/Litecoin using Ubuntu 14.04 In this video I show you how to mine bitcoin and litecoin while using ubuntu 14.04 please if you have any questions or concerns feel free to comment ... Tutorial: How to mine with nvidia-gpus in ubuntu? Dependencies: sudo apt-get -y install gcc g++ build-essential automake linux-headers-$(uname -r) git gawk libcurl4-openssl-dev libjansson-dev xorg ... How to Setup CGMiner for Ubuntu (Gridseed Support ... 18:56. Crypto Mining Farm at Apartment January 2020 Update - Duration: 10:07. The Life of a ... How to start Bitcoin mining for ...

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