Bitcoin Miner Software

Microcash - General Discussion

Microcash is a new form of cryptographic currency, currently under development. Bitcoin has been a genius proof-of-concept and proof-of-adoption digital commodity. The Microcash project hopes to vastly improve upon the distributed cryptographic currency idea with numerous innovations that current crypto-currencies cannot implement due to the nature of the bitcoin protocol.
[link]

PrivacyTools

You are being watched. Private and state-sponsored organizations are monitoring and recording your online activities. The PrivacyTools team is providing resources to protect your privacy against global, mass surveillance. Become a member of the PrivacyTools community to discuss online privacy and security, share information, and stay informed with the latest updates in the privacy world.
[link]

Decentralise the whole Internet

This subreddit is aimed at bringing together every project, idea and news related to decentralising the Internet. It is widely held that Privacy and Freedom are paramount nowadays. Many projects are already providing these services with many more in development. This subreddit should accelerate the thinking and bring together all the minds involved.
[link]

Bitcoin explained in plain English (so that you can explain this voodoo magic money to your mom)

Bitcoin explained in plain English
Like Paypal and Visa, Bitcoin is a system that can send money digitally. The innovation that sets Bitcoin apart is that it isn’t controlled or operated by a single company. Instead of having a company like Visa run the system, anybody can join the Bitcoin network and participate in the record keeping that keeps Bitcoin running. Nobody owns the Bitcoin software or the Bitcoin network. If an oppressive government wants to shut down Bitcoin, it can’t simply go after a single company. An oppressive government would (in theory) have to go after everybody running Bitcoin server software on their computer to shut it down.
In practice, the decentralization doesn’t actually work. Most people buy Bitcoins through exchanges run by private companies, which are subject to government-imposed laws and regulations. While Bitcoin’s innovation is interesting, it doesn’t actually do anything useful in the real world. However, very few people actually understand Bitcoin. So, journalists and cryptocurrency fanatics can make up fancy stories about how Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies will change the world.
What Bitcoin is
Bitcoin was originally designed to be a “Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System“. Think of other peer-to-peer systems like Napster or BitTorrent, except that users can exchange Bitcoins instead of files. Instead of having a single set of records controlled by one company, the set of records is copied to all the volunteer record keepers in the Bitcoin network. There can be hundreds or thousands of copies of the Bitcoin ledger distributed around the world. Changes to the ledger (from people sending Bitcoin to one another) are distributed throughout the network and each participant duplicates the record-keeping process on their copy of the ledger. This is the “distributed ledger” that everybody keeps talking about.
All of this means that the Bitcoin network can run by itself. Anybody can join the network and help keep it running.
Bitcoin in the real world
Unfortunately the key benefit to Bitcoin (the “decentralization” everybody keeps talking about) doesn’t actually pan out in the real world. Most people get Bitcoins by buying them via a centralized exchange, which are all private companies that can be shut down or bullied by the government. As all developed countries have laws against money laundering, banks will enforce these laws and will refuse to do business with exchanges that may be enabling questionable activities like online gambling with Bitcoins. Cryptocurrencies are effectively regulated by governments around the world. The only practical alternative to exchanges is to trade Bitcoins in person. However, this defeats the main benefit of digital money as face-to-face transactions are inconvenient. It’s unlikely that a system that involves trading paper money for Bitcoins will revolutionize the world.
Currently, the trend is that banks and credit card companies have been cutting off access to Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Banks have to comply with anti-money laundering regulations so that they don’t intentionally or unintentionally help criminals profit from illegal activities. A key part of fighting money laundering is knowing who your customers actually are. Criminals are less likely to use a bank as part of their illegal activities (e.g. to trade stolen Bitcoins for cash) if the bank knows their true identity. However, Bitcoin was designed to be anonymous as stated by its inventor’s white paper. (Bitcoin doesn’t fully succeed in allowing for anonymous payments. However, the anonymity that it does offer is enough to be problematic.) Bitcoin’s design makes it difficult for banks to obey the law if they are to allow access to Bitcoin exchanges. This is one of the many reasons why Bitcoin is unlikely to become a mainstream payment method for goods and services.
You can safely ignore the hype
If somebody tries to explain Bitcoin to you and you don’t understand it, the problem isn’t you. The person explaining Bitcoin likely has some misguided understanding of Bitcoin because there are certain things that they want to believe. Some people want to look smart by being early believers in new technology that they don’t understand. Some journalists want to write clickbait stories. Some people want to believe in get-rich-quick schemes. Some people are getting rich quick through cryptocurrency-related scams. Whatever the case is, I wouldn’t worry about it. You aren’t missing out on a revolutionary new technology. Bitcoin’s only innovation is interesting but useless in the real world.
Appendix A: What Bitcoin mining is (and why everybody is saying it’s bad for the environment)
The problem with a set of records delivered over the Internet is that you don’t know if some stranger on the Internet has nefariously tampered with the version that they sent you. It is possible for somebody to cheat the system by spending Bitcoins and then distributing a copy of the ledger that leaves out their spending, allowing them to spend their Bitcoins again. Other users somehow have to figure out which version of history is correct. To prevent shenanigans, each node on the Bitcoin network will determine trust based on “proof of work“. Trust will go to the side that has spent/wasted the most computing power to back up their version of events. The theory is that the honest users will always control more computing power than dishonest users.
To perform proof of work, Bitcoin “miners” do a set of very difficult mathematical calculations to try to find results with a certain number of zeroes in it. It’s basically computers competing over their ability to produce special numbers with a really long series of zeroes. Record keepers in the Bitcoin network (“nodes”) will trust the side that has wasted the most computing power. Because the math needed to find the special numbers is much harder than the math needed to verify the numbers (sort of like how Sudoku puzzles are harder to solve than to check), participants can easily verify which side wasted the most computing power. This is the key idea behind “blockchain“, the technology that tries to solve the problem of not being able to trust what strangers send you over the Internet. Honest record keepers will continue to add valid pages (blocks) to the Bitcoin journal. If the honest side controls more computing power, they will produce a longer chain of valid pages (blocks) than dishonest record keepers. Eventually, the honest record keepers’ version of events will be considered the authoritative one.
This system works as long as honest users throw more computing power at the problem than dishonest users. A dishonest user cannot pass off a bogus version of events (such as one that omits their spending) unless that user has more computing power than all of the honest users combined. To make attacks from dishonest users very difficult, the Bitcoin system provides incentives to its users to maintain a large standing army of computers that are ready to waste more computing power than people trying to cheat the system. Bitcoins are given out to users who devote computing power towards the Bitcoin cause. This is called Bitcoin “mining”, as the miners exert effort and are rewarded with digital “gold”. The creation of new Bitcoins is part of Bitcoin’s design.
If Bitcoin’s price averages $10,000, Bitcoin miners will receive $6.57 billion dollars worth of newly-printed Bitcoins in 2018 (1800 Bitcoins will be created every day in 2018). Bitcoin miners will also receive transaction fees from people who pay extra to have their transactions added to the ledger first (their transactions will be confirmed first). This might sound crazy but Bitcoin mining is on track to being a multi-billion dollar industry. Various companies will fight over their share of newly-printed Bitcoins. Competition will cause them to use a lot of electricity since electricity is the main ingredient needed to mine Bitcoins. Digiconomist has a webpage that estimates Bitcoin’s power consumption, which is currently about 1.3% of the United State’s energy consumption- that’s the same as millions of Americans. Bitcoin mining will consume as much energy as entire countries like Bangladesh.
While Bitcoin mining is one way to get Bitcoins, it is very expensive for most people compared to buying Bitcoins on an exchange. This is because Bitcoin mining benefits from scale. Big companies such as Bitmain will spend millions of dollars on designing computers that do one thing and one thing only: mine Bitcoins. Think of a calculator: it is a computer that does only one thing. Because it is designed for only one task, it does it very well. A calculator is incredibly energy efficient and cheap compared to your smartphone or laptop computer. Similarly, a computer that is designed specifically for mining Bitcoins does it more cost-effectively than everyday computers. Without millions of dollars spent designing special computers, access to very cheap electricity, and large data centers, normal citizens can’t compete against Bitcoin mining juggernauts. These companies drive up the cost of mining Bitcoins (Bitcoin is designed so that fewer Bitcoins are produced if more computing power is spent on mining), pushing out the small fish. You will likely lose money if you try to mine Bitcoin on your home computer.
Appendix B: Buzzwords and technobabble explained
ICO: Initial coin offering, or “it’s a con offering”. Generally speaking, these are investment scams where investors exchange real money for fake money (or a stake in a fake business or Ponzi scheme).
Immutable: can’t be changed. In theory, Bitcoin is designed so that the ledger can’t be changed. In the past, the ledger has been changed by the Bitcoin community banding together to fix bugs. One such bug allowed a hacker to give him or herself 184 billion Bitcoins.
Trustless: This refers to a trust problem that only decentralized systems have; centralized systems don’t have this problem. For Bitcoin specifically, the problem is this: some stranger on the Internet sent me a journal of all Bitcoin transactions and I don’t know if I should trust it. Bitcoin’s key innovative technology, the blockchain, attempts to solve that problem so that decentralization can work.
Blockchain: a journal of all (Bitcoin) transactions since the very beginning. Transactions are grouped together into chunks called blocks, which form the ‘pages’ of the journal. Miners solve difficult math puzzles so that they can attach special numbers to each block, proving that they spent a lot of computing power. A series (or chain) of blocks with the most computing power spent on ‘proving’ that chain will become the authoritative blockchain. This system works as long as the honest users waste more computer power and electricity than dishonest users.
Decentralization: a system that works without a trusted central authority.
Double spending: Cheating the system to spend the same Bitcoin two or more times, ultimately resulting in spending Bitcoins that you don’t have.
Secure: An adjective that describes systems other than Bitcoin. For starters, Bitcoin was hacked to create 184 billion Bitcoins. When the Mt. Gox exchange was hacked, at least 5% of all Bitcoins at the time (at least 650,000) were stolen. Many people also lose Bitcoins due to their computer being hacked, being tricked into giving away their passwords or identity, or from malicious browser add-ons. Bitcoin also has outstanding security issues that haven’t been fixed. If a single party controls 51% of the world’s Bitcoin mining power, that mining power can be used to disrupt the Bitcoin network. Currently, more than 51% of the world’s mining power is controlled by Chinese companies.
submitted by glennchan to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Not your keys, not your Bitcoin. Nor your social media. Nor your software distribution. Nor your internet. It's time to get back to the roots of our planet's nervous system: personal/public servers creating a network of diverse, free, open-source ideas.

Not your keys, not your Bitcoin.
This applies to nearly everything we use on the internet these days, not just Bitcoin wallets.
Reddit, Twitter, Facebook, Gmail, YouTube, Netflix, Amazon, have the keys.
Community "mods" and owners have the keys.
Internet service providers have the keys.
National, regional, and local governments have the keys.
Software and hardware companies have the keys.
In this case "the keys" refer to the authority to decide the who, what, where, when, how, and who uses them.
If we don't, individually, own, or have unconditional public access to, the communication tools we need to tell our stories, ask for important information, invent new tools, and just generally be the creative, curious, emotional and intelligent and philosophical animals that we were born to be, then our stories, questions, innovation, and connections are not ours.
A healthy biological organism is a loose network of individual nodes (unique, free-acting cells, for example), connected directly to one another, like the neurons in a brain. There is no hub. No central cell. No central rules for how each cell has to operate. No social norms. No authoritarian rule forcing cells to be something they are not. No predictability or artificial control. Just free flowing information from where it's collected and generated to whomever is connected.
For an internet to function like this, we need everyone to have their own personal websites/servers, ideally in a mesh network, or public/free internet providers, using rss-feed type subscription tools for discussing and sharing things as a group, and maybe bittorrent style up/downloading of software.
There is room for diversity, which means that centralized platforms and servers and such can still exist, but they can't be the only option. Ever again.
At least not if the goal is for the planet to mature into a whole, healthy, functioning organism, rather than this fetal mess of random stuff not yet capable of higher consciousness, or just breathing properly that we have now.
submitted by Turil to wholisticenchilada [link] [comments]

I have a few servers, the graphics card is very poor, there is no need to pay the electricity bill, is there any software that can evaluate which bitcoin is running higher on my server?

submitted by tomhasmail to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Former FED employee fined for installing Bitcoin mining software on FED server

Former FED employee fined for installing Bitcoin mining software on FED server submitted by mightymous95 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server submitted by BobAlison to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

South Korean Company Nayana to Pay $1 million in Bitcoin After Ransomware Attack (PSA: Servers with decade-old outdated software)

South Korean Company Nayana to Pay $1 million in Bitcoin After Ransomware Attack (PSA: Servers with decade-old outdated software) submitted by kaminishi to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server

submitted by 8YearOldiPod to business [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

www.Bitcoin-pool.de The BCO, Rupee and many other coins since 2 months we have rebuilt our pool. New stable server with the latest software so that almost all algos

www.Bitcoin-pool.de The BCO, Rupee and many other coins since 2 months we have rebuilt our pool. New stable server with the latest software so that almost all algos submitted by Bitcoin-pool-de to u/Bitcoin-pool-de [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Bitcoin mining software found on servers at UW System schools /r/wisconsin

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Bitcoin mining software found on servers at UW System schools /wisconsin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server submitted by RowdyReader to technology [link] [comments]

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: South Korean Company Nayana to Pay $1 million in Bitcoin After Ransomware Attack (PSA: Servers with decade-old outdated software) /r/pcmasterrace

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: South Korean Company Nayana to Pay $1 million in Bitcoin After Ransomware Attack (PSA: Servers with decade-old outdated software) /pcmasterrace submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

05-30 19:12 - 'NEWLY UPDATED. / Method on how to get Bitcoin. We are ready to share to the market our new Bitcoin software to Crack into any Bitcoin server and is easy to used.... / *** Anonymous (group) In Russia (CODE) We Work As Team...' by /u/flowbuzltd removed from /r/Bitcoin within 169-179min

'''
NEWLY UPDATED.
Method on how to get Bitcoin. We are ready to share to the market our new Bitcoin software to Crack into any Bitcoin server and is easy to used....
*** Anonymous (group) In Russia (CODE) We Work As Team & We Are One *** (DON'T GET RIPPED ANYMORE) ** I HACK INTO FACEBOOK ACCOUNT/USER ** I SALE HACKING SOFTWARE ** I HACK INTO ALL MOBILE PHONES/APPLE ** I HACK INTO ANY COMPANY BANK ACCOUNT ** I CAN BE HIRE FOR ANY HACKING JOB ** I SELL COMPANY LEADS/ WE HACK INTO COMPANY DATA BASE... ** I SELL GOOD SENDE SMTP MAILER WEBMAIL LOCAL HOST SENDER ** I SELL GOOD SCAM PAGE/GRABBER OF ALL EMAIL PAGE ** I HACK INTO ALL KIND OF EMAIL/ USING BOLT ZEUS OR RAT ** I HACK INTO GAMES/ I DO SHOPPING & SHOP ALL SORT OF GOODS. Those Are Just A Few Main Services, There Are Plenty More
IP Tracing IP Hacking ISP(internet service provider) Hacking Mobile Number tracing Theft Mobile recoveringIPhone Hacking /Post Software Hacking Recovering Stolen Data Hard disk Cloning Twitter Hacking Hotmail Hacking Rediff mail Hacking Yandex mail Hacking Instagram HackingPinterest Hacking Dribble Hacking YouTube channel Hacking Blogger Hacking WordPress Hacking WordPress Cloning Cpanel Hacking Database dumping Database editing Database securing Credit Fraud Recovering Windows Hacking WIFI Password Cracking Hacker For Hire Contact: only email: [email protected] [email protected]
'''
Context Link
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: flowbuzltd
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Former FED employee fined for installing Bitcoin mining software on FED server

Former FED employee fined for installing Bitcoin mining software on FED server submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[complete newbie] How might I find out if bitcoin mining software is installed on a linux server?

Disclaimer: I've never done anything whatsoever with bitcoin
TLDR: See bold text below
I work for a small branch (6 programmers) of a larger (50 programmers) software company. I'm the only remote employee, and therefore I'm often out of the loop on stuff that happens in the office, such as job interviews for other programmers. When they interview 10 people a week, I can't afford to dial in for each one.
We have about 2 dozen linux servers, some very powerful machines, and our business is growing exponentially for our 7th straight year. As such, hardware resources are stretched to capacity.
I didn't get a chance to interview our latest hire, but from what I understand, he does a lot of stuff with bitcoin.
I'm a little bit afraid that he might use our servers for bitcoin mining... Part of his duties include sysadmin stuff.
Assuming he doesn't take any steps to hide what he's doing, what can I look for on a linux server to see if someone is bitcoin mining?
Thanks in advance
submitted by trevdak2 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

small passive income while browsing the web

Introduction
If you were on the internet in the late 1990s, you might remember companies like "AllAdvantage" that promised to pay you to browse the web. You could install a program that tracked your browsing and showed you targeted ads at the top of the screen, then "AllAdvantage" would give you a cut of the ad revenue you generated.
These schemes largely disappeared after the dot-com crash. But Brendan Eich, the creator of the JavaScript programming language and cofounder and former CTO of Mozilla, thinks his company Brave Software has found a way to revive that old idea.
What is it?
Brave makes a browser based on Google Chrome that blocks tracking scripts and other technologies that spy on your online activity. As a result, it also blocks many web ads; if you visit any website using the Brave browser, you won’t see any ads. But Brave will give users the option to see ads that Eich says will respect your privacy. The ads will appear as desktop notifications, he says, not as replacements for the ads the Brave browser blocks. So you still won’t see ads on any website, but you might see them on the right lower corner of your screen. If you choose to see these ads, you’ll get 70 percent of the revenue they generate.
Eich hopes Brave can solve two of the web's most vexing problems the privacy and revenue problem by turning the traditional digital advertising model on its head. Today, ad networks pay sites for ad space and web browsers like Brave and Chrome deliver content from those publishers to users. Brave is trying to put the browser in the center of the advertising experience. Instead of paying publishers directly, ad networks would pay Brave, which will pass part of the money to users and keep a cut for itself.
By handling advertising in the browser on your device, Brave says it will be able to target ads without sending your data to the cloud, and protect your privacy. When you interact with an ad on Brave, the browser sends notice to the company's servers, but doesn't include any identifying information. Eich sees four sets of winners: browser makers get paid; users get paid, and get more privacy; advertisers can target pitches without running afoul of European privacy regulations; and publishers can survive in a world where many users are installing ad blockers.
Publishers and ad networks might bristle at the idea of putting browser makers in the middle of their business. But in recent years browsers have taken a more active role in shaping the web, instead of merely displaying a website’s content. Chrome now blocks ads on a small number of sites with particularly egregious advertising practices, while browsers like Firefox and Safari have added privacy protections. Meanwhile, browser plugins are giving users more control over their experience. There are Chrome extensions, for example, that let you change Facebook's color scheme, or change the way images are displayed on Pinterest. And of course there are extensions that block all ads.
Trying to win advertisers and publishers to a new model isn't Brave's only challenge. It also needs users. Eich says Brave has 15 million users and is growing.
Brave will give users a 70 percent cut of its advertising revenue, which Eich estimates could work out to about $10 a month. Brave will pay users with its own bitcoin-style "cryptocurrency” called Basic Attention Tokens or BAT, which has traded for as little as 24 cents over the past 12 months, according to CoinMarketCap. You can exchange the BAT you have received for viewing ads into USD, EUR, GBP, CHF and many more currencies.
The company offers a service through the cryptocurrency exchange Uphold to allow users to change, sell and buy BAT or donate it to publishers, and for publishers to exchange the BAT they receive for dollars. Advertisers like HomeDepot or recent campaigns included brands such as Verizon, Newegg, Chipotle, and PayPal/Honey, in addition to earlier campaigns by Amazon, Harry’s Razors, Intel, CBS, KIND snacks, Logitech, Lenovo, Grubhub, Belkin, Quickbooks, Evernote and some of cryptocurrency related companies, will be able to buy ads either with BAT or with traditional currencies.
Eich says Brave opted to create its own tokens using the Ethereum cryptocurrency platform in part to avoid regulatory requirements, such as verifying users' identifies, that partners like Uphold are better equipped to handle.
Estimated revenue? (depending on the country you live in the revenue can be higher or lower)
I made around 3oo$ so far this year using 3 devices, just for viewing some ads.
5 months so far july is not included if you calculate it down for 1 device, 100$/5months = 20$ a month just for viewing ads, you would need to buy risky stocks worth of 2000$ to get the same amount per month.
can only recommend everyone to try it, not every country has the same number of advertisers so you probably get the most out of it when you live in the USA.
If you are interested here is a quick guide how to set it up to get the max amount out of Brave:
Quickstartguide:
1 Download brave here
2 Activate the reward system (gif link below)Gif link
3 go into the settings an deactivate auto contribution and activate 5 ads per hour (image link below)image link
4 Create an Account on Uphold and connect it with your BraveBrowser.
Now you are good to go and can make some money on something you do anyway.
I hope this helps some folks in the community to make some extra bucks.
edit1:you can find more infos and support here:brave_browser & BATProject or www.brave.com
edit2:the earnings are depenging on the number of devices you are using and were you are living. Best paying countries: United States (69) United Kingdom (39) Canada (36) Australia (35) New Zealand (26) Germany (21) Ireland (21) France (18)( the number next to the country are the companies that are running ads on brave for this particular country, the more companies the more revenue )
you can find a full list with all countries and campaigns here: https://brave.com/transparency/
edit3:You don't need to browse to a certain website to receive ads, just browse as you are used to, play browser games, watch videos on youtube or do whatever you want.Sometimes Ads appear on the startpage looks like that https://i.imgur.com/5tohhRc.jpg and after some time on the right lower corner a clickable pop-up appears looks like that->https://i.imgur.com/CTGdVsu.png
edit4:If you want to import your bookmarks and settings from your old browser:on the right top corner of the browser is a button ->https://i.imgur.com/oi8EAri.jpg click it > than on settings > and than you got the option to import bookmarks and settings from your old browser.
If you want to sync brave between devices and for backups:type brave://flags/ into the adressbar and than brave sync into the search bar and acticate itif its enabled it should look like this https://imgur.com/a/tCMDgDjthan just click on sync ->https://i.imgur.com/oi8EAri.jpg
here is a guide ->https://support.brave.com/hc/en-us/articles/360021218111-How-do-I-set-up-Sync
edit5: Don't keep your BAT from free token grants to long in your browser, always send your bat to an external wallet or exchange like uphold, only tokens from free token grants have an expire date if they dont get used they go back to the bat pool. you can find more infos about this here -> https://support.brave.com/hc/en-us/articles/360018305731-Why-does-my-BAT-have-an-expiration-date-
submitted by OnlyReveal6 to beermoneyglobal [link] [comments]

Who are the humans controlling bitcoin server side software and how do they do it?

In the process of "selling" the idea of taking bitcoin at my friends business I was confronted with a question that I'm still unsure about. Remember when the software was recently updated to allow larger block sizes or whatever it was? I'm just wondering who makes those decisions and what stops them for making a bad decision. I don't really understand the concept of open source software in general so maybe that's part of the issue. Explain away! Thanks!
submitted by anaglyphic to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

(/.) Former Fed Employee Fined $5,000 For Installing Bitcoin Software On Server

submitted by Mukhasim to UMukhasimAutoNews [link] [comments]

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server submitted by davispolkreg to BeyondSandbox [link] [comments]

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server

This is an automatic summary, original reduced by 43%.
A former Federal Reserve employee was sentenced to 12 months' probation and issued a $5,000 fine for installing unauthorized bitcoin software on a Fed server, a government watchdog said Monday.
Nicholas Berthaume, who worked as a network systems communications analyst at the Fed board in Washington, installed the software so he could connect to an online bitcoin network to earn bitcoins, the Fed's inspector general said.
Users earn bitcoins by allowing their systems' computing power to be part of the network that processes and verifies bitcoin transactions, the IG said.
It wasn't clear how many bitcoins Mr. Berthaume was able to earn by connecting the Fed's servers to the network.
The IG said the incident didn't result in a loss of Fed information, but the central bank has implemented "Security enhancements" as a result of the case.
"This case demonstrates how my office will vigorously pursue Board employees who unlawfully abuse their positions and use government property for personal gain," Fed IG Mark Bialek said.
Summary Source | FAQ | Theory | Feedback | Top five keywords: bitcoin#1 Fed#2 software#3 network#4 earn#5
Post found in /Bitcoin, /business, /technology and /BitcoinAll.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
submitted by autotldr to autotldr [link] [comments]

👍🏼✔️️[H] Windows🔑 | Server🚀 | Office💻 🔥| Visio | Project🔑 | Visual Studio | Adobe CC 🔑 [W]Zelle, Venmo, Amazon Gift, Bitcoin,🚀 Ethereum, 💻 Credit Cards💳, PayPal

ALL PRICES ARE IN USD

PAYMENT METHODS

Please make sure you look at my most recent thread for updated prices and products

Currently giving 10% off when Bitcoin and Ehtereum is used!!

Need Win 10 for 100+ Machines? Ask me for details

Adobe Creative Cloud 1 Year Keys in stock!

HOW TO BUY

DO NOT contact me via chat only via PM

Windows10

Price Download Paying with Credit Card Paying with Zelle Paying with Bitcoin Paying with PayPal Paying with Amazon Gift Card Paying with Venmo
Windows 10 Home $40 32/64Bit Downloa Pay Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Windows 10 Education $30 32/64Bit Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Windows 10 Pro N $35 32/64Bit Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Windows 10 Pro $45 32/64Bit Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Windows 10 Enterprise $50 32/64Bit Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo

Office

Price Download Paying with Credit Card Paying with Zelle Paying with Bitcoin Paying with PayPal Paying with Amazon Gift Card Paying with Venmo
Office 2019 Pro Plus $60 Request Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Office 2013 Pro Plus $30 Request Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Office 2016 Pro Plus $50 Request Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Office 2016 For Mac Home And Business $50 Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Office 2019 For Mac Home And Business $80 Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo

Adobe Creative Cloud 1 Year Key What's Included?

Price Download Paying with Credit Card Paying with Zelle Paying with Bitcoin Paying with PayPal Paying with Amazon Gift Card Paying with Venmo
Adobe CC 1 Year Key $175 Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo

WINDOWS SERVER

Price Download Paying with Credit Card Paying with Zelle Paying with Bitcoin Paying with PayPal Paying with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Windows Server 2016 $35 Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Windows Server 2016 Datacenter $40 Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Windows Server 2019 $50 Request Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Windows Server 2019 Datacenter $60 Request Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo

VISUAL STUDIO

Price Download Paying with Credit Card Paying with Cash App Paying with Bitcoin Paying with PayPal Paying with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Visual Studio Enterprise 2017 $40 Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo
Visual Studio Enterprise 2019 $60 Download Pay with Credit Card Pay with Zelle Pay with Bitcoin Pay with PayPal Pay with Amazon Gift Card Pay with Venmo

PROJECT

Price Message
Project 2019 Pro $40 Message
Project 2016 Pro $30 Message

VISIO

Price Message
Visio 2019 Pro $40 Message
Visio 2016 Pro $30 Message

DISLCLAIMER

submitted by s5ean to microsoftsoftwareswap [link] [comments]

Best Bitcoin Miner software 2020 - Earn 0.5 Btc Best Bitcoin Mining Script 2020 Easy To Download New Bitcoin Mining Software Earn 0 5 Btc FULL VERSION By Far The BEST Bitcoin Mining Software In 2020 Profitable Hack non spendable Bitcoin software

If you aren’t already logged into the computer you want to install Bitcoin on, login now. Make sure you use an account that can use su or sudo to install software into directories owned by the root user. If you logged in graphically, start a terminal. If you logged in another way, we will assume you’re already in a shell. The main job of the software is to deliver the mining hardware’s work to the rest of the Bitcoin network and to receive the completed work from other miners on the network. Bitcoin mining software monitors this input and output of your miner while also displaying statistics such as the speed of your miner, hashrate, fan speed and the temperature. 3. Best Bitcoin mining software CGminer. Pros: Supports GPU/FPGA/ASIC mining, Popular (frequently updated). Cons: Textual interface. Platforms: Windows, Mac, Linux Going strong for many years, CGminer is still one of the most popular GPU/FPGA/ASIC mining software available. CGminer is a command line application written in C. It’s also cross platform, meaning you can use it with Windows User testimonials reveal that users claim to make an average profit of $2000 per day with Bitcoin Miner. This software applies top-level crypto mining technology to get the most out of users The Best Bitcoin mining Software, try it Now! Depending on the difficulty of mining the block and the value to be deciphered, your profit may change, however, on average our users with the key of the Silver plan, with 3 uses in a day, have been able to generate between 0.15 BTC and 0.32 BTC, which is profitable if you compare it with the investment of the Mining key.

[index] [14506] [17496] [25829] [12667] [8985] [14982] [8334] [15509] [11031] [17865]

Best Bitcoin Miner software 2020 - Earn 0.5 Btc

🍓 Best Bitcoin Mining Software That Work in 2020 🍓 - Duration: 5:34. Bitcoin Community Recommended for you. 5:34. Windows Server Administration for Beginners - Duration: 1:15:28. Telegram:@Cyberlord6 _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ bitcoin mining software, bitcoin mining software 2019, bitcoin mining software for pc, bitcoin, bitcoin mining, bitcoin miner, free bitcoin ... bitcoin mining software, bitcoin mining software 2019, ... best bitcoin miner app, bitcoin server mining app review, bitcoin miner scam or legit? results of the $250 test 2020 mining free, ... 🍓 Best Bitcoin Mining Software That Work in 2020 🍓 - Duration: 5:34. Bitcoin Community 174,508 views. ... Server Bitcoin Miner Totally Fake App - Duration: 1:23. Onhax Pk 14,111 views. Download: https://bit.ly/3hj0AFh Key:123 bitcoin mining software, bitcoin mining software 2019, bitcoin mining software for pc, bitcoin, bitcoin mining, bitc...

Flag Counter