Volatility estimation for Bitcoin: A comparison of GARCH

Pledgecamp

Pledgecamp
Greetings to you, dear readers. I am always glad to share with you the most promising ideas and start-ups from the world of crypto-currencies. They are created in order to facilitate our life with you and to change the world in the future

https://preview.redd.it/sken0ungsoe21.png?width=1356&format=png&auto=webp&s=281c2a8e6b0afa0297a05157cd9aa3534707231e

Presentation

The real essence of blockchain and cryptocurrency is to distribute decision-making powers from central authorities and big powerhouses through decentralization. One of the more interesting features of cryptocurrency is that it can’t be controlled by any middlemen or authorities. On platforms like Bitcoin network where the framework is peer to peer, the transfer of real value does not require the contribution of any central power, since exchanges are approved by a distributed set of miners that exist on the system. Sadly the concept of decentralization which exists as the basis of cryptocurrency has not been completely adopted in cryptocurrency exchanges. Majority of popular exchanges with massive trading volumes are designed on centralized framework rather than on decentralized framework.
The innovation for future with high quality and make comfortable for all contributor and give the best of services in platform , make the best of controlling on decentralized network for make stabling of all condition ecosystem on platform to make as well and make this platform has a big community for support and make more interaction and transaction so that make this platform growing in future and then value this platform growing in future, building the best of platform with high on services and keeping on growing for make innovation with different so this platform make all client comfortable to use and with high on secure for controlling all condition and providing for all connection platform to make as well so that makes this platform fast growing potential in future.
The first blockchain was conceptualized by an individual (or group of individuals) known as Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008. It was launched the following year in January 2009 by Nakamoto as a core component of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, where it serves as the public ledger for all transactions on the network.
Through the use of a blockchain, Bitcoin became the first digital currency to solve the double spending problem without requiring a trusted authority and has been the inspiration for many additional applications.
I believe that in one hundred years, blockchains will be as common and necessary as electricity is today. They will be fundamental pieces of the economy which nearly everyone will interact with on a daily basis. They will be so normal that we will forget they exist.
We should expect that, over the next couple decades, we will see a Cambrian explosion of blockchain applications and organizations much like what happened with the internet over the past few decades or electrification in the early 20th century. If that’s true, it’s worth developing a basic understanding of blockchains, including why they matter and how they work.

OVERVIEW OF THE PROJECT

Pledgecamp brings transparency, accountability, and trust to crowdfunding. With the blockchain enabling a decentralized, collaborative crowd, backers can help any idea, anywhere with the confidence that creators will keep their promises.
Until now crowdfunding has mainly been an act of faith — falling in love with a project, putting some financial skin to it, and hoping it will work out. By marrying crowdfunding with the benefits of blockchain, Pledgecamp provides a solution for that imperfect scenario in 5 ways:
  1. Backer insurance: Backing a project with your hard-earned money shouldn’t leave you helpless from a financial nightmare. With “Backer Insurance”, backers have the power to hold creators to a higher standard and ensure their money is rewarded with good faith. Creators will have skin in the game to set realistic expectations and remain accountable, even after the funding period is over.
  2. Campaign deposits: Before backing a project, you should know exactly what you’re getting into and who you’re jumping into it with. Campaign deposits force creators to put money where their mouths are, and rewards them for providing material disclosures that foster transparency to better protect your money.
  3. Incentivizing collaboration: We believe the crowd has much more to offer than just their money and should be rewarded for bringing their skills and connections to the equation. “Pledge Coins” enable automated, blockchain-based payments where users can help the platform grow at the same time as earning tokens themselves.
  4. Decentralization: Crowdfunding is at its heart a decentralized system, but currently, it is burdened by centralized parties whose bottom lines consist of generating listing fees regardless of the ultimate success of the companies. Combining crowdfunding with the decentralized nature of the blockchain will allow users to participate in and shape the network according to their needs and priorities, and scale without centralized constraints.
  5. Industry experience: As experienced crowdfunders ourselves and among the top 1% most-funded teams on Kickstarter after four successful projects, we know what tools work and which are missing from the current solutions. We will supply the tools and the marketplace the services and information creators need to succeed. For pros and first-timers alike, data-driven Automation, Advanced E-commerce, Analytics, and Data Management integrations will help creators build and optimize their campaigns.
The Pledgecamp market network combines properties of a marketplace where buyers and sellers of services are brought together, with a network where individual characteristics, identities, and references matter. This requires sophistication and care on the part of the creator to carefully evaluate which vendors have sufficient expertise to fulfil the task.
On Pledgecamp, a creator will be able to easily connect with various vendors, such as plastic injection moulders and shipping companies, who are on the platform to earn their business. The creator will be able to reliably review each vendor’s reputations and history with past clients in order to compare actual work histories and gauge fit. For an aspiring entrepreneur, finding trustworthy and appropriate partnerships is a critical success factor and huge pain point that can be addressed by a blockchain-powered market network.

What is Pledgecamp’s mission?

We believe those good ideas can come from anywhere, and no one should be denied the opportunity to become an entrepreneur. Our mission is to give everyone that opportunity.

Problem

The main problem facing crowdfunding is an issue of trust. Backers are burned repeatedly by creators who fail to follow through on their promises. A lack of security mechanisms and transparency provides backers with little protection.
Put simply, the current model on these platforms is to give a stranger some money, then pray and hope that you get something back as promised. Instead of taking an active role in providing investor protections, current platforms adopt a more passive role with the apparent aim of avoiding liability. Pledges are considered “donations” in order to distance them from being considered investments or pre-purchases.22 This euphemistic classification ignores the reality of how these platforms are used today. Some failure is a natural consequence of innovation but by ignoring the issue, today’s platforms have allowed the problem to become an epidemic.
Solution: Blockchain Powered Crowdfunding The emergence of blockchain technology and its decentralized nature presents a perfect solution to these longstanding problems in crowdfunding. Smart contracts will add security and transparency to pledging, and financial penalties will keep creators accountable to their promises. In addition, blockchain will empower the “Smart Crowd” to contribute more than just funds but participate in projects with their skills and knowledge in return for income. The distributed nature of the blockchain and the use of cryptocurrencies will allow the network to grow, self-govern, and distribute value in an open and merit-based way—without central intermediaries or borders.
Pledgecamp Ecosystem: The Pledgecamp Ecosystem consists of three major parts: the core Crowdfunding Platform, as well as the Market Network and Knowledge Center. The Pledgecamp Ecosystem is based on a blockchain-powered, peer-driven economy.

https://preview.redd.it/qtqmtsvksoe21.png?width=1019&format=png&auto=webp&s=8584e2201c10544c73a49d54fd2c2f369d3b9886

The Token

Name – Pledge Coin (PLG)
Type – ERC20
Price per PLG – $0.01 USD
Total Supply – 10,000,000,000 PLG
Public Distribution — 2,000,000,000
Remaining for Sale – 300,000,000 PLG
Min. Contribution – $50 USD
Currencies Accepted: ETH, BTC

For More Information Visit:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Pledgecamp Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pledgecamp Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pledgecamp/ Telegram: https://t.me/pledgecamp Medium: https://medium.com/pledgecamp

Bounty0x username: @walesodiya

submitted by walesodiya to Pledgecamp_Official [link] [comments]

A Class by Itself

A Class by Itself: Based on this lecture and the book “Zero to One, ” by Peter Thiel
Rock, paper, scissors. Innovation beats competition. Why? Because a true innovation is an order of magnitude better than what had existed previously. Because an innovation creates something new it can form a monopoly. It is what Peter Thiel describes as going from 0 to 1. By contrast, competition takes something that previously existed and replicates it, seeking perfection, differentiating only through minor variation. Competition is psychologically unhealthy and detrimental to value creation. Competition is going from 1 to N.
Bitcoin was an innovation. It was a 0 to 1, order of magnitude improvement, that really created something new. At the genesis of the Bitcoin block-chain in 2009 it had a monopoly of the crypto-currency market. It was in a class by itself where it could dominate. People that recognized that early were able to make a lot of money. Yay!
Developing Ethereum from the proven concepts of Bitcoin was another innovation. It was another 0 to 1, order of magnitude improvement, that really created something new. At the genesis of the Ethereum main-chain in 2015 it had a monopoly on the smart contracting market. It was in a class by itself. It had a several year lead in that specialized market, where it could dominate. People that recognized that early were able to make a lot of money. Yay!
A secret about nature.
We think of losers as those who can’t compete because they are too weak or dim-witted or lazy. But most competitors are losers too. They lose because it’s difficult to differentiate your efforts in a populated field. Because power law distribution is real and present in competence hierarchies, the larger the field of competitors, the more likely you are to shake out nearer the bottom than the top. Certainly you can get better at something through practice, but the larger the group of contenders, the more average your results are likely to appear. Furthermore, the tendency is to take an adversarial stance toward competitors, which leads to a large amount of wasted effort and pointless, destructive emoting. Competition is for losers, especially when you could dominate in a class by yourself.
They say a Jack of all trades is master of none. If this is true, and competing in a crowded field is likely to yield only average results, then one path to success is to specialize in a niche where you can dominate and where there are few competitors. Be like the giant panda. Eat nothing but bamboo. Monopolize that niche. This is a secret about nature.
Amazon became the behemoth it is today in on-line sales by starting with a small niche market where it could dominate, books. Pooled block-chain security and inter-chain communication is a similar small niche market. Amazon innovated by combining computer technology with human action to provide the best service at the lowest cost to achieve a monopoly and in doing so created a 10X improvement over what had existed preciously. The need to initially attract miners and then to coordinate hard forks is a major impediment to innovation in the block-chain space. Rapid deployment and iteration should facilitate quicker evolution of the technologies built on Polkadot.
The crypto space can be divided into many smaller markets. Currency, value storage, trading/exchange, smart contracting, oraclizing, compute, identity services, obfuscation services, gaming and many more that are not mentioned here or have not yet been created. A state machine that is customized to task is likely to be the best solution for many of these markets. The ability to upgrade the state machine and integrate novel state transition functions seamlessly into a network of chains on the fly without a hard fork is a Zero to One innovation in block-chain technology.
Amazon progressively moved outward from book sales, systematically phagocitising and dominating other small markets to out-compete them by creating economies of scale. Because substrate allows for rapid deployment of innovative chains that can upgrade without the need for coordinated hard forks, substrate chains will dominate older tech and phagocitize their markets. On-the-fly upgrades without the need for coordinated hard forks is an order of magnitude, 10X impovement over what has existed previously.
A secret about people.
Secrets about people are secrets that people don’t know about themselves. We can find the secrets people aren’t telling us by asking what is forbidden or taboo. Fanatical zeal over decentralization is a cultural norm in the crypto space. Decentralization is a crypto-meme. Projects viewed as centralized are vociferously attacked on social media. This makes sense for currencies in the meat space. Central(ized) banks invariably dilute the value of the currencies they issue through inflation at the expense of users and especially holders/savers. Because there is no freedom without economic freedom, the complete decentralization of crypto-currencies with fixed, unchangeable inflation rates and uncensorable and immutable transactions makes sense. But is complete decentralization of every crypto application appropriate or even desirable?
Consider smart contracting. The first smart contract that was really successful at raising a lot of capital was the DAO. After raising more than the GDP of some countries, the contract was promptly hacked and the capital was taken resulting in a contentious chain split for Ethereum. The Ethereum Foundation functioned as a centralized authority in this instance to restore the funds to the original contributors at the expense of losing the right to claim that the system was decentralized, completely destroying the original missions’ value proposition of unstoppable applications. The DAO starkly illustrated that complete decentralization is not always desirable, indeed it may not even be possible. This is a secret about people. People need formal governance over the execution of contracts because human interpretation of meaning is variable.
The need for governance over computers shouldn’t be surprising. Computers are great at analyzing large amounts data, but don’t begin to recognize meaning. The human mind has evolved for the abstract nature of our universe. Humans are great at analyzing the abstract, but frequently disagree about meaning. Computers are nothing but tools for humans. Tools need to be controlled to work towards a meaningful purpose.
Computers can be used to search for patterns in enormous volumes of data. We have seen this in the anti-fraud systems deployed by Paypal, and later with the systems developed by Palantir, where computers are used to search for patterns and then humans decipher the meaning in the context of our world. Computers are great for finding odd patterns in enormous piles of data, but a human mind is also required to determine if the odd patterns actually has meaning. Same goes for a block chain. The computer will faithfully and flawlessly execute whatever state transition function they are programmed with, but they can’t judge the morality. Only a human mind can determine if a given transaction is theft, or fair ball, and the humans involved will often disagree on this point.
Polkadot is innovating along along the dimension of governance. Governance systems create a symbiosis between man and machine, similar to Amazon’s fraud detection programs. Empirically, we know that crypto-economic systems tend to fracture along social lines. They fracture along social lines because they are economic systems, and economics is the study of human action. Human behavior can’t just be crossed out of an economic system like some variable in an algebraic equation. Economics doesn’t work like that. Because a crypto-economic network is really only useful when humans interact with it, effective governance systems are necessary to satisfactorily resolves disputes and keep the network cohesive.
Polkadot is at least an order of magnitude improvement over the systems that came before it along multiple dimensions: governance, inter-chain communication, on-the-fly upgrades without co-ordinated hard forks. At the genesis of the Polkadot relay chain in 2019 it will have a monopoly, or near monopoly, along each of these dimensions of innovation. Concurrent innovation along multiple dimensions puts Polkadot in a class by itself. People that recognize this early should be able to make a lot of money. Yay!
submitted by McPheeb to polkadot_market [link] [comments]

Pledgecamp – Review

Pledgecamp – Review


https://preview.redd.it/vzzev7jvroe21.png?width=1356&format=png&auto=webp&s=1abee3de68df2919c79543295b7e993c6f757bf9

Presentation

The essence of blockchain and cryptocurrency is to assign decision-making powers from central authorities and big powerhouses into decentralization. One of the more interesting features of cryptocurrency is that it can’t be compared by any middlemen or authorities. On platforms like Bitcoin network where the framework is peer to peer, the transfer of real value does not require the contribution of any central power, since exchanges are supported by a distributed set of miners that exist on the system. Sadly the concept of decentralization which exists as the basis of cryptocurrency has not been completely seized in cryptocurrency exchanges. Majority of popular exchanges with massive trading volumes are originated on centralized framework rather than on decentralized framework.

OVERVIEW OF THE PROJECT
Pledgecamp brings transparency, liability, and trust to crowdfunding. With the blockchain enabling a decentralized, collaborative crowd, backers can help any idea, anywhere with the heart that creators will keep their promises.
Until now crowdfunding has mainly been an act of faith — falling in love with a project, putting some financial skin to it, and hoping it will work out. By marrying crowdfunding with the benefits of blockchain, Pledgecamp provides a solution for that imperfect scenario in 5 ways:
  1. Backer insurance:Backing a project with your hard-earned money shouldn’t leave you helpless from a commercial nightmare. With “Backer Insurance”, backers have the power to hold creators to a higher figure and ensure their money is rewarded with good faith. Creators will have skin in the game to set realistic expectations and remain accountable, even after the funding period is over.
  2. Campaign deposits: Before backing a project, you should know precisely what you’re getting into and who you’re jumping into it with. Campaign deposits force producers to put money where their mouths are, and rewards them for providing material disclosures that foster transparency to better protect your money.
  3. Incentivizing collaboration:We believe the crowd has much more to offer than just their money and should be rewarded for bringing their skills and connections to the equation. “Pledge Coins” enable automated, blockchain-based fees where users can help the platform grow at the same time as earning tokens themselves.
  4. Decentralization:Crowdfunding is at its heart a decentralized system, but currently, it is burdened by centralized parties whose bottom lines consist of generating listing fees regardless of the ultimate benefit of the companies. Combining crowdfunding with the decentralized nature of the blockchain will allow users to participate in and shape the network according to their needs and priorities, and scale without centralized constraints.
  5. Industry experience:As experienced crowdfunders ourselves and between the top 1% most-funded teams on Kickstarter after four successful projects, we know what tools work and which are missing from the current solutions. We will supply the tools and the marketplace the services and knowledge creators need to succeed. For pros and first-timers alike, data-driven Automation, Advanced E-commerce, Analytics, and Data Management integrations will help creators build and optimize their campaigns.
The Pledgecamp market network combines properties of a marketplace where buyers and sellers of services are brought together, with a network where individual characteristics, identities, and references matter. This wants sophistication and care on the part of the creator to carefully evaluate which vendors have sufficient expertise to fulfil the task.
On Pledgecamp, a creator will be able to easily connect with various merchants, such as plastic injection moulders and shipping companies, who are on the platform to earn their business. The creator will be able to reliably review each vendor’s reputations and history with past patients in order to compare actual work histories and gauge fit. For an aspiring entrepreneur, finding accurate and appropriate partnerships is a critical success factor and huge pain point that can be approached by a blockchain-powered market network.

Problem
The main obstacle facing crowdfunding is an issue of trust. Backers are burned repeatedly by creators who fail to follow through on their promises. A lack of protection mechanisms and transparency provides backers with little protection.
Put simply, the current model on these platforms is to give a stranger any money, then pray and hope that you get something back as guaranteed. Instead of taking an active role in providing investor protections, current platforms adopt a more passive role with the apparent aim of avoiding liability.Pledges are considered “donations” in order to distance them from being considered investments or pre-purchases.22 This euphemistic classification ignores the reality of how these platforms are used today. Some failure is a natural consequence of innovation simply by ignoring the issue, today’s platforms have allowed the problem to become an epidemic.
Solution: Blockchain Powered CrowdfundingThe emergence of blockchain technology and its decentralized nature presents a perfect explication to these longstanding problems in crowdfunding. Smart contracts will add security and transparency to pledging, and financial fines will keep creators accountable to their promises. In addition, blockchain will empower the “Smart Crowd” to contribute more than just funds but participate in projects with their skills and knowledge in return for income. The distributed nature of the blockchain and the use of cryptocurrencies will allow the network to grow, self-govern, and distribute value in an open and merit-based way—without convenient intermediaries or borders.

The Token

Name – Pledge Coin (PLG)
Type – ERC20
Price per PLG – $0.01 USD
Total Supply – 10,000,000,000 PLG
Public Distribution — 2,000,000,000
Remaining for Sale – 300,000,000 PLG
Min. Contribution – $50 USD
Currencies Accepted: ETH, BTCToken Allocation

Meet The Amazing Team:

https://preview.redd.it/cxezg5v0soe21.png?width=1063&format=png&auto=webp&s=3aa6f9a2b685c4bb898a9098cd76809becba6a57
Advisors:

https://preview.redd.it/4zlzvw12soe21.png?width=1053&format=png&auto=webp&s=09382fce355993933cafadb3510617c2d4b11609
For More Information Visit:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/PledgecampFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/pledgecampInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/pledgecamp/Telegram: https://t.me/pledgecampMedium: https://medium.com/pledgecamp

Bounty0x username: @walesodiya

submitted by walesodiya to cryptotomtom [link] [comments]

After ICON the next and only ICO, Don Tapscott is an advisor for, Jibrel Network - Why I think its the sleeping giant and why you should have a look at this project. Thoughts below.

Jibrel Network Settle in boys, this is a long one. I am about to tell you about one of the most promising projects/ICOs of this year, the Jibrel Network.
What does it do? Essentially, the Jibrel Network provides currencies, equities, commodities and other financial assets and instruments as ERC-20 tokens and puts them on the blockchain. It does that to provide incomparable liquidity and decrease friction costs. Additionally, it automates certain processes such as dividend distribution and so on.
The Jibrel Network has a native token, known as JNT, which will be used as the ‘liquid’ underlying asset of the Jibrel AG fund’s portfolio. Additionally, it is a deflationary currency because every time JNT is used as jGas (transfer of ownership; purchase of tokenized assets) it is burned.
>Wait, I’ve heard this before, with LAtoken and Veratesium, this is a tried and tested scam.
Previous attempts at the market didn't have what Jibrel have – smart regulation and insured 2-way (i.e. physical asset to tokens, tokens to physical assets liquidity). All financial assets will be tokenized as programmable CryDRs, which would entail no regulatory or legal risks whatsoever. And, why does this make it better than all the others? Due to the Know Your Customer (KYC) and Anti-Money Laundering (AML) regulations involved in trading real-world assets, there also exists an investor registry that only allows for certain CryDRs to be traded amongst addresses that have been verified by Jibrel. Meaning that, for example, only brokers and fund managers can interact in certain ways with the network. In the traditional economy, regulation is placed around certain asset classes to manage fraud, market, credit and systemic risk. Currencies, commodities and securities all have different regulations across different jurisdictions. The Jibrel Network team has worked (and continues to work) tirelessly with their regulatory advisors to translate real-world regulation into smart regulation (Solidity code). These things will update in near real time as regulation laws and rules amend, so will the smart contract.
>Pfft, where’s the proof?
Well they’re bringing out a MVP usable by any type of user. jWallet and jCash (or jFiat)! Any supposed Tether scams are now dead in the water as we have real, audited tokenized fiat currency. In 6 different forms, no less! Who audits this? The Swiss offices of PricewaterhouseCoopers (doing business under the brand PwC), one of the Big 4 auditing/accounting firms. They will check Jibrel’s position of financial performance and position, cash flows, and other subtle aspects of their financial activities. PwC audits will be public and sufficiently frequent (most likely biannual). The actual code itself? Already been audited by New Alchemy – leaders in smart contract auditing, so that’s all functional.1
jCash is simple enough, It’s Tether but legitimate and in 6 different currencies right off the bat. jUSD, jEUR, jCNY, jAED, jRUB and jGBP. Any fiat currency can be implemented (as long as there is enough demand to implement it). Additionally, Jibrel will always be able to cover their liabilities due to the 3-4x assets in excess of liabilities. Not only that, but the Jibrel DAO (when it activates) will self-regulate the fund through different rules and scenarios encoded in the smart contract – a completely decentralised, on-chain bank.
The real work of art, jWallet The jWallet does all the transaction signing, all the key storage, etc. locally - you never have to share your private keys, they never leave your browser. You can even store them in the browser cache.
It doesn't make sense to share your keys with a service (you login with email) - there are no benefits to that. It’s strange to store large sums of money in a Chrome extension.
https://techcrunch.com/2017/11/22/with-ethereum-wallets-under-constant-attack-jibrel-network-decided-to-build-their-own/
But wait, there's more, when it is up and going, The Jibrel DAO will act as an artificial trading curb, meaning that if the price sinks too low too fast, the DAO will kick in and buy up any oversold JNT, which would equate to roughly 50%. Same thing if it rises too quickly, obvs whale pnd, its curbing it! But there’s only one real downside to that.. unfortunately, this won’t be implemented for quite a while. Target is Q4 2018 for DAO being implemented and a few months (could be up to 6 months) after to be really kicked into gear. Why waiting so long after implementation? Well that’s because DAO needs to build up a buffer to be safe during it’s operation, Jibrel devs are smart and they know DAO cannot be fully operational right off the bat without any serious precautions.
>That sounds great, I’ll wait until after ICO when it dumps ;)
No mate, not with this buying pressure. Jibrel is very investor focused (see partnerships) and will be listing itself on as many exchanges as possible, with two exchanges being in the top 5 in volume (The CEO,Yazan won't say which, most likely HitBTC and a mystery second). Additionally, new jCash will be rolled out all the time, every new currency would be a new audience that’s getting exposed to this company as stated above.
But ultimately you don’t have to invest, they can do it with or without you. This is for banks and other financial institutions. With the infrastructure Jibrel is implementing, banks can save up to 25 billion dollars a year. .
Banks will be able to interact with their own digital assets, completely free of all the legal hassle they had before, while still being perfectly above board. It’s also recession proof. Any trader convinced that another GFC is coming doesn’t have to be purely cash anymore. Its protected by reducing systemic risk in its ecosystem, (through separation, Close monitoring, regulation and risk assessment being the Basel III regulatory framework). Again don’t worry, this is all covered in its smart regulation.
Also note the ICO is not paired with ETH like many ICO's. 1 ETH = x amount of tokens. Due to volatility of the tokens its ICO is pegged at 0.25 cents offer. So if ETH is high or BTC is high you will get more tokens. This makes much better sense as a token structure and why I believe it hasn't sold out yet, a lot of people are waiting in the sidelines.
Now for the juicy part (in case previous parts weren’t juicy enough for you thirsty kids), the advisors and partnerships:
They have freaking Eddy Zuaiter as an advisor, the ex-COO of Soros fund management chatting with them. The man who oversaw 2.5 billion dollars worth of trade positions joined jibrel because:
  1. He sees Jibrel as an opportunity to learn more about the space
  2. He sees Jibrel as an opportunity to directly be involved, help them be well capitalized, survive the bubble, and grow. He sees the potential to pull off an Amazon (his words).
The second is Don Tapscott, the MVP himself. This man has been throwing the term “digital currency” around since 1995, don’t listen to me prattle on, go watch one of his TED talks.
The Jibrel Network is engaged with New Alchemy for Security Audits and PwC for financial audits. In addition, we have formed a strategic agreement with Arabian Chain to bring smart regulation to MENA markets (Middle east) , as well as TaaS fund to provide smart tokens (CryDRs). Jibrel AG is a registered entity in Zug, Switzerland and is responsible for the development of the network. The Jibrel team have undertaken the necessary legal and compliance measures to ensure a fully compliant token sale. For this reason, certain jurisdictions such as US, Singapore and China will not be allowed to participate in the token sale. ;) ICO is 28 million HARD CAP- Yazan has put extra emphasis on this
Lastly, in case you brush it off as an ethereum network scamcoin? It’s blockchain agnostic. If there’s a new king in town, Jibrel can hop on over to it!
Let us know if you have any further questions https://web.telegram.org/#/[email protected]_network
http://sale.jibrel.network
ICO rating websites :
https://icobench.com/ico/jibrel-network
https://icorating.com/ico/432/
https://www.icoranker.com/jibrel-network/- 98/100
More info:
http://vator.tv/news/2017-12-07-jibrel-network-announces-partnership-with-bitcoin-suisse
https://medium.com/@curiousinvestojibrel-network-enabling-investors-e004c9ca7605
submitted by staskies to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

2019 should be the year that you start your food business... Here's how (Mini-AMA all weekend)

So you love to eat. No kidding! You need to eat to live. So does everyone else. Starting a food business is fun, stressful, and it's a blast when someone you have no clue who they are likes what you made.
You have a burning desire to start a hot sauce / juice / beverage / cookie / baked goods / bitcoin gummy bear company. Basically if someone wants to put it in their mouth, you have an idea for it. So let's get to it. Break it down, from start to finish (lol, it's never done).
WARNING: This may seem as some what self-promoting, but the only thing I will say now is that I started a 3PL shipping company specifically for food items. No links to it, but you can check my post history, but I'll save you the time. I used to be a web / app developer, got tired of the grind with trying to get clients to pay, got tired, bought a food truck with ZERO experience (seriously, my first event I bought 300 loaves of bread. Used 4.5. It was pretty comical and family / friends ate sourdough for WEEKS). I brought the food truck up, had the truck, a pop-up restaurant on Las Vegas Blvd., got an offer to sell the physical truck and book of business, took it, and kept the name rights. Now I'm using my skills both in tech and food to streamline and help foodpreneurs. Take this with whatever grain of salt you want.
Also, to state real quick, DO NOT PM ME QUESTIONS... I am here to open things up so everyone can learn, so the next person looking how to start up a hot sauce company gets relevant information and not "Sent you a PM." I'm gonna be around all weekend, and want to help everyone. I'll try and make responses as detailed / personalized as I can. The more info you post, the more I can help.
Part 1: You have an idea - Great - Treat it like a start-up, because it is
Food can be unsexy. Kitchens are hot, you burn yourself, you get covered in grease, you slip on stainless steel floors (true), and every once in a while theres some knife cuts. BUT, when you know that you just bought a $20 case of potatoes (50 lb) and are selling french fries for $6 for like 3oz of potatoes, your fave words become "Would you like fries with that?"
Key 1 - Know your numbers. Go shopping. You already have your idea, so go shopping. Make a test recipe at home, solely for the purpose of cost analysis. Jump on google sheets, and list EVERY ingredient on your list, and then look at other things, which I call hidden costs.
Visible Costs - Recipe ingredients, packaging, labeling Hidden Costs - How long does it take you to cook / bake / make (labor time), how long do you need to cook it (oven wear and tear, gas, electric for mixer, etc)
You can have a ton of hidden costs beyond just the actual ingredients, and these often get overlooked. If you plan on growing the business, get a friend and your phone and take pictures of HOW YOU WANT IT DONE along each step. Create the "brand" manual for your food / baked good / sauce, etc. Is the hot sauce supposed to be chunky? Is it supposed to be smooth? Are the cookies supposed to be a 30% shade of brown for crispness, and how long did you leave it in the oven for? Those should ALL be documented. You have the time now, and you should be doing it.
Key 2 - Find your suppliers, and find about discounts
You know what you need, and retail might not be the cheapest, or it could be. Play the sales. If you are making a cookie that uses bananas, can you take advantage of price matching at Walmart vs a restaurant supply store to get a better deal and cheaper ingredients? As a smaller company / maker, this should be a good idea, as it will help you create your MVP much cheaper.
Part 2: For the love of everything holy use google to find about your licensing requirements. (I won't do this for you as part of the AMA, just an FYI).
Everyone seems to get tied up with "Can I make this soup / cookie / hot sauce." The short answer is yes, you can, and you can test it legally. It'll take a few dollars, but it's worth it because of the access you can get.
  • Start with your local city or county health department. As you can see from my name, I'm in Vegas. Southern Nevada Health District manages all of the food. They will handle the licensing for food establishments and producers. If you need some Google help, search "[my city] health department]" "[my county] health department]" and if that search returns unfruitful, then search for "[my city] cottage food laws" "cottage food laws [my city / my county]" because small producers will 90% of the time be allowed to create small batches of what are considered "non-hazardous foods" in a home kitchen with little to no oversight. WHAT THIS MEANS: You will most likely be able to bake cookies, cupcakes, make a hot sauce, MAYBE a soup, basically anything that is heated / cooked and can be left out and still be fine. There is almost zero chance your sushi delivery service will be allowed. Fun fact, you cannot serve raw bacon, but under some cottage food laws, cooked bacon is fine because it is turned into a "jerky" classification. So you need to read. I'm not a lawyer, I just like paperwork. Don't be an idiot.
  • Licensing of some sort will be a key part of you starting to get out there. Theres a semi-good chance you can sell on FB, to friends family, at a school bake sale, or even through Etsy / your own online shop without getting any kind of official letter or licensing requirements. SWAT isn't coming because you're selling grandmas cookies on Etsy, so breathe and relax. If you go to a craft show, farmers market, etc, that is when the licensing comes into play, but putting that time and effort / money into it will put you lightyears ahead of everyone else doing it out of their house. Also, fees tend to be pretty low, so you can test your idea from SOMEONE WHO IS EXCHANGING MONEY FOR YOUR GOODS AND DOES NOT CARE ABOUT YOUR FEELINGS. Everyones family / spouse / friends won't really be too keen to tell you "Yo dawg, this is garbage sauce / cupcake / icing / soup" so gathering feedback on what works cheaply before you use student loans on your hot sauce idea is a good thing. Few dollars up front to keep you from doing something dumb.
  • If you are going to go through the trouble of going through licensing to go to a farmers market, etc., then please, child, have a seat and start collecting feedback. Make your product better. It's not hard. "Hey, free half cookie for an email for a survey, and when we launch, we will email you a 30% off coupon." It's not hard, survey money and google forms are free. Mailchimp is free for small accounts. Do the work, otherwise throw your money away at a strip club.
Part 3: Liability and the business
You've now established that grandma wasn't lying to you, and your bacon jerky business is viable, and you're starting to see an increase in orders. Here's what to do next, now that you've "proven the concept" beyond people who will lie to you.
  • Get an LLC / Corp. Use something like Gust Launch, Clerky, or Stripe Atlas. <--- Use google. No links. Time to use your big boy pants. Open a new tab. An LLC / Corp will allow you to set up a business bank account, so when something goes wrong (it will), you can separate your personal life from the business. It's less than $1,000, and worth every penny.
  • Get a business bank account. Credit unions are dope, but big banks work too. Also, cash is fine, but the more credit cards you process, the better. Different schools of thought on this, I just like not having to deal with cash. Some banks charge you a cash handling fee over a certain cash deposit limit (true story). I found a trick to get around this. Go to a check cashing / payday loan place, buy a money order (free usually), then deposit the money order. It's not cash. Just my $.02.
  • BUY BUSINESS INSURANCE.... It's cheap. We paid like $100 a month for $500k in coverage if memory serves me right, and scaled up based on what the client needed through umbrella policies. Our truck insurance for business was like $300 a month on the commercial vehicle. You're dealing with food, and people can get sick. Just do it. When it saves your ass down the road, message me and you can buy me a 2 for $3 Rockstar from 7-11 as a thank you.
  • WTF are you actually selling is a big thing, and regulations will play a pretty big part of this, because it may fall under some OTHER, LARGER authority. There was a post recently for someone who wanted to repackage cheese as part of a cheese of the month box. Bro, FDA and USDA are all over that. There are several agencies I would never want to run afoul of, FBI, IRS, SEC, and FDA. Seriously, you'll get smacked harder than a toddler falling out of a shopping cart if you anger any of those agencies. Use Google. Heres an example. Friend of mine wanted to start a meal prep company, and wanted to do fresh juices. Seems simple because fresh juice places are everywhere right? Not. According to FDA regulations, even for small producers, any part of a "fresh juice" derived from "any part of the fresh vegetable / fruit" was supposed to be handled and cared for according to HCAAP and be pasteurized. Now, fun fact.... Making fresh juice "to order" does not fall under these categories because it would be intended for "immediate consumption." So as long as the meal prep guys made food ahead of time, but only made the juice and bottled it same day, it would fall under these guidelines, and wouldn't be tied to a whole host of regulations and expense. Leave it overnight? Nahh, can't do it. Same day? Totally fine. LEARN TO READ, BECAUSE A SMALL CHANGE COULD SAVE YOU. I've already decided I wouldn't do good in prison, so I don't want to go to jail.
  • You'll need a corporate structure and an EIN most likely for official licenses and for tax reporting. If you're selling online, something like TaxJar is a godsend. You'll need this also if you connect to your POS system to get paid and make that monnnaaayyyyyyy....
  • Something that I've seen brought up here countless times is "well I'm getting busy but my mom / wife / grandma needs to cook in the kitchen," or the good problem to have, "I'm busy with orders because the local news station picked it up and I can't make it fast enough." You're going to want to start investigating what are called "commissary kitchens" or "rentable commercial kitchens" and again, use the googles. [my city / county] commissary kitchens. There are a ton in almost every major city (except Vegas, dunno why). Or search for "kitchens for rent by the hour." You'll get access to larger / better equipment, usually rentable all-in by the hour, so it'll help you plan and budget, because earlier you did all the recipe and timing cards so you know how long it will take (see, I'm not a complete idiot).
Part 4: Launching
HOOOLLLLYYYYYYYYY SHHHHHIIIIIITTTTTTTTTTT..... You're ready to go big time, and are listening to "All I do is win" on repeat on your speakers and standing in your front yard shooting your not-a-flamethrower in the sky. Some things you should start to think about:
  • Branding is big. Have you secured the .com? You need to. There are different schools of thought on if different TLD's are okay. I say no, personally, and I won't pick a name if the .com isn't available. Work on a decent label or branding sticker. Packaging is key as well. For bottles, check out SKS Bottle. For boxes check out U-Line. You might be able to find someone cheaper locally, because shipping is a huge expense of heavy boxes / packaging (supplier to you). Check out StickerMule, Lightning Labels, or google "label suppliers." If you want the non-shiny labels, look for "matte" labels.
  • Social will be major. Not only for being able to launch your own brand, but if you ever decide to go into retail, or distribute. It's common sense in this day and age. I will tell you, that if you have a product that is consumer based, show them how to use it. Hot sauce? Start making recipes and posting them with your hot sauce. Cookies? Show different ways cookies can be given as gifts. Interact with people celebrating things. Pay attention to holidays. Bacon jerky? Go to a NASCAR event, biker rally, take pics, and interact. Give samples away. Go where your target market is.
  • Distribution. Take a listen to "Major Distribution" by 50 Cent. Great hype song. Or Go Getter by Young Jeezy. You're now the Columbians trying to get your hot sauce crack into as many hands as you can. You're selling online, spending hours packaging each bottle with care, printing labels, while you child is crying and your wife is burning rice for the 6th night in a row. Your hands smell like Kraft packaging. Bubble wrap is your defacto blanket....
STOP READING HERE BECAUSE THIS IS SEMI-SELF PROMOTIONAL BECAUSE I AM GIVING TIPS RELATED TO WHAT I DO. LOOK FOR THE NEXT SET OF ALL CAPS TO SKIP THIS ENTIRELY.
A regular distributor will take your product, buy it, and resell it. They may add it to their product catalog, maybe a "hey, Massive Diablo Hot Sauce is a new sauce we are carrying, want to try it?" "Nahhhhh..." "Okay, normal hot sauce it is then." You are the owner of your hot sauce. You're the owner of your packaged cookies. You're the owner of your gluten free, purple yam potato chip. You care the most. You can go the traditional distribution route, and it can happen, but for someone to want to pick you up, you need traction. That's where a food 3PL comes into play (which is a grossly underserved market imho). You pay to rent space in a warehouse, usually by the pallet or half pallet size, pay monthly, and then you pay each order sent out. You need to make sure the numbers work for this.
You're now shipping orders more efficiently, and most likely taking advantage of their shipping discounts because of volume. Straight forward, we plug our own account details into ShipStation for FedEx and get even better rates because of the volume we do. The more you ship, if you have a loading dock, etc. all play into your rates.
Now, you've offloaded the task of shipping to someone else, and are free to focus on sales, growing the business. If you move to a co-packer (more below), your co-packer is sending your stuff to us in bulk, and we are shipping, basically moving you out of the equation almost entirely. You'll need someone who tracks lot numbers, shipment dates, and more in case of a recall, and who got what in an inventory management system (we do, hence the tech background). Temp, shelf life, FIFO, expiration dates, and breakage all are things you need to consider when working with someone.
OKAY YOU CAN KEEP READING NOW THAT YOU'VE SKIPPED THE SELF PROMOTION (KIND OF) PART
  • Co-packers will save your sanity, your relationships, and keep you from smelling like chocolate chips or ghost peppers on date night. Because you've done your starards manual, and updated it based on tweaks, you can start searching for a co-packer. Google the meaning. It's not hard. Don't ask me what a co-packer is. Youre going to want to look at things like capacity, non-disclosure agreements, secrecy, length in business, and packaging capabilities. I know of one place here in Vegas that will do cookies, in different sizes, and will package several different ways. Not everyone will. Look for things like turn around time, lead time, graphics capabilities, and more. I'm sure I'm forgetting something, but if I think of it, see the comments.
Congrats!!!!!!! You've now made the next Tabasco, Auntie Ann's Pretzels, Chips Ahoy, Sriracha, Fresh Squeezed Juice conglomerate. I expect to see all of you on store shelves, and if this helped, send me some food. I'll eat it, or my girlfriend will.
Quesadillas are sandwiches. Fight me. See you in the comments.
submitted by Brianvegas to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

INT - Comparison with Other IoT Projects

What defines a good IoT project? Defining this will help us understand what some of the problems they might struggle with and which projects excel in those areas. IoT will be a huge industry in the coming years. The true Internet 3.0 will be one of seamless data and value transfer. There will be a tremendous amount of devices connected to this network, from your light bulbs to your refrigerator to your car, all autonomously transacting together in an ever growing network in concert, creating an intelligent, seamless world of satisfying wants and needs.
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Let’s use the vastness of what the future state of this network is to be as our basis of what makes a good project.
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Scalability
In that future we will need very high scalability to accommodate the exponential growth in transaction volume that will occur. The network doesn’t need to have the ability to do high transactions per second in the beginning, just a robust plan to grow that ability as the network develops. We’ve seen this issue already with Bitcoin on an admittedly small market penetration. If scaling isn’t a one of the more prominent parts of your framework, that is a glaring hole.
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Applicability
Second to scalability is applicability. One size does not fit all in this space. Some uses will need real-time streaming of data where fast and cheap transactions are key and others will need heavier transactions full of data to be analyzed by the network for predictive uses. Some uses will need smart contracts so that devices can execute actions autonomously and others will need the ability to encrypt data and to transact anonymously to protect the privacy of the users in this future of hyper-connectivity. We cannot possibly predict the all of the future needs of this network so the ease of adaptability in a network of high applicability is a must.
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Interoperability
In order for this network to have the high level of applicability mentioned, it would need to have access to real world data outside of it’s network to work off of or even to transact with. This interoperability can come in several forms. I am not a maximalist, thinking that there will be one clear winner in any space. So it is easy, therefore, to imagine that we would want to be able to interact with some other networks for payment/settlement or data gathering. Maybe autonomously paying for bills with Bitcoin or Monero, maybe smart contracts that will need to be fed additional data from the Internet or maybe even sending an auto invite for a wine tasting for the wine shipment that’s been RFID’d and tracked through WTC. In either case, in order to afford the highest applicability, the network will need the ability to interact with outside networks.
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Consensus
How the network gains consensus is often something that is overlooked in the discussion of network suitability. If the network is to support a myriad of application and transaction types, the consensus mechanism must be able to handle it without choking the network or restricting transaction type. PoW can become a bottleneck as the competition for block reward requires an increase in difficulty for block generation, you therefore have to allow time for this computation in between blocks, often leading to less than optimal block times for fast transactions. This can create a transaction backlog as we have seen before. PoS can solve some of these issues but is not immune to this either. A novel approach to gaining consensus will have to be made if it is going to handle the variety and volume to be seen.
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Developability
All of this can be combined to create a network that is best equipped to take on the IoT ecosystem. But the penetration into the market will be solely held back by the difficulty in connecting and interacting with the network from the perspective of manufacturers and their devices. Having to learn a new code language in order to write a smart contract or create a node or if there are strict requirements on the hardware capability of the devices, these are all barriers that make it harder and more expensive for companies to work with the network. Ultimately, despite how perfect or feature packed your network is, a manufacturer will more likely develop devices for those that are easy to work with.
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In short, what the network needs to focus on is:
-Scalability – How does it globally scale?
-Applicability – Does it have data transfer ability, fast, cheap transactions, smart contracts, privacy?
-Interoperability – Can it communicate with the outside world, other blockchains?
-Consensus – Will it gain consensus in a way that supports scalability and applicability?
-Developability – Will it be easy for manufactures to develop devices and interact with the network?
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The idea of using blockchain technology to be the basis of the IoT ecosystem is not a new idea. There are several projects out there now that are aiming at tackling the problem. Below you will see a high level breakdown of those projects with some pros and cons from how I interpret the best solution to be. You will also see some supply chain projects listed below. Supply chain solutions are just small niches in the larger IoT ecosystem. Item birth record, manufacturing history, package tracking can all be “Things” which the Internet of Things track. In fact, INT already has leaked some information hinting that they are cooperating with pharmaceutical companies to track the manufacture and packaging of the drugs they produce. INT may someday include WTC or VEN as one of its subchains feeding in information into the ecosystem.
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IOTA
IOTA is a feeless and blockchain-less network called a directed acyclic graph. In my opinion, this creates more issues than it fixes.
The key to keeping IOTA feeless is that there are no miners to pay because the work associated with verifying a transaction is distributed to among all users, with each user verifying two separate transactions for their one. This creates some problems both in the enabling of smart contracts and the ability to create user privacy. Most privacy methods (zk-SNARKs in specific) require the one doing the verifying to use computationally intensive cryptography which are outside the capability of most devices on the IoT network (a weather sensor isn’t going to be able to build the ZK proof of a transaction every second or two). In a network where the device does the verifying of a transaction, cryptographic privacy becomes impractical. And even if there were a few systems capable of processing those transactions, there is no reward for doing the extra work. Fees keep the network safe by incentivizing honesty in the nodes, by paying those who have to work harder to verify a certain transaction, and by making it expensive to attack the network or disrupt privacy (Sybil Attacks).
IOTA also doesn’t have and may never have the ability to enable smart contracts. By the very nature of the Tangle (a chain of transactions with only partial structure unlike a linear and organized blockchain), establishing the correct time order of transactions is difficult, and in some situations, impossible. Even if the transactions have been time stamped, there is no way to verify them and are therefore open to spoofing. Knowing transaction order is absolutely vital to executing step based smart contracts.
There does exist a subset of smart contracts that do not require a strong time order of transactions in order to operate properly. But accepting this just limits the use cases of the network. In any case, smart contracts will not be able to operate directly on chain in IOTA. There will need to be a trusted off chain Oracle that watches transactions, establishes timelines, and runs the smart contract network
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-Scalability – High
-Applicability – Low, no smart contracts, no privacy, not able to run on lightweight devices
-Interoperability – Maybe, Oracle possibility
-Consensus – Low, DAG won’t support simple IoT devices and I don’t see all devices confirming other transactions as a reality
-Developability – To be seen, currently working with many manufacturers
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Ethereum
Ethereum is the granddaddy of smart contract blockchain. It is, arguably, in the best position to be the center point of the IoT ecosystem. Adoption is wide ranging, it is fast, cheap to transact with and well known; it is a Turing complete decentralized virtual computer that can do anything if you have enough gas and memory. But some of the things that make it the most advanced, will hold it back from being the best choice.
Turing completeness means that the programming language is complete (can describe any problem) and can solve any problem given that there is enough gas to pay for it and enough memory to run the code. You could therefore, create an infinite variety of different smart contracts. This infinite variability makes it impossible to create zk-SNARK verifiers efficiently enough to not cost more gas than is currently available in the block. Implementing zk-SNARKs in Ethereum would therefore require significant changes to the smart contract structure to only allow a small subset of contracts to permit zk-SNARK transactions. That would mean a wholesale change to the Ethereum Virtual Machine. Even in Zcash, where zk-SNARK is successfully implemented for a single, simple transaction type, they had to encode some of the network’s consensus rules into zk-SNARKs to limit the possible outcomes of the proof (Like changing the question of where are you in the US to where are you in the US along these given highways) to limit the computation time required to construct the proof.
Previously I wrote about how INT is using the Double Chain Consensus algorithm to allow easy scaling, segregation of network traffic and blockchain size by breaking the network down into separate cells, each with their own nodes and blockchains. This is building on lessons learned from single chain blockchains like Bitcoin. Ethereum, which is also a single chain blockchain, also suffers from these congestion issues as we have seen from the latest Cryptokitties craze. Although far less of an impact than that which has been seen with Bitcoin, transaction times grew as did the fees associated. Ethereum has proposed a new, second layer solution to solve the scaling issue: Sharding. Sharding draws from the traditional scaling technique called database sharding, which splits up pieces of a database and stores them on separate servers where each server points to the other. The goal of this is to have distinct nodes that store and verify a small set of transactions then tie them up to a larger chain, where all the other nodes communicate. If a node needs to know about a transaction on another chain, it finds another node with that information. What does this sound like? This is as close to an explanation of the Double Chain architecture as to what INT themselves provided in their whitepaper.
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-Scalability – Neutral, has current struggles but there are some proposals to fix this
-Applicability – Medium, has endless smart contract possibilities, no privacy currently with some proposals to fix this
-Interoperability – Maybe, Oracle possibility
-Consensus – Medium, PoW currently with proposals to change to better scaling and future proofing.
-Developability – To be seen
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IoTeX
A young project, made up of several accredited academics in cryptography, machine learning and data security. This is one of the most technically supported whitepapers I have read.They set out to solve scalability in the relay/subchain architecture proposed by Polkadot and used by INT. This architecture lends well to scaling and adaptability, as there is no end to the amount of subchains you can add to the network, given node and consensus bandwidth.
The way they look to address privacy is interesting. On the main parent (or relay) chain, they plan on implementing some of the technology from Monero, namely, ring signatures, bulletproofs and stealth addresses. While these are proven and respected technologies, this presents some worries as these techniques are known to not be lightweight and it takes away from the inherent generality of the core of the network. I believe the core should be as general and lightweight as possible to allow for scaling, ease of update, and adaptability. With adding this functionality, all data and transactions are made private and untraceable and therefore put through heavier computation. There are some applications where this is not optimal. A data stream may need to be read from many devices where encrypting it requires decryption for every use. A plain, public and traceable network would allow this simple use. This specificity should be made at the subchain level.
Subchains will have the ability to define their needs in terms of block times, smart contracting needs, etc. This lends to high applicability.
They address interoperability directly by laying out the framework for pegging (transaction on one chain causing a transaction on another), and cross-chain communication.
They do not address anywhere in the whitepaper the storage of data in the network. IoT devices will not be transaction only devices, they will need to maintain data, transmit data and query data. Without the ability to do so, the network will be crippled in its application.
IoTeX will use a variation of DPoS as the consensus mechanism. They are not specific on how this mechanism will work with no talk of data flow and node communication diagram. This will be their biggest hurdle and why I believe it was left out of the white paper. Cryptography and theory is easy to elaborate on within each specific subject but tying it all together, subchains with smart contracts, transacting with other side chains, with ring signatures, bulletproofs and stealth addresses on the main chain, will be a challenge that I am not sure can be done efficiently.
They may be well positioned to make this work but you are talking about having some of the core concepts of your network being based on problems that haven’t been solved and computationally heavy technologies, namely private transactions within smart contracts. So while all the theory and technical explanations make my pants tight, the realist in me will believe it when he sees it.
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-Scalability – Neutral to medium, has the framework to address it with some issues that will hold it back.
-Applicability – Medium, has smart contract possibilities, privacy baked into network, no data framework
-Interoperability – Medium, inherent in the network design
-Consensus – Low, inherent private transactions may choke network. Consensus mechanism not at all laid out.
-Developability – To be seen, not mentioned.
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CPChain
CPC puts a lot of their focus on data storage. They recognize that one of the core needs of an IoT network will be the ability to quickly store and reference large amounts of data and that this has to be separate from the transactional basis of the network as to not slow it down. They propose solving this using distributed hash tables (DHT) in the same fashion as INT, which stores data in a decentralized fashion so no one source owns the complete record. This system is much the same as the one used by BitTorrent, which allows data to be available regardless of which nodes will be online at a given time. The data privacy issue is solved by using client side encryption with one-to-many public key cryptography allowing many devices to decrypt a singly encrypted file while no two devices share the same key.
This data layer will be run on a separate, parallel chain as to not clog the network and to enable scalability. In spite of this, they don’t discuss how they will scale on the main chain. In order to partially solve this, it will use a two layer consensus structure centered on PoS to increase consensus efficiency. This two layer system will still require the main layer to do the entirety of the verification and block generation. This will be a scaling issue where the network will have no division of labor to segregate congestion to not affect the whole network.
They do recognize that the main chain would not be robust or reliable enough to handle high frequency or real-time devices and therefore propose side chains for those device types. Despite this, they are adding a significant amount of functionality (smart contracts, data interpretation) to the main chain instead of a more general and light weight main chain, which constrains the possible applications for the network and also makes it more difficult to upgrade the network.
So while this project, on the surface level (not very technical whitepaper), seems to be a robust and well thought out framework, it doesn’t lend itself to an all-encompassing IoT network but more for a narrower, data centric, IoT application.
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-Scalability – Neutral to medium, has the framework to address it somewhat, too much responsibility and functionality on the main chain may slow it down.
-Applicability – Medium, has smart contract possibilities, elaborate data storage solution with privacy in mind as well has high frequency applications thought out
-Interoperability – Low, not discussed
-Consensus – Low to medium, discussed solution has high reliance on single chain
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